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 Pub Number  Title  Date
NCES 2018137 Teachers' jobs outside their school system
This report describes the percentage of teachers who earned income from working outside their school system, whether the job was related to teaching or not, and earnings from those jobs by region.
6/19/2018
NCES 2018116 Teacher Satisfaction With Salary and Current Job
This report describes the percentage of teachers who are satisfied with their salary for teaching and compares the job satisfaction of teachers who are satisfied and dissatisfied with their teaching salary.
5/29/2018
NCES 2018097 Public School Teacher Spending on Classroom Supplies
This report describes the percentage of public school teachers who spend their own money on classroom supplies without reimbursement, and the amount of money spent by these teachers.
5/15/2018
NCES 2018019 Projections of Education Statistics to 2026
Projections of Education Statistics to 2026 is the 45th in a series of publications initiated in 1964. This publication provides national-level data on enrollment, teachers, high school graduates, and expenditures at the elementary and secondary level, and enrollment and degrees at the postsecondary level for the past 15 years and projections to the year 2026. For the 50 states and the District of Columbia, the tables, figures, and text contain data on projections of public elementary and secondary enrollment and public high school graduates to the year 2026. The methodology section describes models and assumptions used to develop national- and state-level projections.
4/12/2018
NCES 2018143 Preparation and Support for Teachers in Public Schools: Reflections on the First Year of Teaching
This Statistics in Brief investigates early-career teachers’ preparation for teaching and receipt of support by selected characteristics of the schools in which they taught during the 2011–12 school year.
4/3/2018
NCES 2018120 An Evaluation of Data From the Teacher Compensation Survey: School Year 2007-08 through 2009-
This Research and Development report summarizes the results of the data collected through NCES’ Teacher Compensation Survey (TCS) for the 2007-08, 2008-09 and 2009-10 school years. It provides an overview of the survey methodology; comparisons of TCS data with other data sources; a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of TCS data; and findings and descriptive statistics from the years of data collected.
3/27/2018
REL 20184009 Promoting Educator Effectiveness: The Effects of Two Key Strategies
The Teacher Incentive Fund (TIF) and its successor, the Teacher and School Leader (TSL) Incentive program, provide grants to support performance-based compensation systems or human capital management systems for teachers and principals in high-need schools. The evaluation brief synthesizes two recently completed National Center for Education Evaluation (NCEE) impact studies. One study focused on a strategy of providing educators with feedback on their performance for two years. The other study focused on a strategy of providing educators with bonuses for four years based on their performance.
3/21/2018
NCES 2018103 Public School Teacher Autonomy, Satisfaction, Job Security, and Commitment: 1999–2000 and 2011–12
This Statistics in Brief highlights changes in teacher autonomy, satisfaction, job security, and commitment between 1999–2000 and 2011–12. The report focuses on patterns between perceived level of autonomy and perceptions of job security, satisfaction, and commitment. This report relies on a sample of U.S. public school teachers using data collected through the 1999–2000 and 2011–12 Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS) Public School Teacher Questionnaire.
3/6/2018
NCES 2017094 Digest of Education Statistics, 2016
The 52nd in a series of publications initiated in 1962, the Digest's purpose is to provide a compilation of statistical information covering the broad field of education from prekindergarten through graduate school. The Digest contains data on a variety of topics, including the number of schools and colleges, teachers, enrollments, and graduates, in addition to educational attainment, finances, and federal funds for education, libraries, and international comparisons.
2/20/2018
REL 2018284 Teacher certification and academic growth among English learner students in the Houston Independent School District
This study assesses whether a teacher’s certification type (that is, being a certified bilingual teacher or a certified English as a second language [ESL] teacher) and route to certification—alternative, postbaccalaureate, traditional, or additional exam—correlate with academic growth and growth in English proficiency among English learner students in the Houston Independent School District (HISD). The student sample consisted of HISD students in grades 4 or 5 during the 2005/06–2014/15 school years who were classified as English learner students, participated in HISD's bilingual or ESL program in grades 4 or 5, and had Spanish as their home language. Data from the four most recent cohorts (2011/12–2014/15) were used for the analyses of mathematics and reading outcomes using the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) assessment program. All cohorts were used for the analyses of the English proficiency outcomes using the Texas English Language Proficiency Assessment System assessment. The corresponding teacher sample consisted of HISD teachers who taught mathematics or reading to the student sample described. The study used student achievement models, sometimes called value-added specifications, to examine whether specific teacher certification types and routes were associated with larger achievement gains.

For math, having a teacher with bilingual certification was associated with higher student growth in achievement in grade 4 but lower growth in achievement in grade 5 compared with having a teacher without bilingual or English as a second language certification. Having a teacher with bilingual certification through the alternative route was associated with the highest growth in achievement in grade 4 math. For reading, having a teacher with bilingual certification was associated with higher student growth in achievement in grade 4 compared with having a teacher without bilingual or English as a second language certification. Having a teacher with bilingual certification through the traditional route was associated with the highest growth in achievement in grade 4 reading. For English proficiency, having a teacher with bilingual certification through the postbaccalaureate route was associated with the highest student growth in grade 4. Having a teacher with bilingual certification through the alternative route was associated with the highest growth in English proficiency in grade 5.

Given the inconsistent results, there are no clear implications for practice. Additional research might investigate alternate methods for identifying which teachers are effective.
2/13/2018
REL 2018285 Impact of a checklist on principal–teacher feedback conferences following classroom observations
In partnership with the New Mexico Public Education Department, Regional Educational Laboratory (REL) Southwest researchers conducted a statewide experiment in school year 2015/16 to test impacts of a checklist on the feedback conferences principals had with teachers after formal classroom observations. Of the 336 participating schools in New Mexico, the REL Southwest researchers selected half at random in fall 2015 as the treatment group. All school leaders in the treatment group received the checklist as an email attachment, plus a hyperlink to a three-minute principal testimonial video. School leaders in the control group received an email attachment with a guide that reprised the five tips about feedback included in the mandatory New Mexico Public Education Department-sponsored professional development. As of one year later, the checklist had few clear impacts on the quality of feedback, professional development outcomes, instructional practice, and student achievement. The exceptions are that teachers who received the checklist reported that their principals were less likely to dominate the feedback conferences, and reported that they were more likely to follow their principals’ professional development recommendation. The overall usage of the feedback checklist was moderate, with about three-quarters of principals who were encouraged to use the checklist reporting that they saw it, and 58 percent reported using it in post-observation feedback sessions with at least a few teachers. This study suggests that if school districts or state departments of education wish to change school leaders’ feedback conferences with teachers, they need to invest in more substantial training for their school leaders.
1/23/2018
NCES 2018052 Selected Statistics From the Public Elementary and Secondary Education Universe: School Year 2015-16
This First Look report introduces new data concerning public elementary and secondary education in the United States in school year 2015-16.
12/26/2017
NCEE 20184004 Evaluation of the Teacher Incentive Fund: Final Report on Implementation and Impacts of Pay-for-Performance Across Four Years
The Teacher Incentive Fund (TIF) provides grants to support performance-based compensation systems for teachers and principals in high-need schools. The study measures the impact of pay-for-performance bonuses as part of a comprehensive compensation system within a large, multisite random assignment study design. The treatment schools were to fully implement their performance-based compensation system. The control schools were to implement the same performance-based compensation system with one exception—”the pay-for-performance bonus component was replaced with a one percent bonus paid to all educators regardless of performance. The report provides implementation and impact information after four school years. Implementation was similar across the four years, with most districts implementing at least 3 of the 4 required components for teachers. In a subset of 10 districts participating in the random assignment study, educators' understanding of performance measures improved over time. However, many teachers were unaware that they were eligible for a bonus, and their understanding did not improve after the second year of implementation. Teachers also underestimated the maximum amount they could earn. The pay-for-performance bonus policy had small, positive impacts on students' reading and math achievement.
12/19/2017
NCEE 20184001 The Impact of Providing Performance Feedback to Teachers and Principals: Final Report
This is a study of the implementation and impacts of a set of three educator performance measures: observations of teachers' classroom practices, value-added measures of teacher performance, and a 360-degree survey assessment of principals' leadership practices. A set of elementary and middle schools within each of eight districts were randomly assigned to either a treatment group in which the study's performance measures were implemented for two years or a control group in which they were not. In treatment schools, the study's measures were generally implemented for formative purposes, without formal stakes attached. A total of 127 schools participated in the study. This report provides findings on implementation of the measures and impacts of the feedback from those measures on educator and student outcomes. The study's performance measures were generally implemented as planned. All three measures differentiated educator performance, although the observation scores and principal leadership measure did not provide consistent feedback to educators on specific areas for improvement. Feedback from the study's measures had some positive impacts on teachers' classroom practice, principals' leadership, and student achievement. For instance, in Year 1, the intervention had a positive impact on students' achievement in mathematics, amounting to about four weeks of learning. In Year 2, the impact on mathematics achievement was similar in magnitude but not statistically significant. There was no impact in either year on reading/English language arts achievement.
12/19/2017
REL 2018283 Trends in teacher mobility in Texas and associations with teacher, student, and school characteristics
This study provides updated information regarding teacher mobility—defined as teachers moving schools or leaving the public-school system—for Texas public schools during the 2011/12 through 2015/16 school years. Descriptive information on mobility rates is presented at the regional and state levels for each school year. Mobility rates are disaggregated further into destination proportions to describe the proportion of teacher mobility due to within-district movement, between-district movement, and leaving Texas public schools. This study leverages data collected by the Texas Education Agency during the pilot of the Texas Teacher Evaluation and Support System (T-TESS) in 57 school districts in 2014/15. Analyses examine how components of the T-TESS observation rubric are related to school-level teacher mobility rates. During the 2011/12 school year, about 18.7 percent of Texas teachers moved schools within a district, moved between districts, or left the Texas Public School system. By 2015/16, this mobility rate had increased to 22.0 percent. Moving between districts was the primary driver of the increase in mobility rates. Results indicate significant links between mobility and teacher, student, and school demographic characteristics. Teachers with special education certifications left Texas public schools at nearly twice the rate of teachers with other teaching certifications. School-level mobility rates showed significant positive correlations with the proportion of special education, economically disadvantaged, low-performing, and minority students. School-level mobility rates were negatively correlated with the proportion of English learner students. Schools with higher overall observation ratings on the T-TESS rubric tended to have lower mobility rates. Findings from this study will provide state and district policymakers in Texas with updated information about trends and correlates of mobility in the teaching workforce, and offer a systematic baseline for monitoring and planning for future changes. Informed by these findings, policymakers can formulate a more strategic and targeted approach for recruiting and retaining teachers. For instance, instead of using generic approaches to enhance the overall supply of teachers or improve recruitment, more targeted efforts to attract and retain teachers in specific subject areas (for example, special education), in certain stages of their career (for example, novice teachers), and in certain geographic areas are likely to be more productive. Moreover, this analysis may enrich the existing knowledge base about schools’ teacher retention and mobility in relation to the quality of their teaching force, or may inform policy discussions about the importance of a stable teaching force for teaching effectiveness.
12/19/2017
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