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Title:  WWC Review of the Report "The Role of Application Assistance and Information in College Decisions: Results from the H&R Block FAFSA Experiment"
Description: The 2012 study, The Role of Application Assistance and Information in College Decisions: Results from the H&R Block FAFSA Experiment, examined the impact of two interventions related to the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) on postsecondary outcomes of low- to moderate-income individuals. The two interventions included (1) providing an estimate of need-based aid compared against tuition costs for nearby colleges and assistance in completing the FAFSA, and (2) only providing an estimate of need-based aid. Outcomes included the likelihood of filing the FAFSA, college enrollment, receipt of a Pell Grant, and retention in college after 2 years. Researchers presented results for three distinct subgroups: (a) 17-year-old high school seniors and recent graduates who were dependent on their parents; (b) independent adults aged 24 to 30 years with no college experience; and (c) independent adults aged 24 to 30 years with some college, but no degree. The research described in this report meets WWC evidence standards with reservations. This study is a well-executed randomized controlled trial; however, impacts were presented for three distinct subgroups, and attrition for each of the subgroups cannot be calculated due to unknown subgroup information at baseline.
Online Availability:
Cover Date: November 2013
Web Release: November 19, 2013
Publication #: WWC SSR10030
Center/Program: WWC
Authors: WWC
Type of Product: Single Study Review
Keywords:
Questions: For questions about the content of this Single Study Review, please contact:
Diana McCallum.
 
 
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National Center for Education Statistics - http://nces.ed.gov
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