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 Pub Number  Title  Date
NCES 2016138 First-Time Postsecondary Students in 2011–12: Three-Year Persistence and Attainment at Any Institution

This set of Web Tables is the third in a series of four that together provide key information about first-time postsecondary students' characteristics and their 3-year retention, persistence, attainment, withdrawal, stopout, and transfer rates. This particular set of Web Tables highlights 3-year persistence and attainment rates at any institution attended for all 2011–12 first-time postsecondary students; for students beginning at institutions of different control (i.e., public, private nonprofit, and for-profit) and level (e.g., less-than-2-year, 2-year, 4-year); for students beginning in different degree programs; and for recent high school graduates starting in a bachelor's degree program. The tables indicate the percentage of 2011–12 first-time postsecondary students who attained a certificate, an associate's degree, or a bachelor's degree at any institution by spring 2014. They also show whether those who had not yet attained a credential were enrolled at a 4-year institution, enrolled at a less-than-4-year institution, or not enrolled in spring 2014.

The first set of Web Tables in this series, entitled First-Time Postsecondary Students in 2011–12: A Profile (https://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2016136), provides a profile of America's first-time postsecondary students.

The second set of Web Tables, entitled First-Time Postsecondary Students in 2011–12: Three-Year Retention and Attainment at First Institution (https://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2016137), presents 3-year retention and attainment rates at the first institution students attended.

The final set of Web Tables, entitled First-Time Postsecondary Students in 2011–12: Three-Year Withdrawal, Stopout, and Transfer Rates (https://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2016139), presents the year-by-year cumulative rates at which first-time students withdrew from postsecondary education without a degree and the rate at which students stopout or transfer.

9/26/2016
NCES 2016139 First-Time Postsecondary Students in 2011–12: Three-Year Withdrawal, Stopout, and Transfer Rates

This set of Web Tables is the fourth in a series of four that together provide key information about first-time postsecondary students' characteristics and their 3-year retention, persistence, attainment, withdrawal, stopout, and transfer rates. This particular set of Web Tables has two sections. Section 1 focuses on withdrawal, presenting the year-by-year cumulative rates at which first-time students withdrew from postsecondary education without a degree for all 2011–12 first-time postsecondary institution and for students at institutions that vary by control (i.e., public, private nonprofit, and for-profit) and level (e.g., less-than-2-year, 2-year, 4-year). Section 2 of these Web Tables explores stopout and transfer.

The first set of Web Tables in this series, entitled First-Time Postsecondary Students in 2011–12: A Profile (https://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2016136), provides a profile of America's first-time postsecondary students.

The second set of Web Tables, entitled First-Time Postsecondary Students in 2011–12: Three-Year Retention and Attainment at First Institution (https://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2016137), presents 3-year retention and attainment rates at the first institution students attended.

The third set of Web Tables, entitled First-Time Postsecondary Students in 2011–12: Three-Year Persistence and Attainment at Any Institution (https://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2016138), highlights 3-year persistence and attainment rates at any institution attended.

9/26/2016
NCES 2016435 After the Post-9/11 GI Bill: A Profile of Military Service Members and Veterans Enrolled in Undergraduate and Graduate Education
This Statistics in Brief examines military service members’ and veterans’ enrollment in undergraduate and graduate education and their use of Veterans’ education benefits before and after the Post-9/11 GI Bill was implemented (2007–08 and 2011–12). The report also compares military students and their nonmilitary counterparts’ enrollment patterns, demographics, disability status, and participation in online education.
8/30/2016
NCES 2016415 A Profile of Military Undergraduates: 2011–12
These Web Tables provide key statistics on military students enrolled as undergraduates, focusing on military students enrolled after the enactment of the Post-9/11 GI Bill. The tables use nationally representative student-level data from the 2011–12 National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS:12) to detail military students’ demographic and enrollment characteristics and examine their use of Veterans’ education benefits and other student aid. They enable comparisons both among military students—active duty, veteran, reserve, and National Guard personnel—and between military students and nonmilitary students. The tables provide estimates on undergraduate students who received Veterans’ and Department of Defense education benefits as eligible beneficiaries.
7/1/2016
NCES 2016404 2012/14 Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study (BPS:12/14) Restricted-Use Data File
The 2012/14 Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study (BPS:12/14) restricted-use data file contains data on a nationally representative sample of students who began postsecondary education for the first time in the 2011–12 academic year. These students were first surveyed as part of the National Postsecondary Student Aid Study and BPS:12/14 is the first follow-up of these students three years later in 2014. These record-level data allow users to explore topics related to persistence, attainment, and retention in postsecondary education over three academic years, from 2011–12 to 2013–14.
5/31/2016
NCES 2016062 2012/14 Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study (BPS:12/14) Data File Documentation
This publication describes the methodology used in the 2012/14 Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study (BPS:12/14). BPS:12/14 is the first follow-up study of students who began postsecondary education in the 2011 – 12 academic year. These students were first interviewed as part of the 2011 – 12 National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS:12). In particular, this report details the methodology and outcomes of the BPS:12/14 sample design, student interview design, student interview data collection processes, administrative records matching, data file processing, and weighting procedures.
5/31/2016
NCES 2016144 The Condition of Education 2016
NCES has a mandate to report to Congress on the condition of education by June 1 of each year. The Condition of Education 2016 summarizes important developments and trends in education using the latest available data. The 2016 report presents 43 key indicators on the status and condition of education and are grouped under four main areas: (1) population characteristics, (2) participation in education, (3) elementary and secondary education, and (4) postsecondary education. Also included in the report are 3 Spotlight indicators that provide a more in-depth look at some of the data.
5/26/2016
NCES 2016006 Digest of Education Statistics, 2014
The 50th in a series of publications initiated in 1962, the Digest's purpose is to provide a compilation of statistical information covering the broad field of education from prekindergarten through graduate school. The Digest contains data on a variety of topics, including the number of schools and colleges, teachers, enrollments, and graduates, in addition to educational attainment, finances, and federal funds for education, libraries, and international comparisons.
4/28/2016
REL 2016122 A Review of the Literature to Identify Leading Indicators Related to Hispanic STEM Postsecondary Educational Outcomes
The purpose of this study was to review recent peer-reviewed studies in order to identify malleable factors measured in K–12 settings that are related to students' postsecondary STEM success, particularly for Hispanic students. Postsecondary STEM success was defined as enrollment in, persistence in, and completion of postsecondary STEM majors or degrees. Twenty-three relevant studies were identified, yet only 4 examined K–12 factors predictive of postsecondary STEM success specifically for Hispanic students. The review found that the number of high school mathematics and science courses taken, and the level of those courses is a consistent predictor of postsecondary STEM outcomes for all student subgroups. However, the literature indicates that minority students, including Hispanics, were less likely to take the highest-level mathematics and science courses. Students' interest and confidence in STEM at the K–12 levels was also predictive of postsecondary STEM success. Yet, despite lower levels of postsecondary STEM success, some studies indicate racial/ethnic minority and White students had similar levels of interest and confidence in STEM. The reviewed research suggests that reducing disparities in mathematics and science preparation between Hispanic and White students and increasing the rates at which Hispanic students take high-level mathematics and science classes has promise for informing interventions designed to improve STEM outcomes.
4/19/2016
REL 2016114 Alaska students' pathways from high school to postsecondary education and employment
This study follows Alaskan students in their first six years after high school to describe the pathways they took to postsecondary education and careers. Analyzing data from multiple national and state education and employment sources, the study examines the trajectories of 40,000 students who exited public high schools in Alaska from 2004/05 to 2007/08. The analysis shows that students followed more than 3,000 unique postsecondary pathways. Over two-thirds of the students (67 percent) graduated from high school and most either enrolled in postsecondary education or entered the workforce in the state immediately after graduation. Female students, White students, and urban students were more likely than male students, Alaska Native students, and rural students to enroll in college, respectively. However, students from each of these groups with similar academic and personal background characteristics had similar probabilities of enrolling directly after high school. In addition, students who earned a postsecondary degree tended to have higher early-career employment rates and wages than students who did not earn a degree. The findings provide evidence to inform policy and practice related to academic readiness and closing the gap in postsecondary enrollment rates between Alaska Native students and their White peers.
3/22/2016
NCES 2016401 Persistence and Attainment of 2011–12 First-Time Postsecondary Students After 3 Years (BPS:12/14)
This publication provides descriptive findings from the 2012/14 Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study (BPS:12/14) focusing on attainment, persistence, and retention in postsecondary education. BPS:12/14 is a nationally representative longitudinal sample survey of students who began postsecondary education for the first time during the 2011–12 academic year; this first follow-up represents students’ experiences about 3 years after their initial enrollment. Among 2011–12 first-time postsecondary students, 7 percent had completed a certificate, 7 percent had completed an associate’s degree, and 1 percent had completed a bachelor’s degree at any institution within 3 years. Another 39 percent had not earned a credential and were enrolled at a 4-year institution, 16 percent were enrolled at a less-than-4-year institution, and 30 percent were not enrolled at any institution by the spring of 2014.
1/12/2016
NCES 2015604 Trends in Undergraduate Nonfederal Grant and Scholarship Aid by Demographic and Enrollment Characteristics, Selected Years: 1999-2000 to 2011-12
This set of Web Tables presents trend data on nonfederal grant and scholarship aid awarded to undergraduate students between 1999-2000 and 2011-12. Nonfederal grant and scholarship aid is financial aid awarded by states, institutions, employers, and private organizations. Grants and scholarships, unlike loans, do not need to be repaid and are traditionally awarded on the basis of financial need, merit (e.g., academic or athletic), or a combination of need and merit. Estimates in these tables include the percentage of undergraduates who received nonfederal aid and the average amounts they received, by aid type (need- or merit-based), source (state, institution, or private organization), and selected student characteristics, such as sex, dependency status, income, institution type, and enrollment intensity.
9/9/2015
NCES 2015025 Demographic and Enrollment Characteristics of Nontraditional Undergraduates: 2011-12
This set of Web Tables provides an array of descriptive statistics about undergraduates with nontraditional characteristics enrolled in the 2011-12 academic year. The tables present the percentage and distribution of undergraduates who possess specific nontraditional characteristics by demographic, enrollment, and academic characteristics.
9/9/2015
NCES 2015011 Digest of Education Statistics, 2013
The 49th in a series of publications initiated in 1962, the Digest's purpose is to provide a compilation of statistical information covering the broad field of education from prekindergarten through graduate school. The Digest contains data on a variety of topics, including the number of schools and colleges, teachers, enrollments, and graduates, in addition to educational attainment, finances, and federal funds for education, libraries, and international comparisons.
5/7/2015
NCES 2015165 What Is the Price of College? Total, Net, and Out-of-Pocket Prices by Type of Institution in 2011–12
This report describes three measures of the price of undergraduate education in the 2011–12 academic year: total price of attendance (tuition and living expenses), net price of attendance after all grants, and out-of-pocket net price after all financial aid. It is based on the 2011–12 National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS:12), a nationally representative study of students enrolled in postsecondary institutions in the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Students are grouped into four institution types: public 2-year institutions, public 4-year institutions, private nonprofit 4-year institutions, and for-profit institutions at all levels (less-than-2-year, 2-year, and 4-year).
3/26/2015
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