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Search Results: (16-30 of 43 records)

 Pub Number  Title  Date
REL 2015055 School mobility, dropout, and graduation rates across student disability categories in Utah
This report describes the characteristics of students with disabilities in Utah public schools, and presents the single-year mobility and dropout rates for students in grades 6–12, as well as the four-year cohort dropout and graduation rates, for students who started grade 9 for the first time in 2007/08 and constituted the 2011 cohort. Results are reported for students with disabilities as a group and then further disaggregated by each of the disability categories. Using statewide administrative data, the research team found that, as a group, Utah students with disabilities had poorer outcomes than their general education classmates, but outcomes varied by disability category, highlighting the heterogeneity among students with disabilities. Results indicate, for example, that students with emotional disturbance, multiple disabilities, intellectual disability, traumatic brain injury, or autism were at greatest risk of failing to graduate during the four-year high school time frame, with graduation rates below 50 percent. Students with autism, multiple disabilities, or intellectual disability had dropout rates lower than those of general education students and students with disabilities as a group but also had low graduation rates and the highest retention rates after four years. In contrast, students with hearing impairment/deafness had four-year graduation rates roughly on par with general education students. By disaggregating the various student outcomes by disability category, educators and policymakers gain new information about which students with disabilities are most in need of interventions to keep them on track to receive a high school diploma.
11/26/2014
REL 2014039 The Appropriateness of a California Student and Staff Survey for Measuring Middle School Climate
The purpose of this study was to examine the appropriateness of using student and staff self-report surveys—the California School Climate, Health, and Learning Survey (Cal-SCHLS)—to assess school climate in middle schools. The study examined (a) the domains of school climate assessed by the surveys; (b) the reliability of the surveys at both the respondent and school levels; (c) the stability of the survey measures over time; and (d) the relationship of the survey measures to student achievement and discipline. The results suggested that the Cal-SCHLS student survey can be used to validly and reliably assess the following six school-climate domains at the school level: (a) safety and connectedness; (b) caring relationships with adults; (c) meaningful participation; (d) substance use at schools; (e) bullying and discrimination; and (f) delinquency. The Cal-SCHLS teacher survey can also be used to validly and reliably assess six domains: (a) support and safety; (b) caring staff-student relationships; (c) staff peer relationships; (d) student health and engagement; (e) student delinquency; and (f) resource provision. The surveys may help educators identify building-level needs related to school climate, target supports and reforms, and monitor progress in climate improvement efforts.
9/23/2014
WWC PGELL19 Teaching Academic Content and Literacy to English Learners in Elementary and Middle School
As English learners face the double demands of building knowledge of a second language while learning complex grade-level content, teachers must find effective ways to make challenging content comprehensible for students. This updated English learner practice guide, Teaching Academic Content and Literacy to English Learners in Elementary and Middle School, provides four recommendations for teaching complex content to English learners while simultaneously building academic language and writing and oral language proficiency.
4/1/2014
NFES 2014801 Forum Guide to Supporting Data Access for Researchers: A Local Education Agency Perspective
This publication recommends a set of core practices, operations, and templates that can be adopted and adapted by LEAs as they consider how to respond to requests for both new and existing data about the education enterprise. .
12/4/2013
WWC SSR222 WWC Review of the Report "KIPP Middle Schools: Impacts on Achievement and Other Outcomes, Final Report"
The 2013 study, KIPP Middle Schools: Impacts on Achievement and Other Outcomes, Final Report, examined whether attending a Knowledge is Power Program (KIPP) middle school improved students’ academic performance for up to 4 years following enrollment. For the experimental portion of the study, researchers used admissions lotteries to place about 1,000 students into either a KIPP middle school or a traditional middle school. For the quasi-experimental portion of the study, researchers used baseline achievement and demographic characteristics to match 15,916 students in 41 KIPP middle schools with similar students who had attended non-KIPP public middle schools in the same school district in the previous year. Researchers then used state assessments in math, reading, science, and social studies to measure student achievement. The experimental portion of the study meets WWC evidence standards without reservations for the 1-year follow-up. However, the research on the later follow-ups meets standards with reservations because of the large number of students who stopped participating in the study. The quasi-experimental portion of the study meets WWC evidence standards with reservations; although the KIPP students and traditional public school students included in the analysis were well-matched, other differences may have existed between the groups that could have influenced student achievement.
11/19/2013
WWC IRL407 Read Naturally
Read Naturally is a supplemental reading program that aims to improve the reading fluency, accuracy, and comprehension skills of elementary and middle school students using a combination of texts, audio CDs, and computer software. The program uses different products that share a common fluency-building strategy. The strategy includes modeling of story reading, repeated reading of text for developing oral reading fluency, and systematic monitoring of student progress by teachers and the students themselves. The WWC found that the Read Naturally program has no discernible effects on alphabetics and comprehension, mixed effects on reading fluency, and potentially positive effects on general reading achievement for beginning readers. The intervention report includes studies of Read Naturally Masters Edition and Read Naturally Software Edition.
7/9/2013
WWC IRL625 Read Naturally
Read Naturally is a supplemental reading program designed to improve the reading fluency, accuracy, and comprehension of elementary and middle school students using a combination of books, audio CDs, and computer software. The program utilizes three main strategies: modeling of story reading, repeated reading of text, and systematic monitoring of student progress. The WWC found that Read Naturally has potentially positive effects on general literacy achievement for adolescent readers.
3/19/2013
WWC SSRSB10025 WWC Review of the Report "Evaluation of a Two-Year Middle-School Physical Education Intervention: M-SPAN"
The 2004 study, Evaluation of a Two-Year Middle-School Physical Education Intervention: M-SPAN, investigated the effect of the Middle School Physical Activity and Nutrition (M-SPAN) intervention on the physical activity level of middle school students in 24 public middle schools from six districts in Southern California. M-SPAN aims to increase physical activity in physical education (PE) classes and reduce students’ fat intake by encouraging healthy eating habits. For this 2-year study, schools were stratified by school district and then randomly assigned to either M-SPAN or a comparison condition. The study assessed the effectiveness of M-SPAN by examining moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), the amount of time students spent either walking or being very active, and other types of activities and PE lesson content across schools that received the M-SPAN training. Study authors reported that the M-SPAN intervention caused a statistically significant improvement in the amount of time students spent in MVPA. The WWC confirmed that the M-SPAN intervention improved the MVPA in schools by an average of 3 minutes per lesson across the 2-year period of the study. This study is a well-implemented randomized controlled trial, and the research described meets WWC evidence standards without reservations. The WWC cautions that the changes in observed MVPA (and other outcomes) may be in part due to (a) changes in MVPA in intervention schools, (b) high-activity students moving into the intervention schools or low-activity students moving out of the comparison schools, or (c) a combination of both effects. This study cannot separate these effects—it can only report on their combined impact. Additionally, because the study analyzed school level data, the magnitude of the effects reported cannot be directly compared to the magnitude of an effect of an intervention that uses student-level data for the analysis.
2/12/2013
NFES 2013801 Forum Guide to Taking Action with Education Data
The Forum Guide to Taking Action with Education Data provides stakeholders with practical information about the knowledge, skills, and abilities needed to more effectively access, interpret, and use education data to inform action. The document includes an overview of the evolving nature of data use, basic data use concepts, and a list of skills necessary for effectively using data. The Guide recommends a question-driven approach to data use, in which the following questions can help guide readers who need to use data to take action: What do I want to know? What data might be relevant? How will I access relevant data? What skills and tools do I need to analyze the data? What do the data tell me? What are my conclusions? What will I do? What effects did my actions have? and what are my next steps? The Briefs that accompany the Introduction are written for three key education audiences: Educators, School and District Leaders, and State Program Staff.
1/15/2013
WWC IRL0113 Talent Development Middle Grades Program
The Talent Development Middle Grades Program is a comprehensive reform model that transforms the structure and curriculum of large urban middle schools with the aim of improving student achievement and raising teacher and student expectations. Key features of the Talent Development Middle Grades Program include small learning communities, an evidence-based curriculum tied to standards, the use of teacher teams, professional development and support for teachers, and school–family–community connections. This review focuses on the effects of the Talent Development Middle Grades Program on student reading outcomes. Student Team Literature is the literacy component of the Talent Development Middle Grades Program, and is therefore relevant to this review in the Adolescent Literacy topic area.
1/15/2013
WWC SSRSOG12 WWC Review of the Report "Philadelphia's Renaissance Schools Initiative: 18 Month Interim Report"
The study examined the effects of Philadelphia's Renaissance Schools Initiative on students in K-8 schools after one year of implementation. The study compared outcomes from 11 Renaissance Schools to those from 72 comparison schools that had a School Performance Index of seven to ten. Study authors analyzed average student test scores in math and reading on the Pennsylvania System of School Assessment (PSSA) and average student attendance.
8/7/2012
NCEE 20124050 Effects of Making Sense of SCIENCE Professional Development on the Achievement of Middle School Students, Including English Language Learners

For report NCEE 2012-4002 Effects of Making Sense of SCIENCE Professional Development on the Achievement of Middle School Students, Including English Language Learners http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/edlabs/projects/project.asp?ProjectID=87

This file contains data from a study that evaluates the effects of the Making Sense of ScienceTM Force and Motion professional development program. The program is designed to improve teachers' pedagogical and science content knowledge. The Making Sense of ScienceTM Force and Motion course for teachers incorporates physical science content, analysis of student work and thinking, and classroom instruction to develop teacher expertise about force and motion and science instruction. The course emphasizes inquiry-based instruction practices.

The study found that grade 8 teachers who received the professional development had greater content knowledge about force and motion and confidence in teaching force and motion than teachers who did not receive the professional development. However, there was no impact of the program on students' physical science test scores.

The study was conducted from spring 2009 through spring 2010 in 137 schools served by 55 districts in Arizona and California. The study sample included 181 teachers who were randomly assigned to an intervention or control group (90 to intervention and 91 to control). Outcomes were measured for teachers during both the 2008/09 and 2009/10 school years and for students during the 2009/10 school year. The impact analyses included 133 teachers and 5,130 students in grade 8. The study's key outcome variables--teacher and student content knowledge in force and motion, student academic achievement in physical science, teacher confidence in teaching force in motion--were assessed with project administered tests (ATLAST's Test of Force and Motion), the California Standards Test in science, and teacher surveys.

6/18/2012
WWC PGMIM12 Improving Mathematical Problem Solving in Grades 4 Through 8
This practice guide provides five recommendations for improving students' mathematical problem solving in grades 4 through 8:
  1. Prepare problems and use them in whole-class instruction.
  2. Assist students in monitoring and reflecting on the problem-solving process.
  3. Teach students how to use visual representations.
  4. Expose students to multiple problem-solving strategies.
  5. Help students recognize and articulate mathematical concepts and notation.
  6. Each recommendation includes implementation steps and solutions for common roadblocks. The recommendations also summarize and rate supporting evidence. Supporting evidence is drawn form a range of literature, from rigorous experimental studies to expert reviews of practices and strategies in mathematics education. Evidence ratings reflect the degree to which each recommendation is supported by high-quality experimental and quasi-experimental design studies that meet WWC standards. This guide is for teachers, math coaches, other educators, and curriculum developers who want to improve the mathematical problem solving of students.

5/22/2012
REL 20124005 Evaluation of Quality Teaching for English Learners (QTEL) Professional Development
To add to the evidence base on effective strategies for teaching English language learner students, the 2006-2011 REL West at WestEd conducted a rigorous study of the impact on middle grades student achievement of a teacher professional development program.

The program, Quality Teaching for English Learners (QTEL), is an approach to improving the teaching of English language learner students. The program aims to enhance the ability of teachers to work with English language learner students and increase the quality of instruction for all other students in the mainstream classroom. QTEL summer institutes consist of seven days of professional development to provide a foundation for using new tools and processes for the academic and linguistic development of adolescent English language learner students.

This study, Evaluation of Quality Teaching for English Learners (QTEL) Professional Development, examined QTEL’s effects on student outcomes in English language arts and English language development, as measured by the California Standards Test and the California English Language Development Test. No significant effects of QTEL were found on student achievement. For teachers, no significant effects were found on attitudes, knowledge, or practice, as measured by the teacher survey, teacher knowledge assessment, and a classroom observation protocol, respectively.

The study sample included middle schools in urban and suburban areas of three Southern California counties. The study was conducted from 2007-2010.
3/29/2012
NCES 2012003 TIMSS 1999 Video Study of eighth-grade mathematics and science teaching restricted-use database and videos
The TIMSS 1999 Video Study focused on eighth-grade mathematics and science teaching in seven countries, including the United States. The data collected from the study are now available under a restricted-use license.
The database includes:
  • full-length videos of grade 8 mathematics and science teaching
  • transcripts (in original language and English)
  • background questionnaires
  • ancillary classroom materials (e.g., worksheets, textbook pages)
  • results of coding of the video data
Separately, two technical reports-one for the mathematics portion of the study and another for the science portion--are available on the NCES website for downloading (NCES 2003012 and NCES 2011049). The technical reports include information on how the study was conducted as well as the coding manual and a data user's guide.
2/16/2012
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