Skip Navigation

Search Results: (1-14 of 14 records)

 Pub Number  Title  Date
REL 2017174 Benchmarking the state of Kosrae's education management information system
The purpose of this study was to provide information on the current quality of the education management information system (EMIS) in Kosrae, Federated States of Micronesia, so that data specialists, administrators, and policy makers might identify areas for improvement. As part of a focus group interview, knowledgeable data specialists in Kosrae responded to 46 questions covering significant areas of their EMIS. The interview protocol, adapted by Regional Educational Laboratory Pacific from the World Bank's System Assessment and Benchmarking for Education Results assessment tool, provides a means for rating aspects of an EMIS system using four benchmarking levels: latent (the process or action required to improve the aspect of quality is not in place), emerging (the process or action is in progress of implementation), established (the process or action is in place and it meets standards), and mature (the process or action is an example of best practice). Overall, data specialists scored their EMIS as established, or meeting standards. They reported that the prerequisites of quality, that is, both the institutional frameworks that govern the information system and data reporting, and the supporting resources, are established. They rated integrity of education statistics, referring to the professionalism, objectivity, transparency, and ethical standards by which staff operate and statistics are reported, as established. Data specialists reported the accuracy and reliability of education statistics within their system as mature. They reported that the serviceability (the relevance, timeliness, and consistency of data) and accessibility of education data within their system are established. Results show that data specialists know and can apply sound techniques and validate data and generate statistical reports, and that the institutional frameworks and resources meet standards. Data specialists believe that the system could provide better opportunities for user input and that users should be able to request the level of detail they need from data catalogues. The results of this study provide the Kosrae State Department of Education and the National Department of Education with information regarding the strengths and areas of the EMIS that may benefit from improvement efforts through the development of action plans focused on priority areas.
10/18/2016
REL 2017175 Benchmarking the state of Pohnpei's education management information system
The purpose of this study was to provide information on the current quality of the education management information system (EMIS) in Pohnpei, Federated States of Micronesia, so that data specialists, administrators, and policy makers might identify areas for improvement. As part of a focus group interview, knowledgeable data specialists in Pohnpei responded to 46 questions covering significant areas of their EMIS. The interview protocol, adapted by Regional Educational Laboratory Pacific from the World Bank's System Assessment and Benchmarking for Education Results assessment tool, provides a means for rating aspects of an EMIS system using four benchmarking levels: latent (the process or action required to improve the aspect of quality is not in place), emerging (the process or action is in process of implementation), established (the process or action is in place and it meets standards), and mature (the process or action is an example of best practice). Overall, data specialists scored their EMIS as established. They reported that the prerequisites of quality, that is, both the institutional frameworks that govern the information system and data reporting, and the supporting resources, are established. They also rated integrity of education statistics, referring to the professionalism, objectivity, transparency, and ethical standards by which staff operate and statistics are reported, as established. Data specialists reported the accuracy and reliability of education statistics within their system to be established. They reported that the serviceability (the relevance, timeliness, and consistency of data) and accessibility of education data within their system are established. Results show that data specialists know and can apply sound techniques and validate data and generate statistical reports; however the system does not ensure that their roles and responsibilities are defined, nor does it provide any assurance, in the form of a legal mandate, that they receive the data they require. Data specialists provide timely services, but the system cannot assure the public that such services are provided independently, or that public has information regarding internal governmental access to statistics prior to their release. The results of this study provide the Pohnpei State Department of Education and the National Department of Education with information regarding the strengths and areas of the EMIS that may benefit from improvement efforts through the development of action plans focused on priority areas.
10/6/2016
REL 2017176 Benchmarking the state of Chuuk's education management information system
The purpose of this study was to provide information on the current quality of the education management information system (EMIS) in Chuuk, Federated States of Micronesia, so that data specialists, administrators, and policy makers might identify areas for improvement. As part of a focus group interview, knowledgeable data specialists in Chuuk responded to 46 questions covering significant areas of their EMIS. The interview protocol, adapted by Regional Educational Laboratory Pacific from the World Bank’s System Assessment and Benchmarking for Education Results assessment tool, provides a means for rating aspects of an EMIS system using four benchmarking levels: latent (the process or action required to improve the aspect of quality is not in place), emerging (the process or action is in progress of implementation), established (the process or action is in place and it meets standards), and mature (the process or action is an example of best practice). Overall, data specialists scored their EMIS as emerging. They reported that the prerequisites of quality, that is, both the institutional frameworks that govern the information system and data reporting, and the supporting resources, are established. They rated integrity of education statistics, referring to the professionalism, objectivity, transparency, and ethical standards by which staff operate and statistics are reported, as emerging. Data specialists reported the accuracy and reliability of education statistics within their system as established. They reported that the serviceability (the relevance, timeliness, and consistency of data) and accessibility of education data within their system are emerging. Results show that data specialists know and can apply sound techniques and validate data and generate statistical reports, and that the institutional frameworks and resources meet standards. Data specialists indicate that the relevance, timeliness, and consistency of the data and statistics provided to stakeholders could be improved. In addition, the reports that present these data and statistics could be better adapted for the intended audience. The results of this study provide the Chuuk State Department of Education and the National Department of Education with information regarding the strengths and areas of the EMIS that may benefit from improvement efforts through the development of action plans focused on priority areas.
10/6/2016
REL 2016117 Benchmarking Education Management Information Systems Across the Federated States of Micronesia
The purpose of this study was to provide information on the current quality of the education management information system (EMIS) in Yap, Federated States of Micronesia, so that data specialists, administrators, and policy makers might identify areas for improvement. As part of a focus group interview, knowledgeable data specialists in Yap responded to 46 questions covering significant areas of their EMIS. The interview protocol, adapted by Regional Educational Laboratory Pacific from the World Bank’s System Assessment and Benchmarking for Education Results assessment tool, provides a means for rating aspects of an EMIS system using four benchmarking levels: latent (the process or action required to improve the aspect of quality is not in place), emerging (the process or action is in progress of implementation), established (the process or action is in place and it meets standards), and mature (the process or action is an example of best practice). Overall, data specialists scored their EMIS as established. They reported that the prerequisites of quality, that is, both the institutional frameworks that govern the information system and data reporting, and the supporting resources, are emerging. They also rated integrity of education statistics, referring to the professionalism, objectivity, transparency, and ethical standards by which staff operate and statistics are reported, as emerging. Data specialists reported the accuracy and reliability of education statistics within their system to be mature. They reported that the serviceability (the relevance, timeliness, and consistency of data) and accessibility of education data within their system are established. Results show that data specialists know and can apply sound techniques and validate data and generate statistical reports; however the system does not ensure that their roles and responsibilities are defined, nor does it provide any assurance, in the form of a legal mandate, that they receive the data they require. Data specialists provide timely services, but the system cannot assure the public that such services are provided independently, or that public has information regarding internal governmental access to statistics prior to their release. The results of this study provide the Yap State Department of Education and the National Department of Education with information regarding the strengths and areas of the EMIS that may benefit from improvement efforts through the development of action plans focused on priority areas
2/19/2016
REL 2016111 Measuring school leaders' effectiveness: Findings from a multiyear pilot of Pennsylvania's Framework for Leadership
This "Stated Briefly" report is a companion piece that summarizes the results of another report of the same name. This study examines the accuracy of performance ratings from the Framework for Leadership (FFL), Pennsylvania's tool for evaluating the leadership practices of principals and assistant principals. The study analyzed four key properties of the FFL: score variation, internal consistency, year-to-year stability, and concurrent validity. Score variation was characterized by the percentages of school leaders earning scores in different portions of the rating scale. To measure the internal consistency of the FFL, Cronbach's alpha was calculated for the full FFL and for each of its four categories of leadership practices. Analyses of score stability used data on FFL scores of school years across two years to calculate Pearson’s correlation coefficient. Concurrent validity was assessed through a regression model for the relationship between school leaders' estimated contributions to student achievement growth and their FFL scores. This report is based primarily on the 2013/14 pilot in which 517 principals and 123 assistant principals were rated by their supervisors; an interim report examined data from the 2012/13 pilot year. The study finds that the FFL is a reliable measure, with good internal consistency and a moderate level of year-to-year stability in scores. The study also finds evidence of the FFL’s concurrent validity: principals with higher scores on the FFL, on average, make larger estimated contributions to student achievement growth. Higher total FFL scores and scores in two of the four FFL domains are significantly or marginally significantly associated with both value-added in all subjects combined and value-added in math specifically. This evidence of the validity of the FFL sets it apart from other principal evaluation tools: No other measures of principals' professional practice have been shown to be related to principals' effects on student achievement. However, in both pilot years, variation in scores was limited, with most school leaders scoring in the upper third of the rating scale. As the FFL is implemented statewide, continued examination of evidence on its statistical properties, especially the variation in scores, is important.
1/21/2016
REL 2016106 Measuring school leaders' effectiveness: Final report from a multiyear pilot of Pennsylvania's Framework for Leadership
This study examines the accuracy of performance ratings from the Framework for Leadership (FFL), Pennsylvania's tool for evaluating the leadership practices of principals and assistant principals. The study analyzed four key properties of the FFL: score variation, internal consistency, year-to-year stability, and concurrent validity. Score variation was characterized by the percentages of school leaders earning scores in different portions of the rating scale. To measure the internal consistency of the FFL, Cronbach's alpha was calculated for the full FFL and for each of its four categories of leadership practices. Analyses of score stability used data on FFL scores of school years across two years to calculate Pearson’s correlation coefficient. Concurrent validity was assessed through a regression model for the relationship between school leaders' estimated contributions to student achievement growth and their FFL scores. This report is based primarily on the 2013/14 pilot in which 517 principals and 123 assistant principals were rated by their supervisors; an interim report examined data from the 2012/13 pilot year. The study finds that the FFL is a reliable measure, with good internal consistency and a moderate level of year-to-year stability in scores. The study also finds evidence of the FFL's concurrent validity: principals with higher scores on the FFL, on average, make larger estimated contributions to student achievement growth. Higher total FFL scores and scores in two of the four FFL domains are significantly or marginally significantly associated with both value-added in all subjects combined and value-added in math specifically. This evidence of the validity of the FFL sets it apart from other principal evaluation tools: No other measures of principals' professional practice have been shown to be related to principals' effects on student achievement. However, in both pilot years, variation in scores was limited, with most school leaders scoring in the upper third of the rating scale. As the FFL is implemented statewide, continued examination of evidence on its statistical properties, especially the variation in scores, is important.
1/21/2016
WWC QRPSM0310 Quick Review of the Article "Impact of For-Profit and Nonprofit Management on Student Achievement: The Philadelphia Intervention, 2002-2008"
The study examined whether shifting public schools to private management improved the academic achievement of eighth graders.

The study analyzed data on eighth graders in 88 schools in the Philadelphia City School District from 1996–97 to 2005–06.

Academic achievement in reading and mathematics was measured using the schools' mean eighth-grade scale scores on the Pennsylvania System of School Assessment exam.

The study measured the effect of changing to private management by comparing annual test score gains for schools before and after being shifted to private management to the gains over the same period for schools that remained under district control.
3/2/2010
WWC IRDPTD09 Talent Development Middle Grades Program
TDMG is a whole school reform approach for large middle schools that face serious problems with student attendance, discipline, and academic achievement. The program includes both structural and curriculum reforms. It calls for schools to reorganize into small "learning communities" of 200 to 300 students who attend classes in distinct areas of the school and stay together throughout their time in middle school. In addition to structural changes, schools adopting the program purchase one or more curricula that are intended to be developmentally appropriate and to engage students with culturally relevant content. For students who are behind in reading and math, the program provides additional periods devoted to these subjects that include group activities and computer-based lessons. To improve implementation, each school is assigned a team of "curriculum coaches" trained by the developer to work with school staff on a weekly basis to implement the program. In addition, teachers are offered professional development training, including monthly sessions designed to familiarize them with the program and demonstrate effective instructional approaches.
3/3/2009
REL 2007009 How Northwest Region States Are Responding To Schools In Need of Improvement
This descriptive study examines the systems of technical assistance and support that Northwest Region states implemented during 2005/06 for schools in need of improvement. By illuminating key characteristics and differences among state systems, the intent is to stimulate a thoughtful analysis of what states can do and what issues they might address to move schools out of in need of improvement status.
8/13/2008
WWC 20084020 Turning Around Chronically Low-Performing Schools
This guide identifies practices that can improve the performance of chronically low-performing schools-a process commonly referred to as creating "turnaround schools." The four recommendations in this guide work together to help failing schools make adequate yearly progress.
5/6/2008
NCES 2003412 Planning Guide for Maintaining School Facilities Brochure
This brochure is designed to promote the Planning Guide for Maintaining School Facilities guide book (NCES 2003347).
3/18/2003
NCES 2003347 Planning Guide for Maintaining School Facilities
This Guide was prepared by members of the National Forum on Education Statistics to help school facilities managers plan for efficient and effective operations. It provides practical advice on a range of topics, including how to do a facilities audit to know what you have, planning for maintenance that will ensure smooth operations and avoid costly surprises, managing staff and contractors, and evaluating maintenance efforts.
2/4/2003
NCES 2002025 The Condition of Education 2002
The Condition of Education summarizes important developments and trends in education using the latest available data. The report, which is required by law, is an indicator report intended for a general audience of readers who are interested in education. The indicators represent a consensus of professional judgment on the most significant national measures of the condition and progress of education for which accurate data are available. The 2002 print edition includes 44 indicators in six main areas: (1) enrollment trends and student characteristics at all levels of the education system from preprimary education to adult learning; (2) student achievement and the longer term, enduring effects of education; (3) student effort and rates of progress through the educational system among different population groups; (4) the quality of elementary and secondary education in terms of courses taken, teacher characteristics, and other factors; (5) the context of postsecondary education; (6) and societal support for learning, including parental and community support for learning, and public and private financial support of education at all levels. This edition also includes special analyses on the environment, climate, and student outcomes at private schools and on the enrollment and persistence of nontraditional undergraduates.
5/31/2002
NCES 97908 How Widespread is Site-Based Decisionmaking in the Public Schools? (Issue Brief)
The push towards decentralization raises questions about the composition and areas of responsibility of site-based decisionmaking bodies. What percentages of these groups include teachers? parents? What school policy areas do site-based decisionmaking bodies consider? Data available from the 1993-94 Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS), conducted by the National Center
1/15/1997
   1 - 14