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 Pub Number  Title  Date
NCES 2018086 English Language Program Participation Among Students in the Kindergarten Class of 2010–11: Spring 2011 to Spring 2012
This Statistics in Brief examines differences in the student and school characteristics of kindergartners who participated in instructional programs designed to teach English language skills and students who did not participate in such programs in the kindergarten class of 2010–11. The brief then examines the characteristics of the English language program (e.g., English as a second language, bilingual education, and dual-language education) that participating students were receiving in spring 2011 and changes in participation in these programs between spring 2011 and spring 2012. Data come from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 2010–11 (ECLS-K:2011), a longitudinal study that was designed to follow the same children from kindergarten through fifth grade.
7/17/2018
NCES 2016151 Public-Use Data Files and Documentation (FRSS 107): Programs and Services for High School English Learners
This file contains data from a fast-response survey titled "Programs and Services for High School English Learners." This survey provides the first nationally representative data on programs and services for high school English learners (ELs). NCES released the results of this survey in the First Look report “Programs and Services for High School English Learners in Public School Districts: 2015 –16” (NCES 2016-150).

Questionnaires and cover letters were mailed to the superintendent of each sampled district in September 2015. The letter stated the purpose of the study and requested that the questionnaire be completed by the person(s) in the district most knowledgeable about programs and services for English learners at the high school level. Respondents were asked to respond for the current 2015–16 school year. Respondents were offered options of completing the survey on paper or online. Telephone follow-up for survey nonresponse and data clarification was initiated in October 2015 and completed in February 2016. The weighted response rate was 89 percent.

Respondents reported about programs and services for high school ELs, including instructional approaches, newcomer programs, online or computer-based programs, and programs or services (e.g., tutoring) designed specifically for high school ELs.
12/29/2016
NCES 2016150 Programs and Services for High School English Learners in Public School Districts: 2015–16
The 2015–16 survey Programs and Services for High School English Learners provides the first nationally representative data on this topic. This report is based on that survey and presents data on programs and services for high school English learners (ELs), including instructional approaches, newcomer programs, online or computer-based programs, and programs or services (e.g., tutoring) designed specifically for high school ELs. The report provides findings on the use of native language(s) for content instruction, instructional support, materials, and services. Data are presented about the information that districts provide about educational programs or services to ELs ages 18 to 21 seeking to newly enroll in the district, as well as the factors districts consider when providing information about these programs and services to ELs in this group.
10/11/2016
REL 2016149 Using computer-adaptive assessments of literacy to monitor the progress of English learner students
The purpose of this study was to examine (a) how teachers and school staff individually administer computer-adaptive assessments of literacy to English learner students in grades 3–5, and (b) how they use the assessments to monitor students' growth. Because adaptive assessments maximize precision of information while minimizing time spent gaining it, they are particularly valuable for students whose performance is outside typical grade-level norms such as English learner students. Three elementary schools with high proportions of English learner students participated in the study. Participating students were at the two lowest levels on the state oral language proficiency measure. At the beginning of the year there were 117 participating students and by the end of the year 102 remained at the same school. To address the first question, Regional Educational Laboratory (REL) Southeast staff observed the September training and the fall, winter, and spring administration of the Florida Center for Reading Research Reading Assessment (FRA). To address the second question, teachers and school staff individually administered the FRA to participating students in the fall, winter, and spring. They discussed their observations of students' performance during test administration and students' score reports with REL staff after each assessment period. Findings indicated that teachers in grades 3–5 can be trained to individually administer computer-adaptive assessments of literacy to their English learner students three times a year and to participate in data chats after each assessment period to discuss translation of scores to instruction. The report provides recommendations that may aid districts in implementing such adaptive assessments of literacy to monitor the progress of English learner students.
6/28/2016
REL 2016158 Getting It Right: Reference Guides for Registering Students With Non-English Names
Getting a student’s name right is the first step in welcoming him or her to school. Incorrectly entering student names can mean that the same student is listed in different databases in various ways and often with incomplete records. Consequently, students who are eligible for services (for example, English learner support) can be unidentified or overlooked. This set of naming conventions guides can serve as a reference for accurately and consistently entering students’ names in school, district, and state databases as well as address and greet parents and other family members in a culturally responsive and respectful way. The guides are available for students with home languages of Arabic, Chinese, Hindi, Korean, Russian, Somali, Spanish, Tagalog, Ukrainian, Urdu, and Vietnamese.
6/14/2016
REL 2016128 English Learner Student Characteristics and Time to Reclassification: An Example From Washington State
This study examined how long it typically takes English learner students to become proficient in English and how this time differs by student characteristics, such as gender, home language, or initial proficiency in English. The authors analyzed state data for 16,957 English learner students who entered kindergarten between 2005/06 and 2011/12 in seven cohorts. The students attended seven school districts that comprise the Road Map Project, an initiative designed to double the number of students in South King County (Washington) who are on track to graduate from college or earn a career credential by 2020. The study looked at five language groups in the region, each of which comprises at least 3 percent of the total sample: Spanish, Vietnamese, Somali, Russian and Ukrainian combined, and Cantonese and Mandarin Chinese combined. All other languages, 160 in total, were combined into an "other language" category. The findings show that students who entered kindergarten as English learners took a median of 3.8 years to be reclassified by Washington state as former English learners. Those who entered kindergarten with advanced English language proficiency were more likely to be reclassified than English learner students with basic or intermediate English proficiency. Also, female English learner students were more likely to be reclassified than male English learner students. Speakers of Chinese, Vietnamese, and Russian and Ukrainian were more likely to be reclassified than Somali or Spanish speakers. In addition to contributing to the research base, the study findings may be of interest to state education agencies as they create new targets and standards for English language proficiency. State agencies may wish to consider taking initial English language proficiency into account when determining appropriate targets for federal accountability measures, for example by setting longer expected times to reclassification and providing additional support to students entering school with basic or intermediate levels of English language proficiency. Many states are also implementing new standards for college and career readiness and overhauling their assessment and accountability systems, both of which involve setting additional targets for English learner students. A better understanding of the factors related to variation in time to proficiency may allow states to establish targets that take particular factors, such as initial English language proficiency, into account.
3/23/2016
REL 2015094 Suspension, Expulsion, and Achievement of English Learner Students in Six Oregon Districts
States and districts are increasingly concerned about how exclusionary discipline (i.e., suspensions and expulsions) and lost instructional time impacts student outcomes. Also, there is concern about whether there are disparities in exclusionary discipline rates between students from different subgroups and their peers. This study examines data from six Oregon school districts to discern patterns of exclusionary discipline and the association of exclusionary discipline with achievement on state assessments in reading and mathematics for English language learner (ELL) students, who are a large, growing, and challenging population in Oregon schools. The districts will use the results to develop specific plans for making their disciplinary practices both fair and effective.
8/4/2015
REL 2012108 A Descriptive Analysis of Enrollment and Achievement Among English Language Learner Students in New Jersey
This report describes enrollment and achievement trends of LEP students in New Jersey public schools between 2002/03 and 2008/09. It documents achievement gaps between LEP and general education students in language arts literacy and math, as measured by statewide assessments administered in grades 3, 4, 8, and 11. The study's main findings include:

  • LEP students in New Jersey spoke 187 languages in 2008/09, up from 151 in 2002/03. In 2008/09, Spanish (spoken by 66.8 percent of LEP students in the state) had the most speakers, followed by Arabic (2.6 percent), Korean (2.5 percent), and Portuguese (2.0 percent).
  • The achievement of LEP students increased in both language arts literacy and mathematics in elementary, middle, and high school. As a result, the achievement gap between LEP students and general education students in grades 3 and 4 narrowed in both language arts literacy and math, and the achievement gap in grades 8 and 11 narrowed in language arts literacy but widened in math.
4/24/2012
REL 2012127 A Descriptive Analysis of Enrollment and Achievement Among English Language Learner Students in Pennsylvania
The number of English language learner (ELL) students in Pennsylvania public schools rose 24.7 percent from 2002/03 to 2008/09, whereas total student enrollment fell 2.4 percent. During that period, ELL student enrollment increased from 2.1 percent of the student population in 2002/03 to 2.7 percent in 2008/09. These figures are of concern to educators because of the large achievement gaps between ELL and non-ELL students and the need to meet the No Child Left Behind Act goal of bringing all students to proficiency by 2014.

This report describes enrollment and achievement trends of ELL students in Pennsylvania public schools between 2002/03 and 2008/09. It documents achievement gaps between ELL and general education students in reading, math, and writing, as measured by statewide assessments administered in grades 3–8 and 11. The study's main findings include:

  • ELL students in Pennsylvania spoke 211 languages in 2008/09, up from 138 in 2002/03. In 2008/09, Spanish (spoken by 57.6 percent of ELL students in the state) had the most speakers, followed by English dialects (7.0 percent), Chinese (3.6 percent), Vietnamese (3.2 percent), Arabic (2.6 percent), and Russian (2.3 percent). ELL students speaking "other" languages (languages other than the 18 most common in the state) accounted for 12.2 percent of the ELL student population in 2008/09.
  • During the period studied, the overall achievement gap in reading, math, and writing between ELL and non-ELL students increased in all grades studied except for grade 3, where the achievement gap narrowed in reading and math.
  • The achievement gap between ELL and non-ELL students was 21–55 percentage points in reading, math, and writing every year during the period studied.
4/24/2012
REL 2012128 A Descriptive Analysis of Enrollment and Achievement Among English Language Learner Students in Maryland
The number of limited English proficient (LEP) students in Maryland public schools rose 73 percent from 2002/03 to 2008/09, whereas total student enrollment rose only 2.1 percent. During that period, LEP student enrollment increased from 3.0 percent of total student enrollment in 2002/03 to 5.2 percent in 2008/09. These figures are of concern to educators because of the large achievement gaps between LEP and non-LEP students nationally and the need to meet the No Child Left Behind Act goal of bringing all students to proficiency by 2014.

This report, describes enrollment and achievement trends of LEP students in Maryland public schools between 2002/03 and 2008/09. It documents large achievement gaps, ranging from 11 to 49 percentage points, between LEP and non-LEP students in reading and math, as measured by statewide assessments administered in grades 3–8 and 10. The study's main findings include:

  • From 2002/03 to 2008/09, Spanish speakers accounted for the largest percentage of LEP students, peaking at 59.9 percent in 2004/05. In 2008/09, Spanish (spoken by 56.8 percent of LEP students) had the most speakers, followed by French (3.3 percent), Chinese (3.2 percent), Vietnamese (2.3 percent), and Korean (2.2 percent). LEP students speaking "other" languages (languages other than the five most common in the state) accounted for 32.1 percent of LEP students in 2008/09.
  • Between 2002/03 and 2008/09, LEP students accounted for a larger percentage of enrollment in elementary school (grades K–5) than in middle school (grades 6–8) or in high school (grades 9–12). In 2008/09, LEP students accounted for 8.2 percent of elementary school enrollment, 2.7 percent of middle school enrollment, and 2.5 percent of high school enrollment.
  • During the period studied, the percentage of LEP students scoring at the proficient or advanced level in reading and math increased in all grades studied (grades 3–8 and 10). However, the achievement gap in both subjects between LEP and non-LEP students ranged from 11 to 49 percentage points each year.
  • During the period studied, the achievement gap in reading and math between LEP and non-LEP students narrowed in grades 3–5 and grade 10; the achievement gap narrowed in reading in grades 6–8 but widened in math in grades 7 and 8.
4/24/2012
REL 2012131 A Descriptive Analysis of Enrollment and Achievement Among English Language Learner Students in the District of Columbia
The number of English language learner (ELL) students in District of Columbia public schools rose 1.8 percent from 2002/03 to 2008/09, whereas total student enrollment fell 6.3 percent. ELL student enrollment increased from 7.7 percent of total student enrollment in 2002/03 to 8.4 percent in 2008/09. These figures are of concern to educators because of the need to meet the No Child Left Behind Act goal of bringing all students to proficiency by 2014 and because nationally ELL students' achievement lags behind that of non-ELL students.

This report describes enrollment trends between 2002/03 and achievement trends between 2006/07 and 2008/09 among ELL students in District of Columbia public schools. It documents the achievement of ELL and non-ELL students in reading and math, as measured by districtwide assessments administered in grades 3–8 and 10. The study's main findings include:

  • From 2005/06 to 2008/09, Spanish speakers accounted for the largest percentage of ELL students, peaking at 74.9 percent in 2005/06. In 2008/09, Spanish (spoken by 60.4 percent of ELL students in the district) had the most speakers, followed by Amharic (2.4 percent), Chinese (2.2 percent), French (1.9 percent), and Vietnamese (1.7 percent). ELL students speaking "other" languages (languages other than the five most common in the district) accounted for 31.5 percent of ELL students in 2008/09.
  • Between 2006/07 and 2008/09, ELL students' performance in reading and math increased in all grades studied (grades 3–8 and 10). The increase ranged from 1.9 to 20.5 percentage points in reading and from 16.7 to 24.0 percentage points in math.
  • During the period studied, in every grade, the performance of ELL students relative to that of non-ELL students was stronger in math than in reading.
  • ELL students' performance was higher than that of non-ELL students in grade 3 reading and in grade 3 and 4 math in every year studied. From 2006/07 to 2008/09, the achievement gap in reading between ELL and non-ELL students widened in grade 8, narrowed in grades 7 and 10, closed in grade 5, and reversed in grade 6 (with ELL students' performance higher than that of non-ELL students). From 2006/07 and 2008/09, the achievement gap in math between ELL and non-ELL students narrowed in grade 7 and reversed in grades 5, 6, 8, and 10.
  • By 2008/09, ELL students' performance in reading was higher than their non-ELL peers in reading in two grades and all but one grade in math. This directly contrasts national trends, where performance is typically 20-30 percentage points higher among non-ELL students than among ELL students.
4/24/2012
REL 2012132 A Descriptive Analysis of Enrollment and Achievement Among English Language Learner Students in Delaware
The number of English language learner (ELL) students in Delaware public schools rose 91.7 percent from 2002/03 to 2008/09, whereas total enrollment increased 7.7 percent. ELL student enrollment increased from 3.0 percent of total student enrollment in 2002/03 to 5.4 percent in 2008/09. These figures are of concern to educators because of the large achievement gaps nationally between ELL and non-ELL students and the need to meet the No Child Left Behind Act goal of bringing all students to proficiency by 2014.
This report describes enrollment and achievement trends between 2002/03 and 2008/09 among ELL students in Delaware public schools. It documents achievement gaps between ELL and non-ELL students in reading and math state assessments in grades 2–10 and in science and social studies assessments in grades 4, 6, 8, and 11. The study's main findings include:

  • ELL students in Delaware spoke 81 languages in 2008/09, up from 60 in 2002/03. In 2008/09, Spanish (spoken by 77.2 percent of ELL students in the state) had the most speakers, followed by Creole (4.2 percent), Chinese (2.0 percent), and Gujarati (1.5 percent). ELL students speaking "other" languages (languages other than the 12 most common in the state) accounted for 7.2 percent of the ELL student population in 2008/09.
  • Between 2005/06 and 2008/09, ELL students' performance in reading increased in grades 3–10 but decreased in grade 2. During this time, ELL students' performance in math increased in grades 3–9, but decreased in grades 2 and 10.
  • Between 2002/03 and 2008/09, ELL students' performance in science increased in all grades studied (grades 4, 6, 8, and 11), and ELL students' performance in social studies increased in grades 4, 6, and 8, but decreased in grade 11.
  • Between 2005/06 and 2008/09, the overall achievement gap in reading between ELL and non-ELL students narrowed in all grades studied except grade 2, where an achievement gap formed and widened. The achievement gap in grade 3 reading narrowed, with ELL students' performance higher than that of non-ELL students in two of the four years studied.
  • Between 2005/06 and 2008/09, the overall achievement gap in math between ELL and non-ELL students narrowed in all grades studied except grades 2, 9, and 10, where the achievement gap widened. In grade 3, ELL students' performance was higher than that of non-ELL students in 2008/09 only.
  • Between 2002/03 and 2008/09, the achievement gap in science and social studies between ELL and non-ELL students narrowed in all grades studied except grade 8, where the achievement gap widened in science, and grade 11, where the achievement gap widened in both science and social studies.
4/24/2012
REL 20124002 Effects of Making Sense of SCIENCE Professional Development on the Achievement of Middle School Students, Including English Language Learners
The study, Effects of Making Sense of SCIENCE professional development on the achievement of middle school students, including English language learners, found that grade 8 teachers who received the professional development had greater content knowledge about force and motion and confidence in teaching force and motion than teachers who did not receive the professional development. However, there was no impact of the program on students’ physical science test scores.

The Making Sense of Science Force and Motion course for teachers incorporates physical science content, analysis of student work and thinking, and classroom instruction to develop teacher expertise about force and motion and science instruction. The course emphasizes inquiry-based instruction practices.
3/22/2012
REL 2012122 Teaching English Language Learner Students: Professional Standards in Elementary Education in Central Region States
This report on professional teaching standards in the Central Region examines what K-8 general education teachers are expected to know and be able to do in order to teach English language learner students. It reviews the standards for coverage of six topics that the research literature suggests are important for improving student achievement.
2/28/2012
REL 2012125 English Language Proficiency Levels of Limited-English-Proficient Students in Idaho
This study describes the proficiency levels of limited English proficient (LEP) students and LEP student subgroups on the Idaho English Language Assessment.
1/31/2012
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