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 Pub Number  Title  Date
NCES 2019047 Indicators of School Crime and Safety: 2018
A joint effort by the National Center for Education Statistics and the Bureau of Justice Statistics, this annual report examines crime occurring in schools and colleges. This report presents data on crime at school from the perspectives of students, teachers, principals, and the general population from an array of sources—the National Crime Victimization Survey, the School Crime Supplement to the National Crime Victimization Survey, the Youth Risk Behavior Survey, the School Survey on Crime and Safety, the Schools and Staffing Survey, EDFacts, and the Campus Safety and Security Survey. The report covers topics such as victimization, bullying, school conditions, fights, weapons, the presence of security staff at school, availability and student use of drugs and alcohol, student perceptions of personal safety at school, and criminal incidents at postsecondary institutions.
4/17/2019
NCES 2019053 Cyberbullying and Cell Phone Policy in U.S. Primary and Secondary Schools
This report describes principals’ reports of the frequency with which cyberbullying occurred among U.S. students in 2010 and 2016. Additionally, this report examines schools with more frequent reports of cyberbullying and compares groups of schools with varying racial/ethnic compositions and rules prohibiting cell phone use during school hours.
1/29/2019
NCES 2018098 Measuring School Climate Using the 2015 School Crime Supplement: Technical Report
This report uses data from the 2015 School Crime Supplement (SCS) to the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) to develop school climate measures and identify differences in scores for various student demographics including students experiencing or not experiencing criminal victimization and bullying.
10/30/2018
NCES 2018036 Indicators of School Crime and Safety: 2017
A joint effort by the National Center for Education Statistics and the Bureau of Justice Statistics, this annual report examines crime occurring in schools and colleges. This report presents data on crime at school from the perspectives of students, teachers, principals, and the general population from an array of sources—the National Crime Victimization Survey, the School Crime Supplement to the National Crime Victimization Survey, the Youth Risk Behavior Survey, the School Survey on Crime and Safety, the Schools and Staffing Survey, EDFacts, and the Campus Safety and Security Survey. The report covers topics such as victimization, bullying, school conditions, fights, weapons, the presence of security staff at school, availability and student use of drugs and alcohol, student perceptions of personal safety at school, and criminal incidents at postsecondary institutions.
3/29/2018
NCES 2018106REV Student Victimization in U.S. Schools: Results From the 2015 School Crime Supplement to the National Crime Victimization Survey
This report uses data from the 2015 School Crime Supplement (SCS) to the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) to examine student criminal victimization and the characteristics of crime victims and nonvictims. It also provides findings on student reports of the presence of gangs and weapons and the availability of drugs and alcohol at school, student reports of bullying, and fear and avoidance behaviors of crime victims and nonvictims at school.
1/2/2018
NCES 2017129 2015-16 School Survey on Crime and Safety (SSOCS) Restricted-Use Data Files and User's Manual
This CD contains restricted-use data for the 2015-16 School Survey on Crime and Safety (SSOCS) in SAS and ASCII formats (NCES 2017-129). It also contains the 2015-16 SSOCS Restricted-Use Data File User's Manual (NCES 2017-129).
12/8/2017
NCES 2017064 Indicators of School Crime and Safety: 2016
A joint effort by the National Center for Education Statistics and the Bureau of Justice Statistics, this annual report examines crime occurring in schools and colleges. This report presents data on crime at school from the perspectives of students, teachers, principals, and the general population from an array of sources—the National Crime Victimization Survey, the School Crime Supplement to the National Crime Victimization Survey, the Youth Risk Behavior Survey, the School Survey on Crime and Safety, the Schools and Staffing Survey, EDFacts, and the Campus Safety and Security Survey. The report covers topics such as victimization, bullying, school conditions, fights, weapons, the presence of security staff at school, availability and student use of drugs and alcohol, student perceptions of personal safety at school, and criminal incidents at postsecondary institutions.
5/16/2017
REL 2017240 School discipline data indicators: A guide for districts and schools
Disproportionate rates of suspension for students of color are a local, state, and national concern. In particular, African American, Hispanic/Latino(a), and American Indian students experience suspensions more frequently than their White peers. Disciplinary actions that remove students from classroom instruction undermine their academic achievement and weaken their connection with school. This REL Northwest guide is designed to help educators use data to reduce disproportionate rates of suspension and expulsion based on race or ethnicity. It provides examples of selecting and analyzing data to determine whether racial disproportionality exists in a school or district's discipline practices. The guide also describes how to apply the Plan-Do-Study-Act continuous improvement cycle to inform intervention decisions and monitor progress toward desired outcomes.
4/14/2017
REL 2017263 Analyzing student-level disciplinary data: A guide for districts
The purpose of this report is to help guide districts in analyzing their own student-level disciplinary data to answer important questions about the use of disciplinary actions. This report, developed in collaboration with the Regional Educational Laboratory Northeast and Islands Urban School Improvement Alliance, provides information to district personnel about how to analyze their student-level data and answer questions about the use of disciplinary actions, such as whether these actions are disproportionately applied to some student subgroups, and whether there are differences in student academic outcomes across the types of disciplinary actions that students receive. This report identifies several considerations that should be accounted for prior to conducting any analysis of student-level disciplinary data. These include defining all data elements to be used in the analysis, establishing rules for transparency (including handling missing data), and defining the unit-of-analysis. The report also covers examples of descriptive analyses that can be conducted by districts to answer questions about their use of the disciplinary actions. SPSS syntax is provided to assist districts in conducting all of the analyses described in the report. The report will help guide districts to design and carry out their own analyses, or to engage in conversations with external researchers who are studying disciplinary data in their districts.
3/29/2017
NCES 2016144 The Condition of Education 2016
NCES has a mandate to report to Congress on the condition of education by June 1 of each year. The Condition of Education 2016 summarizes important developments and trends in education using the latest available data. The 2016 report presents 43 key indicators on the status and condition of education and are grouped under four main areas: (1) population characteristics, (2) participation in education, (3) elementary and secondary education, and (4) postsecondary education. Also included in the report are 3 Spotlight indicators that provide a more in-depth look at some of the data.
5/26/2016
NCES 2016079 Indicators of School Crime and Safety: 2015
A joint effort by the Bureau of Justice Statistics and National Center for Education Statistics, this annual report examines crime occurring in schools and colleges. This report presents data on crime at school from the perspectives of students, teachers, principals, and the general population from an array of sources--the National Crime Victimization Survey, the School Crime Supplement to the National Crime Victimization Survey, the Youth Risk Behavior Survey, the School Survey on Crime and Safety, the Schools and Staffing Survey, EDFacts, and the Campus Safety and Security Survey. The report covers topics such as victimization, bullying, school conditions, fights, weapons, the presence of security staff at school, availability and student use of drugs and alcohol, student perceptions of personal safety at school, and criminal incidents at postsecondary institutions.
5/4/2016
REL 2016112 Stated Briefly: Suspension, Expulsion, and Achievement of English Learner Students in Six Oregon Districts
The "Stated Briefly" report is a companion piece that summarizes the results of another report of the same name. This study examines the rates of exclusionary discipline (i.e., suspensions and expulsions) among English learners and non-English learners in six diverse Oregon districts that serve a third of the state's English learner students. Using 2011/12 databases from the Oregon Department of Education, the study found that differences in suspension and expulsion rates between English learners and non-English learners were much larger in middle school and high school than in elementary school. Approximately 3 percent of English learners and non-English learners were suspended or expelled in elementary school. In middle school, 18 percent of English learners and 11 percent of non-English learners were suspended or expelled, while in high school 14 percent of English learners and 8 percent of non-English learners were suspended or expelled. In addition, English learners in high school were suspended for almost a full day more than non-English learners. Overall, the findings suggest that educators, parents, and community members should examine discipline policies and practices to see if they are being applied inequitably and consider extra supports for any student who is expelled or suspended.
11/17/2015
NCES 2015072 Indicators of School Crime and Safety: 2014
A joint effort by the Bureau of Justice Statistics and National Center for Education Statistics, this annual report examines crime occurring in schools and colleges. This report presents data on crime at school from the perspectives of students, teachers, principals, and the general population from an array of sources--the National Crime Victimization Survey, the School Crime Supplement to the National Crime Victimization Survey, the Youth Risk Behavior Survey, the School Survey on Crime and Safety, the Schools and Staffing Survey, EDFacts, and the Campus Safety and Security Survey. The report covers topics such as victimization, bullying, school conditions, fights, weapons, the presence of security staff at school, availability and student use of drugs and alcohol, student perceptions of personal safety at school, and criminal incidents at postsecondary institutions.
7/9/2015
WWC IRCWD628 Fast Track: Elementary School
Fast Track is a comprehensive intervention designed to reduce conduct problems and promote academic, behavioral, and social improvement. The program’s components include the Promoting Alternative THinking Strategies curriculum, parent groups, parent–child sharing time, child social skills training, home visiting, child peer-pairing, and academic tutoring. The WWC identified one study of Fast Track that both falls within the scope of the Children Classified as Having an Emotional Disturbance topic area and meets WWC group design standards. This study meets standards without reservations and included 891 students who were identified in kindergarten as being behaviorally disruptive and at high risk for long-term antisocial behavior in 54 schools in four locations. For children classified as having an emotional disturbance (or children at risk for classification), Fast Track was found to have potentially positive effects on emotional/internal behavior, reading achievement/literacy, external behavior, and social outcomes.
10/7/2014
REL 2014039 The Appropriateness of a California Student and Staff Survey for Measuring Middle School Climate
The purpose of this study was to examine the appropriateness of using student and staff self-report surveys—the California School Climate, Health, and Learning Survey (Cal-SCHLS)—to assess school climate in middle schools. The study examined (a) the domains of school climate assessed by the surveys; (b) the reliability of the surveys at both the respondent and school levels; (c) the stability of the survey measures over time; and (d) the relationship of the survey measures to student achievement and discipline. The results suggested that the Cal-SCHLS student survey can be used to validly and reliably assess the following six school-climate domains at the school level: (a) safety and connectedness; (b) caring relationships with adults; (c) meaningful participation; (d) substance use at schools; (e) bullying and discrimination; and (f) delinquency. The Cal-SCHLS teacher survey can also be used to validly and reliably assess six domains: (a) support and safety; (b) caring staff-student relationships; (c) staff peer relationships; (d) student health and engagement; (e) student delinquency; and (f) resource provision. The surveys may help educators identify building-level needs related to school climate, target supports and reforms, and monitor progress in climate improvement efforts.
9/23/2014
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