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Fifty-Six Percent of Public Schools are Offering After-School Programs to Students Who Need Academic Assistance for 2022-23 School Year

November 3, 2022

NCES data show 49 percent of public schools offering this type of after-school programming incorporate high-dosage tutoring

In July 2023, NCES revised estimates from the January 2022 through December 2022 collections of the School Pulse Panel (SPP), based on a reweighting of the data. Revised estimates appear on the SPP dashboard (https://ies.ed.gov/schoolsurvey/spp/). For a description of the reweighting of the data and its effect on the estimates, please visit https://ies.ed.gov/schoolsurvey/spp/ReweightingMemo.pdf. If you have further questions about these revised estimates, email schoolpulsepanel@ed.gov.

WASHINGTON (November 3, 2022)—Fifty-six percent of public schools are offering after-school programs for students who need academic assistance during the 2022-23 school year, according to data released today by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), the statistical center within the U.S. Department of Education's Institute of Education Sciences (IES). Nearly half of public schools that offer this type of programming do so for 1-2 hours per day (46 percent) for 4 or 5 days per week (46 percent).

“These data shed new light on some of the academic assistance strategies public schools are employing during this school year,” said NCES Commissioner Peggy G. Carr. “Schools are providing after-school programs to support their students, including programs for those who need extra support and those who are looking for additional learning opportunities. Nearly half of schools that are offering after-school programing for students who need academic assistance are incorporating high-dosage tutoring and 40 percent are incorporating other types of tutoring.”

Forty-three percent of public schools are offering after-school programs for students who are seeking academic enrichment during the 2022-23 school year. Of the schools offering this programming, 30 percent are offering high-dosage tutoring, which incorporates 3 or more tailored instructional sessions in small groups or one-on-one sessions per week.

As of September, 86 percent of public schools had no COVID-19 vaccination requirements for staff to be in the school building for the 2022-23 school year. In addition, 99 percent of public schools had no COVID-19 vaccination requirements for students to be in the school building. To help improve air quality in schools and prevent spread of the virus, 33 percent of public schools had installed or used high-efficiency particular (HEPA) air filtration systems in classrooms for the 2022-23 school year.

The findings released today are from the School Pulse Panel. The School Pulse Panel is part of NCES’s innovative approach to delivering timely information regarding the pandemic’s impact on public K12 schools in the U.S. on topics such as after-school programs, mitigation strategies, learning mode offerings, and quarantine prevalence, as reported by school staff in U.S. public schools.

The findings released today are part of the ninth monthly experimental data product from the School Pulse Panel. The September data were collected from 1,010 participating schools between September 13 and September 27, 2022.

Experimental data products are innovative statistical products created using new data sources or methodologies. Experimental data may not meet all NCES quality standards but are of sufficient benefit to data users in the absence of other relevant products to justify release. NCES clearly identifies experimental data products upon their release.

The data released today can be found on the School Pulse Panel dashboard at https://ies.ed.gov/schoolsurvey/.

Key Findings 

After-School Programs for 2022-23

  • Fifty-six percent of public schools are offering after-school programs for students who need academic assistance during the 2022-23 school year. Nearly half of public schools that offer this type of programming do so for 1-2 hours per day (46 percent),for 4 or 5 days per week (46 percent).
    • Forty-nine percent of public schools offering this type of programming incorporate high-dosage tutoring into the programming, while 40 percent incorporate some other type of tutoring.
  • Forty-three percent of public schools are offering after-school programs for students who are seeking academic enrichment during the 2022-23 school year. Nearly half of public schools that offer this type of programming do so for 1-2 hours per day (45 percent), for 4 or 5 days per week (47 percent).
    • Thirty percent of public schools offering this type of programming incorporate high-dosage tutoring into the programming, while 37 percent incorporate some other type of tutoring.

COVID-19 Mitigation

  • As of September 2022, 86 percent of public schools had no COVID-19 vaccination requirements for staff to be in the school building for the 2022-23 school year. Ninety-nine percent of public schools had no COVID-19 vaccination requirements for students to be in the school building for the 2022-23 school year.
  • The percentage of public schools requiring students and staff to wear masks in the school building in September 2022 was not measurably different than the percentage that required masks at the end of the 2021-22 school year. Thirteen percent of public schools required that students wear masks inside the school building in September 2022, compared to 14 percent at the end of the 2021-22 school year. Fourteen percent of public schools required that staff wear masks inside the school building in September, compared to 14 percent at the end of 21-22 school year.
  • The percentages of public schools requiring daily COVID-19 symptom screening for students and staff had decreased in September compared to the rates at the end of the 2021-22 school year. In September 2022, 4 and 5 percent of public schools required daily symptom screening for students and staff, respectively. These rates were 15 and 19 percent, respectively, at the end of the 2021-22 school year.
  • Similarly, the percentage of public schools providing COVID-19 testing to students and staff even if they had no symptoms or possible exposure had decreased in September compared to the end of the 2021-22 school year. In September 2022, 21 and 27 percent of public schools provided on-site COVID-19 testing to students and staff, respectively. These rates were 30 and 39 percent, respectively, at the end of 2021-22 school year.
  • For the 2022-23 school year, 80 percent of public schools require staff and students who test positive for COVID-19 to stay home and not be in the school building. About one-third of public schools require those who display COVID-19-like symptoms or who have potentially been exposed to COVID-19 to stay home and not be in the school building.
    • Twelve percent of all public schools have no requirements for circumstances under which individuals have to stay home and not be in the school building for COVID-19-related reasons.
  • For the 2022-23 school year, 33 percent of schools installed or used high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtration systems in classrooms and 29 percent replaced or upgraded their HVAC systems.

Learning Modes and Quarantine Prevalence

  • Comparing learning mode offerings during September 2022 and the end of the 2021-22 school year (June 2022):
    • The percentage of schools offering in-person learning are comparable (99 percent versus 98 percent)
    • The percentage of schools offering remote learning has decreased (18 percent versus 33 percent)
    • The percentage of schools offering hybrid learning have decreased (6 percent versus 10 percent)
  • The percentage of public schools that reported having to quarantine students in September was 47 percent, an increase from the 33 percent that required students to quarantine at the end of the 2021-22 school year. Twenty-seven percent of public schools reported having to quarantine staff members in September, a similar rate that required staff to quarantine at the end of the 2021-22 school year (25 percent).

Summer 2022 Programming

  • Seventy percent of public schools offered summer school (required for certain students) during summer 2022. On average, these programs lasted 5 weeks and operated 5 hours per day, with 90 percent of public schools offering summer school providing it 4 or 5 days per week.
    • Of these public schools that offered summer school (required for certain students) during summer 2022, 34 percent incorporated high-dosage tutoring as part of summer school programming.
  • Seventy percent of public schools operated learning and enrichment programs that were hosted by their school or district during summer 2022. On average, these programs lasted 5 weeks and operated 5 hours per day, with 85 percent of public schools that offered these learning and enrichment programs providing it for 4 or 5 days per week.
    • Of these public schools that offered summer learning and enrichment programs that were hosted by their school or district during summer 2022, 23 percent incorporated high-dosage tutoring as part of summer school programming.

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The National Center for Education Statistics, a principal agency of the U.S. Federal Statistical System, is the statistical center of the U.S. Department of Education and the primary federal entity for collecting and analyzing data related to education in the U.S. and other nations. NCES fulfills a congressional mandate to collect, collate, analyze, and report complete statistics on the condition of American education; conduct and publish reports; and review and report on education activities internationally. Follow NCES on TwitterFacebookLinkedIn, and YouTube and subscribe to the NCES News Flash to receive email notifications when new data is released.

The Institute of Education Sciences (IES) is the independent and nonpartisan statistics, research, and evaluation arm of the U.S. Department of Education. Its mission is to provide scientific evidence on which to ground education practice and policy and to share this information in formats that are useful and accessible to educators, parents, policymakers, researchers, and the public.

CONTACT:
Josh Delarosa, National Center for Education Statistics, Aris.nces@ed.gov
James Elias, Hager Sharp, jelias@hagersharp.com