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 Pub Number  Title  Date
NCES 2019241 Baccalaureate and Beyond (B&B:16/17): A First Look at the Employment and Educational Experiences of College Graduates, 1 Year Later
This report describes outcomes of 2015–16 bachelor’s degree recipients 1 year after graduation. Outcomes include time to degree, amount borrowed for undergraduate education, postbaccalaureate enrollment, employment status, earnings and job characteristics, and steps taken toward a career in teaching. These findings are based on data from the first follow-up of the Baccalaureate and Beyond Longitudinal Study (B&B:16/17), a nationally representative longitudinal sample survey of students who completed the requirements for a bachelor's degree during the 2015–16 academic year.
7/10/2019
NCES 2019467 Profile of Undergraduate Students: Attendance, Distance and Remedial Education, Degree Program and Field of Study, Demographics, Financial Aid, Financial Literacy, Employment, and Military Status: 2015–16
These Web Tables provide comprehensive information on undergraduate students who were enrolled in postsecondary institutions during the 2015–16 academic year. Using data from the 2015–16 National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS:16), these tables include topics on attendance, average grades, credit card debt, participation in distance and remedial education, degree program, field of study, financial aid, financial literacy, military service and veteran status, and student characteristics (including sex, race/ethnicity, age, dependency status, disability status, income, marital status, and parents’ education).
1/23/2019
NCES 2019469 Profile and Financial Aid Estimates of Graduate Students: 2015–16
These Web Tables provide a profile of the demographic and enrollment characteristics of graduate students during the 2015–16 academic year and information on how these students financed their education. Using data from the 2015–16 National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS:16), the tables include information on graduate students’ distribution across degree programs and fields of study; demographic, family, and employment characteristics; educational expenses; and financial aid by source and type.
1/3/2019
NCES 2018118 Paths Through Mathematics and Science: Patterns and Relationships in High School Coursetaking
This report examines mathematics and science coursetaking in high school by providing a description of coursetaking within each of the mathematics and science subject areas in ninth, tenth, eleventh and twelfth grades, as well as by showing the association between early mathematics coursetaking and subsequent science coursetaking.

The report also describes coursetaking in engineering and technology, and the associations between coursetaking in these subject areas and in mathematics and science. The results are based on 2009 high school transcripts that are linked to 2009 NAEP mathematics and science 12th grade assessments.
6/19/2018
NCES 2018423 Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Graduates: Where Are They 4 Years After Receiving a Bachelor’s Degree?
These Web Tables present data on the transition of 2007‒08 science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) bachelor’s degree recipients into the labor market and further education during the 4 years after college graduation. These tables are of interest to federal and state policymakers because they provide information about the supply of bachelor’s-level STEM workers in the United States. The estimates were generated from the second follow-up of the 2007–08 Baccalaureate and Beyond Longitudinal Study (B&B:08/12).
12/20/2017
REL 2018279 Associations between predictive indicators and postsecondary science, technology, engineering, and math success among Hispanic students in Texas
This study sought to identify factors that predict positive STEM-related postsecondary outcomes for students in Texas, and to determine whether the association between predictive factors and outcomes differs between Hispanic and non-Hispanic White students. The research team linked K–12 student academic data to college enrollment data for Texas public high school students who enrolled in colleges and universities in Texas during a period from the 2004/05 to the 2010/11 school years (seven cohorts). Regression models examined relationships between possible indicators (e.g., number and level of math or science classes completed) with the outcomes of interest (declaring a STEM major, persisting in a STEM major, and completing a STEM degree), while controlling for nonmalleable student and school factors as well as for cohort fixed effects. Interaction terms added to the models provided a separate estimate, for Hispanic, Black, non-Hispanic White, and Other ethnicity students, of the association of each indicator with each postsecondary outcome. Measures of academic experiences and performance in math and science during high school were strongly associated with postsecondary STEM outcomes. These associations were generally consistent for Hispanic and non-Hispanic White students. Statistically significant indicators of positive postsecondary STEM outcomes included number of math and science courses completed, number of Advanced Placement courses taken, highest-level math or science course taken, and state assessment scores. This study demonstrates that Hispanic students reap the same benefits of taking higher-level math and science courses in high school as do non-Hispanic White students. Future studies should consider possible factors influencing the academic experiences of Hispanic students in high school science and math, such as access to rigorous courses.
11/21/2017
REL 2016170 Stated Briefly: Exploring the foundations of the future STEM workforce: K-12 indicators of postsecondary STEM success
This "Stated Briefly" report is a companion piece that summarizes the results of another report of the same name. The purpose of this study was to review recent peer-reviewed studies in order to identify malleable factors measured in K-12 settings that are related to students' postsecondary STEM success, particularly for Hispanic students. Postsecondary STEM success was defined as enrollment in, persistence in, and completion of postsecondary STEM majors or degrees. Twenty-three relevant studies were identified, yet only 4 examined K-12 factors predictive of postsecondary STEM success specifically for Hispanic students. The review found that the number of high school mathematics and science courses taken, and the level of those courses is a consistent predictor of postsecondary STEM outcomes for all student subgroups. However, the literature indicates that minority students, including Hispanics, were less likely to take the highest-level mathematics and science courses. Students' interest and confidence in STEM at the K-12 levels was also predictive of postsecondary STEM success. Yet, despite lower levels of postsecondary STEM success, some studies indicate racial/ethnic minority and White students had similar levels of interest and confidence in STEM. The reviewed research suggests that reducing disparities in mathematics and science preparation between Hispanic and White students and increasing the rates at which Hispanic students take high-level mathematics and science classes has promise for informing interventions designed to improve STEM outcomes.
7/28/2016
NCES 2016164 Student Self-Assessment of Math and Science Ability in High School
This Data Point uses data from the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009, collected in 2009 when students were high school freshmen, and in 2012, when most students were in their junior year of high school. The study has an overarching STEM focus, and included student self-assessment of confidence in math and science and information indicating their self and others’ assessment of their math abilities. At two points in high school, students were asked about their confidence in their ability to do math and science coursework, and about their perceptions of themselves as a “math person” or a “science person.” Results are presented by sex.
7/14/2016
REL 2016122 A Review of the Literature to Identify Leading Indicators Related to Hispanic STEM Postsecondary Educational Outcomes
The purpose of this study was to review recent peer-reviewed studies in order to identify malleable factors measured in K–12 settings that are related to students' postsecondary STEM success, particularly for Hispanic students. Postsecondary STEM success was defined as enrollment in, persistence in, and completion of postsecondary STEM majors or degrees. Twenty-three relevant studies were identified, yet only 4 examined K–12 factors predictive of postsecondary STEM success specifically for Hispanic students. The review found that the number of high school mathematics and science courses taken, and the level of those courses is a consistent predictor of postsecondary STEM outcomes for all student subgroups. However, the literature indicates that minority students, including Hispanics, were less likely to take the highest-level mathematics and science courses. Students' interest and confidence in STEM at the K–12 levels was also predictive of postsecondary STEM success. Yet, despite lower levels of postsecondary STEM success, some studies indicate racial/ethnic minority and White students had similar levels of interest and confidence in STEM. The reviewed research suggests that reducing disparities in mathematics and science preparation between Hispanic and White students and increasing the rates at which Hispanic students take high-level mathematics and science classes has promise for informing interventions designed to improve STEM outcomes.
4/19/2016
NCES 2015315 High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09) 2013 Update and High School Transcripts Public-use Data File
These public-use files include data from the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09) collected in the Base Year (2009), First Follow-up (2012), 2013 Update and High School Transcripts (2014).
7/1/2015
NCES 2015038 High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09) 2013 Update and High School Transcripts Restricted-use Data File
These restricted-use files for the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09) include data collected in the Base Year (2009), First Follow-up (2012), 2013 Update and High School Transcripts (2014). This release includes both composite variables as well as variables from questionnaires and high school transcripts that were suppressed on the public-use version of the data files.
7/1/2015
NCES 2015037REV High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09) 2013 Update and High School Transcript Study: A First Look at Fall 2009 Ninth-Graders in 2013
This report provides a first look at selected findings from 1) the 2013 Update and 2) the High School Transcript Study of the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09). HSLS:09 is a nationally representative study of a cohort of students who were ninth-graders in fall 2009. The study focuses on understanding students’ trajectories from the beginning of high school into higher education and the workforce. The core research questions for the study explore secondary to postsecondary transition plans and the evolution of those plans; the paths into and out of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields of study and careers; and the educational and social experiences related to these shifts in plans or paths.
6/25/2015
NCES 2015075 Gender Differences in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Interest, Credits Earned, and NAEP Performance in the 12th Grade
This Statistics in Brief describes high school graduates’ attitudes toward STEM courses (specifically, mathematics and science), credits earned in STEM fields, and performance on the NAEP mathematics and science assessments in 2009.
2/12/2015
NCES 2015027 Baccalaureate Degree Recipients’ Early Labor Market and Education Outcomes: 1994, 2001, and 2009
These Web Tables compare the education and labor force outcomes of 1992–93, 1999–2000, and 2007–08 baccalaureate degree recipients 1 year after graduation by their undergraduate major field of study, including science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields. The data are drawn from three iterations of the Baccalaureate and Beyond Longitudinal Study (B&B:93/94, 2000/01, and 08/09). The outcomes presented in these tables include further education enrollment following the bachelor’s degree, employment status, and occupational field. The tables also present information on the 1-year education and labor force outcomes of 2007–08 bachelor’s degree recipients by the credits they earned in selected fields as undergraduates. Information on undergraduate credits was drawn from transcripts collected from the institutions that granted the graduates’ bachelor’s degrees.
11/14/2014
NCES 2015167 Profile of Undergraduate Students: 2011-12 (Web Tables)
These Web Tables are a comprehensive source of information on undergraduate students attending postsecondary institutions in the United States during the 2011–12 academic year. Data presented in these tables are from the 2011–12 National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS:12). Topics include enrollment and attendance status, degree program, major field of study, average grades, student characteristics (including sex, race/ethnicity, age, dependency status, income, marital status, responsibility for dependents, high school completion status, local residence while enrolled, citizenship status, and parents’ education), financial aid status and credit card debt, work, disability status, and participation in distance and remedial education.
10/2/2014
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