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 Pub Number  Title  Date
WWC SSR062816 WWC Review of the Report "Music Training Alters the Course of Adolescent Auditory Development"
The study authors examined whether high school students who chose to enroll and remain in a music training program improved their auditory and literacy skills more than students who did not choose to enroll in a music training program. The music program included instruction on playing instruments in groups using written music.
6/28/2016
WWC SSRM12 Academic Music: Music Instruction to Engage Third-Grade Students in Learning Basic Fraction Concepts
The study reviewed by the WWC, Academic Music: Music Instruction to Engage Third-Grade Students in Learning Basic Fraction Concepts, examined the effectiveness of using music instruction to teach basic fraction concepts to third-grade students. Sixty-seven students in four classrooms from one northern California elementary school were nonrandomly selected to either receive music instruction or regular math instruction for learning fraction concepts. Researchers then analyzed student performance on a music notation test, a fraction concepts test, and a fraction computation worksheet. The research described in this report does not meet WWC evidence standards because the intervention was implemented by a single team consisting of a music teacher and a university researcher. Their teaching abilities may have affected student achievement even in the absence of the intervention, and it is not possible to separate the effect of the intervention from the effect of their teaching abilities.
7/31/2012
NCES 2012017 Public-Use Data Files and Documentation (FRSS 102): Arts Education Surveys of Elementary School Teachers
This file contains data from three fast-response surveys, titled “Survey of Elementary School Music Specialists,” “Survey of Elementary School Visual Arts Specialists,” and “Arts Survey of Elementary School Classroom Teachers.” These surveys provide national estimates on arts education and arts instructors in public elementary schools during the 2009–10 school year. These three surveys are part of a set of seven surveys that collected data on arts education during the 2009–10 school year. In addition to these elementary teacher surveys, the set includes a survey of elementary school principals, a survey of secondary school principals, and two secondary teacher-level surveys. NCES released the results of this set of surveys in the First Look report “A Snapshot of Arts Education in Public Elementary and Secondary Schools: 2009–10 (NCES 2011-078). A second report, released in April 2012, presents findings on a broader set of indicators.

Questionnaires and cover letters for the surveys were mailed to sampled elementary school teachers in batches from January through April 2010. The letter introduced the study and requested that the questionnaire be completed by the sampled teacher. Respondents were offered the option of responding to the survey via the web or by mail. Telephone follow-up for survey nonresponse and data clarification was conducted from February through August 2010. The weighted response rates were 86.5 percent for the music specialist survey, 87.6 percent for the visual arts specialist survey, and 81.5 percent for the classroom teacher survey.

Previous studies of arts education were conducted during the 1994–95 and the 1999–2000 school years, with surveys of elementary school teachers first included in the 1999–2000 study. In addition to including many of the research questions from the previous study, the current study addresses emerging issues, such as the availability of curriculum-based arts education activities outside of regular school hours. The elementary teacher surveys collected data on the teaching load of music and visual arts specialists in elementary schools; teacher participation in various professional development activities; the ways in which self-contained classroom teachers teach arts education as part of their instructional program; and teachers’ use of formal methods of assessment of students’ achievement in the arts.
4/24/2012
NCES 2012014REV Arts Education in Public Elementary and Secondary Schools: 1999-2000 and 2009-10
This report presents selected findings from a congressionally mandated study on arts education in public K–12 schools. The data were collected through seven Fast Response Survey System (FRSS) surveys during the 2009-10 school year. This report provides national data about arts education for public elementary and secondary schools, elementary classroom teachers, and elementary and secondary music and visual arts specialists. Comparisons with data from the 1999–2000 FRSS arts education study are included where applicable.
4/2/2012
NCES 2012019 Public-Use Data Files and Documentation (FRSS 103): Arts Education Surveys of Secondary School Teachers
This file contains data from two fast-response surveys, titled “Survey of Secondary School Music Specialists,” and “Survey of Secondary School Visual Arts Specialists.” These surveys provide national estimates on arts education and arts instructors in public secondary schools during the 2009–10 school year. These two surveys are part of a set of seven surveys that collected data on arts education during the 2009–10 school year. In addition to these secondary teacher surveys, the set includes a survey of elementary school principals, a survey of secondary school principals, and three elementary teacher-level surveys. NCES released the results of this set of surveys in the First Look report “A Snapshot of Arts Education in Public Elementary and Secondary Schools: 2009–10 (NCES 2011-078). A second report, released in April 2012, presents findings on a broader set of indicators.

Questionnaires and cover letters for the surveys were mailed to each sampled secondary school teacher in batches from January through April 2010. The letter introduced the study and requested that the questionnaire be completed by the sampled teacher. Respondents were offered the option of responding to the survey via the web or by mail. Telephone follow-up for survey nonresponse and data clarification was conducted from February through July 2010. The weighted response rates were 81.8 percent for the music specialist survey and 85.3 percent for the visual arts specialist survey.

This study of arts education in public schools is the third of its kind conducted by NCES. Previous studies were conducted during the 1994–95 and the 1999–2000 school years. This is the first time that surveys of secondary school teachers have been included in the study. In addition to including many of the research questions from the previous study, the current study addresses emerging issues, such as the availability of curriculum-based arts education activities outside of regular school hours. The secondary teacher surveys collected data on the teaching load of music and visual arts specialists in secondary schools; teacher participation in various professional development activities and the perceived impact of such participation on teaching; and teachers’ use of formal methods of assessment of students’ progress and achievement in the arts.
4/2/2012
NCES 2012015 Public-Use Data Files and Documentation (FRSS 100): Elementary School Arts Education Survey: Fall 2009
This file contains data from a fast-response survey titled “Elementary School Arts Education Survey: Fall 2009.” This survey provides national estimates on student access to arts education and resources available for such instruction in public elementary schools during fall 2009. This is one of a set of seven surveys that collected data on arts education during the 2009–10 school year. In addition to this survey, the set includes a survey of secondary school principals, three elementary teacher-level surveys, and two secondary teacher-level surveys. NCES released the results of this set of surveys in the First Look report “A Snapshot of Arts Education in Public Elementary and Secondary Schools: 2009–10 (NCES 2011-078). A second report, released in April 2012, presents findings on a broader set of indicators. NCES is releasing separate data files for each of the seven surveys.

Questionnaires and cover letters for the study were mailed to the principal of each sampled elementary school in September 2009. The letter introduced the study and requested that the questionnaire be completed by the school principal. Respondents were offered the option of responding to the survey via the web or by mail. Telephone follow-up for survey nonresponse and data clarification was conducted from October 2009 through June 2010. The weighted response rate was 85 percent.

This study of arts education in public schools is the third of its kind to be conducted by NCES. Previous studies were conducted during the 1994–95 and the 1999–2000 school years. In addition to including many of the research questions from the previous study, the current study addresses emerging issues, such as the availability of curriculum-based arts education activities outside of regular school hours. The elementary school survey collected data on the availability and characteristics of music, visual arts, dance, and drama/theatre instruction; the type of space used for arts instruction; the availability of curriculum guides for arts teachers to follow; and whether those teaching the subject are arts specialists. Principals also reported on school or district provision of teacher professional development in the arts; arts education programs, activities, and events; and school-community partnerships.
4/2/2012
NCES 2012020 Restricted-Use Data Files and Documentation (FRSS 103): Arts Education Surveys of Secondary School Teachers
This file contains data from two fast-response surveys, titled “Survey of Secondary School Music Specialists,” and “Survey of Secondary School Visual Arts Specialists.” These surveys provide national estimates on arts education and arts instructors in public secondary schools during the 2009–10 school year. These two surveys are part of a set of seven surveys that collected data on arts education during the 2009–10 school year. In addition to these secondary teacher surveys, the set includes a survey of elementary school principals, a survey of secondary school principals, and three elementary teacher-level surveys. NCES released the results of this set of surveys in the First Look report “A Snapshot of Arts Education in Public Elementary and Secondary Schools: 2009–10 (NCES 2011-078). A second report, released in April 2012, presents findings on a broader set of indicators.

Questionnaires and cover letters for the surveys were mailed to each sampled secondary school teacher in batches from January through April 2010. The letter introduced the study and requested that the questionnaire be completed by the sampled teacher. Respondents were offered the option of responding to the survey via the web or by mail. Telephone follow-up for survey nonresponse and data clarification was conducted from February through July 2010. The weighted response rates were 81.8 percent for the music specialist survey and 85.3 percent for the visual arts specialist survey.

This study of arts education in public schools is the third of its kind conducted by NCES. Previous studies were conducted during the 1994–95 and the 1999–2000 school years. This is the first time that surveys of secondary school teachers have been included in the study. In addition to including many of the research questions from the previous study, the current study addresses emerging issues, such as the availability of curriculum-based arts education activities outside of regular school hours. The secondary teacher surveys collected data on the teaching load of music and visual arts specialists in secondary schools; teacher participation in various professional development activities and the perceived impact of such participation on teaching; and teachers’ use of formal methods of assessment of students’ progress and achievement in the arts.
4/2/2012
NCES 2012016 Restricted-Use Data Files and Documentation (FRSS 100): Elementary School Arts Education Survey: Fall 2009
This file contains data from a fast-response survey titled “Elementary School Arts Education Survey: Fall 2009.” This survey provides national estimates on student access to arts education and resources available for such instruction in public elementary schools during fall 2009. This is one of a set of seven surveys that collected data on arts education during the 2009–10 school year. In addition to this survey, the set includes a survey of secondary school principals, three elementary teacher-level surveys, and two secondary teacher-level surveys. NCES released the results of this set of surveys in the First Look report “A Snapshot of Arts Education in Public Elementary and Secondary Schools: 2009–10 (NCES 2011-078). A second report, released in April 2012, presents findings on a broader set of indicators. NCES is releasing separate data files for each of the seven surveys.

Questionnaires and cover letters for the study were mailed to the principal of each sampled elementary school in September 2009. The letter introduced the study and requested that the questionnaire be completed by the school principal. Respondents were offered the option of responding to the survey via the web or by mail. Telephone follow-up for survey nonresponse and data clarification was conducted from October 2009 through June 2010. The weighted response rate was 85 percent.

This study of arts education in public schools is the third of its kind to be conducted by NCES. Previous studies were conducted during the 1994–95 and the 1999–2000 school years. In addition to including many of the research questions from the previous study, the current study addresses emerging issues, such as the availability of curriculum-based arts education activities outside of regular school hours. The elementary school survey collected data on the availability and characteristics of music, visual arts, dance, and drama/theatre instruction; the type of space used for arts instruction; the availability of curriculum guides for arts teachers to follow; and whether those teaching the subject are arts specialists. Principals also reported on school or district provision of teacher professional development in the arts; arts education programs, activities, and events; and school-community partnerships.
4/2/2012
NCES 2011044 Restricted-Use Data Files and Documentation (FRSS 101): Secondary School Arts Education Survey
This file contains data from a fast-response survey titled "Secondary School Arts Education Survey: Fall 2009." This survey provides national estimates on student access to arts education and the resources available for such instruction in public secondary schools during fall 2009. This is one of a set of seven surveys that collected data on arts education during the 2009–10 school year. In addition to this survey, the set includes a survey of elementary school principals, three elementary teacher-level surveys, and two secondary teacher-level surveys. NCES released the results of this set of surveys in the First Look report “A Snapshot of Arts Education in Public Elementary and Secondary Schools: 2009–10” (NCES 2011-078). A second report, planned for early 2012, will present findings on a broader set of indicators. NCES is releasing separate data files for each of the seven surveys.

Questionnaires and cover letters for the study were mailed to the principal of each sampled secondary school in September 2009. The letter introduced the study and requested that the questionnaire be completed by the school principal. Respondents were offered the option of completing the survey via the web or by mail. Telephone follow-up for survey nonresponse and data clarification was conducted from October 2009 through June 2010. The weighted response rate was 89 percent.

This study is the third of its kind to be conducted by NCES. Previous studies were conducted during the 1994–95 and the 1999–2000 school years. In addition to including many of the research questions from the previous study, the current study addresses emerging issues, such as the availability of curriculum-based arts education activities outside of regular school hours. The secondary school survey collected data on the availability of music, visual arts, dance, and drama/theatre instruction; enrollment in these courses, the type of space used for arts instruction, the availability of curriculum guides for arts teachers to follow, and the number of arts teachers who are specialists in the subject. Principals reported on graduation requirements for coursework in the arts; school or district provision of teacher professional development in the arts; and arts education programs, activities, and events. Principals also reported on community partnerships and support from outside sources for arts education.
4/2/2012
NCES 2011043 Public-Use Data Files and Documentation (FRSS 101): Secondary School Arts Education Survey

This file contains data from a fast-response survey titled "Secondary School Arts Education Survey: Fall 2009." This survey provides national estimates on student access to arts education and the resources available for such instruction in public secondary schools during fall 2009. This is one of a set of seven surveys that collected data on arts education during the 2009–10 school year. In addition to this survey, the set includes a survey of elementary school principals, three elementary teacher-level surveys, and two secondary teacher-level surveys. NCES released the results of this set of surveys in the First Look report “A Snapshot of Arts Education in Public Elementary and Secondary Schools: 2009–10” (NCES 2011-078). A second report, planned for early 2012, will present findings on a broader set of indicators. NCES is releasing separate data files for each of the seven surveys.

Questionnaires and cover letters for the study were mailed to the principal of each sampled secondary school in September 2009. The letter introduced the study and requested that the questionnaire be completed by the school principal. Respondents were offered the option of completing the survey via the web or by mail. Telephone follow-up for survey nonresponse and data clarification was conducted from October 2009 through June 2010. The weighted response rate was 89 percent.

This study is the third of its kind to be conducted by NCES. Previous studies were conducted during the 1994–95 and the 1999–2000 school years. In addition to including many of the research questions from the previous study, the current study addresses emerging issues, such as the availability of curriculum-based arts education activities outside of regular school hours. The secondary school survey collected data on the availability of music, visual arts, dance, and drama/theatre instruction; enrollment in these courses, the type of space used for arts instruction, the availability of curriculum guides for arts teachers to follow, and the number of arts teachers who are specialists in the subject. Principals reported on graduation requirements for coursework in the arts; school or district provision of teacher professional development in the arts; and arts education programs, activities, and events. Principals also reported on community partnerships and support from outside sources for arts education.

7/25/2011
NCES 2011078 A Snapshot of Arts Education in Public Elementary and Secondary Schools: 2009–10
This first look report presents selected findings from a congressionally mandated study on arts education in public K–12 schools. The data were collected through seven Fast Response Survey System (FRSS) surveys during the 2009-10 school year. This report provides national data about arts education for public elementary and secondary schools, elementary classroom teachers, and elementary and secondary music and visual arts specialists. A later report will present findings on a broader set of indicators on the status of arts education in 2009–10 and comparisons with data from the 1999–2000 study where applicable.
5/2/2011
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