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 Pub Number  Title  Date
NCES 2012212 Federal Education Tax Benefits: Who Receives Them and to What Extent Do They Shape the Price of College Attendance?
This Statistics in Brief applies IRS rules and data to a nationally representative sample of 2007–08 undergraduates to estimate who received education tax benefits and looks at the extent to which these benefits shaped their price of college attendance.
11/15/2011
NCEE 20114016 NCEE Evaluation Brief: Do Low-Income Students have Equal Access to the Highest-Performing Teachers?
Analyses using data from ten selected districts describes the prevalence of teachers ranked in the top 20 percent (highest-performing teachers). The overall patterns indicate that low-income students have unequal access, on average, to the districts’ highest-performing teachers at the middle school level but not at the elementary level. Within the ten districts studied, some have an under-representation of the highest-performing teachers in high-poverty elementary and middle schools. However, other districts have such under-representation only at the middle school level, and one district has a disproportionate share of the district’s highest-performing teachers in its high-poverty elementary schools.

These analyses were conducted as part of the implementation of an impact evaluation (Impact Evaluation Of Moving High-Performing Teachers to Low-Performing Schools) carried out by Mathematica Policy Research for the National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance within the Institute of Education Sciences. The analyses are in support of NCEE’s work to advance our understanding of teacher quality and strategies to improve it. The districts that are the subject of this evaluation brief include eight of the ten districts currently participating in the impact evaluation and two additional districts. The impact evaluation is looking at using monetary incentives to attract higher-performing teachers into low-achieving schools. For both this evaluation brief and the impact study, the highest-performing teachers in the tested grades and subjects within school districts are identified by conducting value-added analyses using student test scores. In the impact study, teachers are offered a series of bonus payments totaling up to $20,000 over two years for transferring into and remaining in targeted low-achieving schools within their district. A report from the first year of data collection from the impact evaluation is expected in 2012.
4/1/2011
NCES 2011218 Trends in Student Financing of Undergraduate Education: Selected Years, 1995–96 to 2007–08
Drawing on the 1995–96, 1999–2000, 2003–04, and 2007–08 National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS), these Web Tables present trends in financial aid that was awarded to undergraduate students attending postsecondary institutions in the United States. Data include price of attendance, tuition and fees, type of financial aid received from federal, state, and institutional sources, net price of attendance (price minus all grants), out-of-pocket net price (price minus all aid), and financial need. These are shown by enrollment and demographic characteristics such as sex, race/ethnicity, age, dependency status, family income, attendance status, and type of institution attended.
1/12/2011
WWC QRNYC0929 Toward Reduced Poverty Across Generations: Early Findings From New York City’s Conditional Cash Transfer Program
The WWC quick review of the report "Toward Reduced Poverty Across Generations: Early Findings From New York City's Conditional Cash Transfer Program" reviews a study that examined whether offering low-income families cash rewards for engaging in activities related to children's education, family preventive health care, and parental employment improves family and child outcomes. This quick review focuses specifically on the effects of the Opportunity NYC-Family Rewards program on children's core educational outcomes. The study covered the first two years of this ongoing project and followed more than 9,000 K-12th-graders. The study measured the effect of the Family Rewards program by comparing educational outcomes of students whose families were randomly assigned to participate in the program with students whose families were not given the opportunity to participate. Study authors reported that, of the more than 50 attendance and test-score outcomes examined for elementary and middle school students, the only statistically significant finding was a 2.9 percentage-point difference favoring the Family Rewards group in the percentage of K-5 students who were proficient on the state math test in Year 2 of the study. Of the more than 20 attendance and credit-accumulation outcomes examined for high school students, the study reported statistically significant positive effects of the program on outcomes in two categories: having an attendance rate of 95% or higher and attempting 11 or more credits. However, there were no program effects on the overall attendance rate or total number of credits earned. Of the more than 50 Regents exam outcomes examined, only six were statistically significant and suggest an increase in the number of students attempting and passing Regents exams. There were no significant effects on the four graduation outcomes examined. The WWC rated the research described in this report as meets WWC evidence standards but offers a word of caution to readers that study authors examined a large number of outcomes for a number of age groups and different points in time. Estimating such a large number of effects increases the possibility that some may be found to be statistically significant by chance. The authors did not adjust for this possibility when reporting the statistical significance of individual effects.
9/29/2010
NCES 2009004 Combined User's Manual for the ECLS-K Eighth-Grade and K-8 Full Sample Data Files and Electronic Codebooks
The Combined User's Manual includes a description of the design and instrumentation of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998-99, and information to help users access and use the data files and electronic codebook. It is reproduced on the public- and restricted-use data DVDs.
9/16/2010
NCES 2010162 Web Tables—Student Financing of Undergraduate Education: 2007–08
These Web Tables are a comprehensive source of information on financial aid that was awarded to undergraduate students attending postsecondary institutions in the United States during the 2007–08 academic year. Data include tuition and fees, price of attendance, type of financial aid received from federal, state, and institutional sources, net tuition (tuition and fees minus all grants), net price of attendance (price minus all grants), out-of-pocket net price (price minus all aid), and financial need. These are shown by enrollment and demographic characteristics such as dependency status, residence, race/ethnicity, gender, citizenship, family income, attendance status, and type of institution attended.
8/17/2010
NCES 2010181REV Undergraduate Financial Aid Estimates for Six States: 2007-08
These tables show the types and amounts of financial aid received by undergraduate students enrolled in Title IV-eligible public 2-year, public 4-year, private not-for-profit 4-year, and private for-profit degree-granting institutions in each of six states: California, Georgia, Illinois, Minnesota, New York and Texas. Data from the 2007-08 National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS:20008) were used to describe the distribution of aid at the state level, providing more detailed information about state-funded grants and the role of state grant programs in the awarding of financial aid. For each state and institution type, estimates include average in-state tuition and fees, average total price of attendance, and the percentages and characteristics of undergraduate students receiving any financial aid, grants, or student loans. The tables also provide information on net price (price minus grants), out-of-pocket net price (price minus total aid), average federal Expected Family Contribution (EFC), remaining need after financial aid, and students’ level of work and their annual earnings while enrolled in school.
11/5/2009
WWC 20094066 Helping Students Navigate the Path to College: What High Schools Can Do
Access to higher education remains a challenge for many students who face academic and informational barriers to college entry. This guide targets high schools and school districts, and focuses on effective practices that prepare students academically for college, assist them in completing the steps to college entry, and improve their likelihood of enrolling in college.
9/15/2009
NCES 2009156 A Profile of Successful Pell Grant Recipients: Time to Bachelor’s Degree and Early Graduate School Enrollment
This report describes characteristics of college graduates who received Pell Grants and compares them to graduates who were not Pell Grant recipients. For both groups of graduates, data from the Baccalaureate and Beyond Longitudinal Study (B&B:2000/01) were analyzed to determine the time it took them to complete a bachelor’s degree as well as the percentage who enrolled in graduate school within one year of college graduation. Key findings include the following:
  • About 36 percent of 1999-2000 bachelor's degree recipients received at least one Pell Grant while in college.
  • Higher percentages of Pell Grant recipients had at least one of several undergraduate risk characteristics (e.g., delaying postsecondary enrollment or failing to graduate from high school) than did nonrecipients.
  • Parents' education was the only factor consistently related to both time-to-degree and graduate school enrollment for Pell Grant recipients. Those whose parents did not attend college took longer to attain a bachelor’s degree and enrolled in graduate school at lower rates than recipients whose parents had a least a bachelor’s degree.
  • Although Pell Grant recipients had a longer median time-to-degree than nonrecipients, when controlling simultaneously for parents’ education, undergraduate risk characteristics, and transfer history, recipients had a shorter time-to-degree than nonrecipients.
7/21/2009
WWC QRPB0309 WWC Quick Review: Performance-Based Scholarships Study
The financial incentive program increased the percentage of community college students who were enrolled the second semester after random assignment (65%, compared with 50% for the control group). It also increased the average number of credits they earned during the first two semesters after random assignment (3.9 credits, compared with 2.8 for the control group).
3/31/2009
WWC IRDPTS06 Talent Search
Talent Search aims to help low-income and first-generation college students (those whose parents do not have four-year college degrees) complete high school and gain access to college through a combination of services designed to improve academic achievement and increase access to financial aid. Services include test taking and study skills assistance, academic advising, tutoring, career development, college campus visits, and financial aid application assistance.
12/28/2006
NCES 2007159 Where Are They Now? A Description of 1992-93 Bachelor's Degree Recipients 10 Years Later
Using data from the 2003 Baccalaureate and Beyond Longitudinal Study (B&B:93/03), this report provides an overview of the status of 1992–93 college graduates 10 years after graduation. The report presents highlights of these college graduates’ lives in 2003 in five areas—education after the bachelor’s degree, labor force participation, opinions about their undergraduate education, family status, and civic participation. In addition to presenting a basic profile of graduates’ lives in 2003, the report is also intended as a broad introduction to the kinds of data available in B&B:93/03. A table compendium with five sections corresponding to the five areas above provides additional detail about how graduate characteristics are associated with the highlighted outcomes as well as related experiences in each area. The estimates in this report represent about 1.2 million bachelor’s degree completers from 1992–93.
10/31/2006
NCES 2005150 Baccalaureate and Beyond Longitudinal Study 1993/2003 Data Analysis System (DAS) On-line
The DAS contains data from the 2003 Baccalaureate and Beyond Longitudinal Study (B&B:1993/2003). This study is the third follow-up of a national sample of students who completed bachelor degrees in academic year 1992-1993 and were first surveyed as part of the National Postsecondary Student Aid Study. This DAS allows users to conduct analyses on data gathered in this study while on-line via the web.
9/20/2006
NCES 2006032 ECLS-K: Combined User's Manual for the ECLS-K Fifth-Grade Data Files and Electronic Codebooks
The Combined User's Manual includes a description of the design and instrumentation of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998-99, and information to help users access and use the data files and electronic codebook. It is reproduced on the public- and restricted-use data CD.
3/27/2006
NCES 2002025 The Condition of Education 2002
The Condition of Education summarizes important developments and trends in education using the latest available data. The report, which is required by law, is an indicator report intended for a general audience of readers who are interested in education. The indicators represent a consensus of professional judgment on the most significant national measures of the condition and progress of education for which accurate data are available. The 2002 print edition includes 44 indicators in six main areas: (1) enrollment trends and student characteristics at all levels of the education system from preprimary education to adult learning; (2) student achievement and the longer term, enduring effects of education; (3) student effort and rates of progress through the educational system among different population groups; (4) the quality of elementary and secondary education in terms of courses taken, teacher characteristics, and other factors; (5) the context of postsecondary education; (6) and societal support for learning, including parental and community support for learning, and public and private financial support of education at all levels. This edition also includes special analyses on the environment, climate, and student outcomes at private schools and on the enrollment and persistence of nontraditional undergraduates.
5/31/2002
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