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 Pub Number  Title  Date
NCES 2018148 2015 Survey Questionnaires Results: Students’ Computer Access and Use
As part of the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), students, teachers, and school administrators answer survey questionnaires. These questionnaires collect contextual information to provide a better understanding of educational experiences and factors that are related to students’ learning both in and outside of the classroom and to allow for meaningful student group comparisons. For the 2015 NAEP mathematics and reading assessments, nationally representative samples of students answered a survey question about their access to computers at home, and their teachers answered a survey question about the availability of computers for them and their students in school. Additionally, students and teachers answered questions about their use of computers for classroom learning and instruction. This report, the second in a series, takes an in-depth look at their responses, providing additional information with the 2015 NAEP achievement results.
9/17/2018
NCES 2018118 Paths Through Mathematics and Science: Patterns and Relationships in High School Coursetaking
This report examines mathematics and science coursetaking in high school by providing a description of coursetaking within each of the mathematics and science subject areas in ninth, tenth, eleventh and twelfth grades, as well as by showing the association between early mathematics coursetaking and subsequent science coursetaking.

The report also describes coursetaking in engineering and technology, and the associations between coursetaking in these subject areas and in mathematics and science. The results are based on 2009 high school transcripts that are linked to 2009 NAEP mathematics and science 12th grade assessments.
6/19/2018
NCES 2018155 2015 Survey Questionnaires Results: Students’ Views of Mathematics, Reading, and Science
As part of the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), students, teachers, and school administrators answer survey questionnaires. These questionnaires collect contextual information to provide a better understanding of educational experiences and factors that are related to students’ learning both in and outside of the classroom and to allow for meaningful student group comparisons. For the 2015 NAEP mathematics, reading, and science assessments, nationally representative samples of students at grades 4, 8, and 12 answered survey questions about their views (i.e., levels of interest and enjoyment) of subject-related topics and activities. This report, the first in a series, takes an in-depth look at their responses, providing additional information with the 2015 NAEP achievement results.
6/12/2018
NCES 2018008 NAEP 2015 Science Restricted-Use Data Files (Y46SCI)
NAEP 2015 Science Restricted-Use Data Files (Y46SCI)
5/3/2018
NCES 2017094 Digest of Education Statistics, 2016
The 52nd in a series of publications initiated in 1962, the Digest's purpose is to provide a compilation of statistical information covering the broad field of education from prekindergarten through graduate school. The Digest contains data on a variety of topics, including the number of schools and colleges, teachers, enrollments, and graduates, in addition to educational attainment, finances, and federal funds for education, libraries, and international comparisons.
2/20/2018
REL 2018279 Associations between predictive indicators and postsecondary science, technology, engineering, and math success among Hispanic students in Texas
This study sought to identify factors that predict positive STEM-related postsecondary outcomes for students in Texas, and to determine whether the association between predictive factors and outcomes differs between Hispanic and non-Hispanic White students. The research team linked K–12 student academic data to college enrollment data for Texas public high school students who enrolled in colleges and universities in Texas during a period from the 2004/05 to the 2010/11 school years (seven cohorts). Regression models examined relationships between possible indicators (e.g., number and level of math or science classes completed) with the outcomes of interest (declaring a STEM major, persisting in a STEM major, and completing a STEM degree), while controlling for nonmalleable student and school factors as well as for cohort fixed effects. Interaction terms added to the models provided a separate estimate, for Hispanic, Black, non-Hispanic White, and Other ethnicity students, of the association of each indicator with each postsecondary outcome. Measures of academic experiences and performance in math and science during high school were strongly associated with postsecondary STEM outcomes. These associations were generally consistent for Hispanic and non-Hispanic White students. Statistically significant indicators of positive postsecondary STEM outcomes included number of math and science courses completed, number of Advanced Placement courses taken, highest-level math or science course taken, and state assessment scores. This study demonstrates that Hispanic students reap the same benefits of taking higher-level math and science courses in high school as do non-Hispanic White students. Future studies should consider possible factors influencing the academic experiences of Hispanic students in high school science and math, such as access to rigorous courses.
11/21/2017
NCES 2017087 The Nation’s Report Card: 2016 Arts Assessment at Grade 8

This online report presents the national results of eighth-grade students who participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2016 arts assessment. Results are presented separately for music and visual arts; an overall "arts" scale score is not reported. Although students were evaluated in two arts processes—responding and creating—average scores are presented on a 0–300 scale based on responding questions only. Visual arts results include an average creating task score reported as the average percentage maximum possible score from 0 to 100. Music and visual arts results are also presented as average responding scale scores for students performing at five selected percentiles (10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, and 90th). Along with overall scores, results are reported by race/ethnicity, gender, type of school, and other demographic groups.

In 2016, average responding scores for eighth-graders in both music and visual arts were not significantly different compared to 2008. In music, the average responding score in 2106 was higher for Hispanic students in comparison to 2008, while the average responding score for male students declined. Results for other reported student demographic groups in 2016 showed that the average responding score in music did not change significantly compared to 2008. In visual arts, the average responding score in 2016 did not change significantly for most reported student demographic groups compared to 2008, but it was higher for students eligible for the National School Lunch Program (NSLP).

In both music and visual arts, score gaps between White and Hispanic students in 2016 narrowed in comparison to 2008, and female students scored higher on average than their male peers in both areas. In visual arts, the score gap between students who were eligible for NSLP and students who were not eligible narrowed compared to 2008. In 2016, students from the Northeast scored higher on average than their peers from the South, Midwest, and West in visual arts, and students from the Northeast scored higher on average than their peers from the West in music.

4/25/2017
NCES 2016014 Digest of Education Statistics, 2015
The 51st in a series of publications initiated in 1962, the Digest's purpose is to provide a compilation of statistical information covering the broad field of education from prekindergarten through graduate school. The Digest contains data on a variety of topics, including the number of schools and colleges, teachers, enrollments, and graduates, in addition to educational attainment, finances, and federal funds for education, libraries, and international comparisons.
12/8/2016
NCES 2017048 Performance of U.S. 15-Year-Old Students in Science, Reading, and Mathematics Literacy in an International Context: First Look at PISA 2015
This report provides international comparisons of student performance in science, reading, and mathematics literacy from the PISA 2015 assessment. In 2015, 70 education systems, including the United States, participated in PISA. In addition, Massachusetts, North Carolina, and Puerto Rico participated in PISA separately from the nation.

The report includes average scores in the three subject areas; score gaps across the three subject areas between the top (90th percentile) and low performing (10th percentile) students; the percentages of students reaching selected PISA proficiency levels; and trends in U.S. performance in the three subjects over time.

Additional findings from PISA 2015 are available on the NCES PISA website at http://nces.ed.gov/surveys/pisa/pisa2015/.
12/6/2016
NCES 2016157 NAEP Science 2015 State Snapshot Reports
Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the NAEP 2015 Science assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. The reports in this series provide bulleted text describing overall student results, bar charts showing NAEP achievement levels for selected years in which the state participated, and tables displaying results by gender, race/ethnicity, and eligibility for free/reduced-price lunch. In addition, bulleted text describes the trends in average scale score gaps by gender, race/ethnicity, and eligibility for free/reduced-price lunch. A map comparing the average score in 2015 to other states/jurisdictions is also displayed.
10/27/2016
NCES 2016162 The Nation’s Report Card: 2015 Science at Grades 4, 8 and 12
This report presents results from the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2015 science assessment. The report includes national and state results on the performance of fourth-, eighth-, and twelfth-grade students. Results are presented in terms of average scores and as percentages of students performing at or above the three NAEP achievement levels: Basic, Proficient, and Advanced. In addition to overall scores, results are reported by race/ethnicity, gender, type of school, and other demographic groups. The 2015 trend in national average science scores showed increases at grades 4 and 8 since 2009 and at grade 8 since 2011. There was no significant change in the average science score for twelfth-grade students. Compared to 2009, scores in 2015 were higher at grades 4 and 8 in all three science content areas (physical science, life science, and Earth and space sciences), while there were no significant changes in content area scores at grade 12. Scores for most student groups at grades 4 and 8 were higher compared to 2009, but were not significantly different at grade 12. At grades 4 and 8, Black and Hispanic students made greater gains than White students, causing the achievement gap to narrow in comparison to 2009. In 2015, the gender score gap remained at grades 8 and 12, and there was no difference between male and female student scores at grade 4. Results for states/jurisdictions in 2015 showed that 18 states/jurisdictions scored higher at grade 4 and 24 states/jurisdictions scored higher at grade 8 compared to 2009; compared to 2011, twelve states/jurisdictions scored higher at grade 8.
10/27/2016
NCES 2016006 Digest of Education Statistics, 2014
The 50th in a series of publications initiated in 1962, the Digest's purpose is to provide a compilation of statistical information covering the broad field of education from prekindergarten through graduate school. The Digest contains data on a variety of topics, including the number of schools and colleges, teachers, enrollments, and graduates, in addition to educational attainment, finances, and federal funds for education, libraries, and international comparisons.
4/28/2016
REL 2016122 A Review of the Literature to Identify Leading Indicators Related to Hispanic STEM Postsecondary Educational Outcomes
The purpose of this study was to review recent peer-reviewed studies in order to identify malleable factors measured in K–12 settings that are related to students' postsecondary STEM success, particularly for Hispanic students. Postsecondary STEM success was defined as enrollment in, persistence in, and completion of postsecondary STEM majors or degrees. Twenty-three relevant studies were identified, yet only 4 examined K–12 factors predictive of postsecondary STEM success specifically for Hispanic students. The review found that the number of high school mathematics and science courses taken, and the level of those courses is a consistent predictor of postsecondary STEM outcomes for all student subgroups. However, the literature indicates that minority students, including Hispanics, were less likely to take the highest-level mathematics and science courses. Students' interest and confidence in STEM at the K–12 levels was also predictive of postsecondary STEM success. Yet, despite lower levels of postsecondary STEM success, some studies indicate racial/ethnic minority and White students had similar levels of interest and confidence in STEM. The reviewed research suggests that reducing disparities in mathematics and science preparation between Hispanic and White students and increasing the rates at which Hispanic students take high-level mathematics and science classes has promise for informing interventions designed to improve STEM outcomes.
4/19/2016
NCES 2016105 NAEP Technical Documentation
This section of the NAEP website, technical documentation on the web (TDW), is written for researchers and assumes knowledge of educational measurement and testing. TDW contains information about the technical procedures and methods of NAEP. The TDW site is organized by topic (from Instruments through Analysis and Scaling) with subtopics, including information specific to a particular assessment. Each page has a link for previewing a printer-friendly version, if you wish to print. To view all contents currently available on the TDW website in a single display, click on the Table of Contents link.
2/25/2016
NCER 20162000 A Compendium of Math and Science Research Funded by NCER and NCSER: 2002–2013
Between 2002 and 2013, the Institute of Education Sciences (Institute) funded over 300 projects focused on math and science through the National Center for Education Research (NCER) and the National Center for Special Education Research (NCSER). Together, researchers funded by NCER and NCSER have developed or tested more than 215 instructional interventions (e.g., packaged curricula, intervention frameworks, and instructional approaches), 75 professional development programs, 165 educational technologies, and 65 assessments in math and science. NCER commissioned the development of this compendium with the intent to present information in a structured, accessible, and usable manner. This compendium organizes information on the NCER and NCSER projects into two main sections: Mathematics and Science. Within each section, projects are sorted into chapters based on content area, grade level, and intended outcome. The compendium also includes multiple appendices and an index to help readers locate specific types of information (e.g., projects that focus on English language learners, specific interventions).
10/23/2015
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