Skip Navigation

Search Results: (16-30 of 40 records)

 Pub Number  Title  Date
NCES 2010349 Characteristics of the 100 Largest Public Elementary and Secondary School Districts in the United States: 2007-08
This annual report provides basic information from the Common Core of Data about the nation's largest public school districts in the 2007-08 school year. The data include such characteristics as the number of students and teachers, number of high school completers and the averaged freshman graduation rate, and revenues and expenditures. Findings include: In 2007-08, these 100 largest districts enrolled 22 percent of all public school students, and employed 21 percent of all public school teachers. The districts produced 20 percent of all high school completers (both diploma and other completion credential recipients) in 2006-07. Three states -- California, Florida, and Texas -- accounted for almost half of the 100 largest public school districts. Current per-pupil expenditures in fiscal year 2007 ranged from a low of $5,886 in the Alpine District, Utah to a high of $21,801 in Boston, Massachusetts.
7/27/2010
NCES 2010013 Digest of Education Statistics, 2009
The 45th in a series of publications initiated in 1962, the Digest's primary purpose is to provide a compilation of statistical information covering the broad field of American education from prekindergarten through graduate school. The Digest contains data on a variety of topics, including the number of schools and colleges, teachers, enrollments, and graduates, in addition to educational attainment, finances, and federal funds for education, libraries, and international comparisons.
4/7/2010
NCES 2009342 Characteristics of the 100 Largest Public Elementary and Secondary School Districts in the United States: 2006-07
This annual report provides basic information from the Common Core of Data about the nation's largest public school districts in the 2006-07 school year. The data include such characteristics as the number of students and teachers, number of high school completers and the averaged freshman graduation rate, and revenues and expenditures. Findings include: In 2006-07, these 100 largest districts enrolled 23 percent of all public school students, and employed 22 percent of all public school teachers. The districts produced 17 percent of all high school completers (both diploma and other completion credential recipients) in 2005-06. Across the districts, the average freshman graduation rate was 75.6 percent. Three states -- California, Florida, and Texas -- accounted for almost half of the 100 largest public school districts. Current per-pupil expenditures in fiscal year 2003 ranged from a low of $5,719 in the Puerto Rico School District to a high of $19,749 in Boston, Massachusetts.
6/9/2009
NCES 2009020 Digest of Education Statistics, 2008
The 44th in a series of publications initiated in 1962, the Digest's primary purpose is to provide a compilation of statistical information covering the broad field of American education from prekindergarten through graduate school. The Digest contains data on a variety of topics, including the number of schools and colleges, teachers, enrollments, and graduates, in addition to educational attainment, finances, and federal funds for education, libraries, and international comparisons.
3/18/2009
NCES 2008339 Characteristics of the 100 Largest Public Elementary and Secondary School Districts in the United States: 2005-06
This annual report provides basic information from the Common Core of Data about the nation's largest public school districts in the 2005-06 school year. The data include such characteristics as the numbers of students and teachers, number of high school completers and the averaged freshman graduation rate, and revenues and expenditures. Findings include: In 2005-06, these 100 largest districts enrolled 23 percent of all public school students, and employed 22 percent of all public school teachers. The districts produced 20 percent of all high school completers (both diploma and other completion credential recipients) in 2004-05. Across the districts, the averaged freshman graduation rate was 69.5 percent. Three states -- California, Florida, and Texas -- accounted for almost half of the 100 largest public school districts. Current per-pupil expenditures in fiscal year 2003 ranged from a low of $5,104 in the Puerto Rico School District to a high of $18,878 in the District of Columbia Public School District.
6/26/2008
NCES 2008335 Characteristics of the 100 Largest Public Elementary and Secondary School Districts in the United States: 2004-05
This annual report provides basic information from the Common Core of Data about the nationís largest public school districts in the 2004-05 school year. The data include such characteristics as the numbers of students and teachers, number of high school completers and the averaged freshman graduation rate, and revenues and expenditures. Several findings were: These 100 largest districts enrolled 23 percent of all public school students, and employed 20 percent of all public school teachers, in 2004-05. The 100 largest districts produced 20 percent of all high school completers (both diploma and other completion credential recipients) in 2003-04. Across these districts, the averaged freshman graduation rate was 70.2 percent. Four states -- California, Florida, Texas, and New York -- accounted for more than half of the 100 largest public school districts. Current per-pupil expenditures in fiscal year 2003 ranged from a low of $4,351 in the Puerto Rico School District to a high of $17,337 in Boston, Massachusetts.
4/1/2008
NCES 2008022 Digest of Education Statistics, 2007
The 43rd in a series of publications initiated in 1962, the Digestís primary purpose is to provide a compilation of statistical information covering the broad field of American education from prekindergarten through graduate school. The Digest contains data on a variety of topics, including the number of schools and colleges, teachers, enrollments, and graduates, in addition to educational attainment, finances, and federal funds for education, libraries, and international comparisons.
3/25/2008
NCES 2007017 Digest of Education Statistics, 2006
The 42nd in a series of publications initiated in 1962, the Digestís primary purpose is to provide a compilation of statistical information covering the broad field of American education from prekindergarten through graduate school. The Digest contains data on a variety of topics, including the number of schools and colleges, teachers, enrollments, and graduates, in addition to educational attainment, finances, and federal funds for education, libraries, and international comparisons.
7/26/2007
NCES 2006329 Characteristics of the 100 Largest Public Elementary and Secondary School Districts in the United States: 2003-04
This annual report provides basic information from the Common Core of Data about the nationís largest public school districts in the 2003-04 school year. The data include such characteristics as the numbers of students and teachers, number of high school completers and the averaged freshman graduation rate, and revenues and expenditures. Several findings were: These 100 largest districts enrolled 23 percent of all public school students, and employed 22 percent of all public school teachers, in 2003-04. The 100 largest districts produced 20 percent of all high school completers (both diploma and other completion credential recipients) in 2002-03. Across these districts, the averaged freshman graduation rate was 68.8 percent. In 19 of the 100 largest districts the rate was 80 percent or higher. The rate was less than 50 percent in 8 of the 100 largest districts. Three states Ė California, Florida, and Texas Ė accounted for 41 of the 100 largest public school districts. Current per-pupil expenditures in fiscal year 2003 ranged from a low of $4,413 in Alpine School District, Utah to a high of $17,652 in Newark City, New Jersey.
9/26/2006
NCES 2006030 Digest of Education Statistics, 2005
The 41st in a series of publications initiated in 1962, the Digestís primary purpose is to provide a compilation of statistical information covering the broad field of American education from prekindergarten through graduate school. The Digest contains data on a variety of topics, including the number of schools and colleges, teachers, enrollments, and graduates, in addition to educational attainment, finances, and federal funds for education, libraries, and international comparisons. Some examples of highlights from the report include the following items. Enrollment in public elementary and secondary schools rose 22 percent between 1985 and 2005. The fastest public school growth occurred in the elementary grades (prekindergarten through grade 8), where enrollment rose 24 percent over this period, from 27.0 million to 33.5 million. Public secondary school enrollment declined 8 percent from 1985 to 1990, but then rose 31 percent from 1990 to 2005, for a net increase of 20 percent. The number of public school teachers has risen faster than the number of students over the past 10 years, resulting in declines in the pupil/teacher ratio. Between 1994 and 2004, the number of full-time college students increased by 30 percent compared to an 8 percent increase in part-time students. During the same time period, the number of men enrolled rose 16 percent, while the number of women enrolled increased by 25 percent.
8/10/2006
NCES 2006005 Digest of Education Statistics, 2004
The Digest of Education Statistics provides a compilation of statistical information covering the broad field of education from prekindergarten through graduate school. Topics in the Digest include: the number of schools and colleges; teachers; enrollments; graduates; educational attainment; finances; federal funds for education; employment and income of graduates; libraries; technology; and international comparisons.
10/12/2005
NCES 2005312 Characteristics of the 100 Largest Public Elementary and Secondary School Districts in the United States: 2002-03
This report presents information drawn from the Common Core of Data (CCD) Local Education Agency Universe survey about the 1 percent of the Nationís school districts that serve 23 percent of all public school students. It includes information about the numbers of dropouts and high school completers, student participation in selected programs, the numbers of teachers, and revenues and expenditures in these districts. Although the 100 largest school districts are large by definition, they differ in many characteristics. The size ranges from more than 1 million students in New York Public Schools to about 46 thousand in Cherry Creek, Colorado. Current expenditures ranged from $3,563 per pupil in Puerto Rico to $14,012 in Boston.
8/12/2005
NCES 2005025 Digest of Education Statistics, 2003
The Digest of Education Statistics provides a compilation of statistical information covering the broad field of education from prekindergarten through graduate school. Topics in the Digest include: the number of schools and colleges; teachers; enrollments; graduates; educational attainment; finances; federal funds for education; employment and income of graduates; libraries; technology; and international comparisons.
12/30/2004
NCES 2003353 Characteristics of the 100 Largest Public Elementary and Secondary School Districts in the United States: 2001-02
This publication provides descriptive information about the 100 largest school districts in the United States. Almost one in every four public school students in this nation is served by one of these large districts. They are distinguished from the average district by characteristics, in addition to sheer size, such as pupil-teacher ratios, high school graduates, and minority enrollment as a proportion of total enrollment.
10/3/2003
NCES 2002351 Characteristics of the 100 Largest Public Elementary and Secondary School Districts in the United States: 2000-01
This publication provides descriptive information about the 100 largest school districts in the United States. Almost one in every four public school students in this nation is served by one of these large districts. They are distinguished from the average district by characteristics, in addition to sheer size, such as pupil-teacher ratios, high school graduates, and minority enrollment as a proportion of total enrollment.
8/20/2002
<< Prev    16 - 30     Next >>
Page 2  of  3