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 Pub Number  Title  Date
REL 2017235 Examining school-level reading and math proficiency trends and changes in achievement gaps for grades 3-8 in Florida, Mississippi, and North Carolina
The purpose of this study was to use growth curve modeling to investigate school-level reading and mathematics achievement trends on the state accountability assessment in Florida, Mississippi, and North Carolina for grades 3-8. In addition, this study investigated school-level achievement trends for race/ethnicity subgroups and for free or reduced-price lunch eligibility to determine if significant changes in achievement gaps occurred over the 4-6 years studied for each state. Results indicated that in general, average school-level proficiency increased for most subgroups across grades and subjects in all three states. In addition, reductions in achievement gaps were observed for most grades in reading and mathematics. However, achievement gaps remained large despite the observed reductions. The use of growth curve modeling in the current study provides stakeholders in Florida, Mississippi, and North Carolina with a more in-depth understanding of trends in school-level proficiency than would have been possible using just the sample mean.
4/13/2017
NCES 2017056 Certification Status and Experience of U.S. Public School Teachers: Variations Across Student Subgroups
This report provides a snapshot of the extent to which U.S. public schools students are taught by certified and experienced teachers using two available datasets. The Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS) provides a comprehensive picture, as it includes teachers of K–12 students in all subjects and the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) provides a picture specific to grades 4 and 8. In addition, NAEP data are directly related to teachers of two key subjects: reading and mathematics. SASS data are available for the 2011–12 school year and NAEP data are available for 2013 and 2015.
3/21/2017
REL 2017212 How are middle school climate and academic performance related across schools and over time?
The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between school climate and academic performance in two different ways: (1) by comparing the academic performance of different schools with different levels of school climate and (2) by examining how changes in a school's climate were associated with changes in its students' academic achievement. To examine how school climate and academic performance are related, this study analyzed grade 7 student data from 2004/05 to 2010/11 from the California Healthy Kids Survey, the California Standardized Testing and Reporting program, and the California Basic Educational Data System for 978 middle schools in California. School climate was measured by a set of student survey questions that assessed students' perceptions about six domains of school climate. Schools with positive school climates were those in which students reported high levels of safety/connectedness, caring relationships with adults, and meaningful student participation, as well as low levels of substance use at school, bullying/discrimination, and student delinquency. Regression models were used to estimate the relationship between student-reported school climate and students' average academic performance across schools. Regression models were also used to estimate how, for a given school, academic performance changes as school climate changes. All models included controls for racial/ethnic composition, percentage of English learners, and percentage of students eligible for free/reduced-price meals. The study found that (1) middle schools with higher levels of positive student-reported school climate exhibited higher levels of academic performance; (2) increases in a school's level of positive student-reported school climate were associated with simultaneous increases in that school's academic achievement; and (3) within-school increases in academic achievement associated with school climate increases were substantially smaller than the academic performance differences across schools with different school climate levels. As positive school climate is continuing to gain more attention as a lever to improve student learning, there is increasing interest in how improvements in school climate are related to improvements in academic performance. Most studies examining the school climate-academic performance relationship compare the academic achievement across schools with different levels of school climate. Although the results of this study found that schools with high levels of positive school climate exhibited substantially higher levels of academic performance than their counterparts with low levels of positive school climate, such differences across schools were not an accurate guide for predicting the magnitude of school-specific gains in academic performance associated with increases in school climate.
1/31/2017
WWC IRL665 READ 180
This What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) report on READ 180 updates the WWC's 2009 review of the program to incorporate reviews of 71 new studies and assess all studies against current WWC standards. READ 180 is a reading program designed for struggling readers who are reading two or more years below grade level. Based on this updated review of the research, the WWC found READ 180 to have positive effects on comprehension and general literacy achievement, potentially positive effects on reading fluency, and no discernible effects on alphabetics for adolescent readers.
12/1/2016
REL 2017202 The characteristics and education outcomes of American Indian students in grades 6–12 in North Carolina
The purpose of this study was to compare American Indian students in grades 6–12 in North Carolina to all other students in the same grades both within the same schools and statewide on student demographics, school characteristics, and education outcomes. The North Carolina State Advisory Council on Indian Education (SACIE) requested this research based on a prior report identifying achievement gaps between American Indian students and White students. The primary source of quantitative data for this study is longitudinal administrative data provided to the Education Policy Initiative at Carolina by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction (NCDPI). These data include student-level outcomes for all students in grades 6–12 in North Carolina public schools for the school years 2010/11 through 2013/14. Outcomes considered include state test scores, attendance, retention in grade, advanced course taking, graduation rates, and disciplinary referrals. Quantitative analyses include all American Indian students in grades 6–12 in North Carolina public schools for school years 2010/11 through 2013/14. Students of other ethnicities in the same grades and years both within the same schools and statewide serve as comparison groups. Descriptive analyses compare averages for all student characteristics, school characteristics, and education outcomes for American Indian students compared to their within school and statewide peers. Regression analyses using multilevel modeling were used examine the extent to which controlling for student, school, and teacher characteristics accounts for differences in outcomes between American Indian students and their peers. The analyses found that American Indian students are demographically different from non-American Indian students statewide, but similar to other students attending the same schools. Schools attended by American Indian students are more likely to be rural and in the Coastal plain. American Indians also tend to attend schools that serve more economically disadvantaged students and more disadvantaged minority students. Across all middle school and high school standardized tests, American Indian students have lower average scores than other students statewide and within the same schools. American Indian students are absent more often on average than their peers both statewide and within the same school, are less likely to take advanced courses, and graduate at lower rates, but are equally likely to be retained in grade as their peers. When school and student demographics are held constant, the size of the gaps on most outcomes between American Indian students and their peers both within the same schools and statewide are substantially reduced.
11/17/2016
NFES 2017016 Forum Guide to Data Visualization: A Resource for Education Agencies
The purpose of this publication is to recommend data visualization practices that will help education agencies communicate data meaning in visual formats that are accessible, accurate, and actionable for a wide range of education stakeholders. Although this resource is designed for staff in education agencies, many of the visualization principles apply to other fields as well.
10/31/2016
NFES 2017017 Forum Guide to Collecting and Using Disaggregated Data on Racial/Ethnic subgroups
The Forum Guide to Collecting and Using Disaggregated Data on Racial/Ethnic Subgroups discusses strategies for collecting data on more detailed racial/ethnic subgroups than the seven categories used in federal reporting. This guide is intended to help state and district personnel learn more about data disaggregation in the field of education, decide whether this effort might be appropriate for them, and, if so, how to implement or continue a data disaggregation project. Access to and analysis of more detailed—that is, disaggregated—data can be a useful tool for improving educational outcomes for small groups of students who otherwise would not be distinguishable in the aggregated data used for federal reporting. Disaggregating student data can help schools and communities plan appropriate programs, decide which interventions to select, use limited resources where they are needed most, and see important trends in educational outcomes and achievement.
9/28/2016
REL 2016224 Self-study guide for implementing literacy interventions in Grades 3-8
The Grades 3–8 Self-Study Guide for Implementing Literacy Interventions was developed to help district- and school-based practitioners conduct self-studies for planning and implementing literacy interventions. It is intended to promote reflection about current strengths and challenges in planning for implementation of literacy interventions, spark conversations among staff, and identify areas for improvement. This guide provides a template for data collection and guiding questions for discussion that may improve the implementation of literacy interventions.
9/22/2016
REL 2016122 A Review of the Literature to Identify Leading Indicators Related to Hispanic STEM Postsecondary Educational Outcomes
The purpose of this study was to review recent peer-reviewed studies in order to identify malleable factors measured in K–12 settings that are related to students' postsecondary STEM success, particularly for Hispanic students. Postsecondary STEM success was defined as enrollment in, persistence in, and completion of postsecondary STEM majors or degrees. Twenty-three relevant studies were identified, yet only 4 examined K–12 factors predictive of postsecondary STEM success specifically for Hispanic students. The review found that the number of high school mathematics and science courses taken, and the level of those courses is a consistent predictor of postsecondary STEM outcomes for all student subgroups. However, the literature indicates that minority students, including Hispanics, were less likely to take the highest-level mathematics and science courses. Students' interest and confidence in STEM at the K–12 levels was also predictive of postsecondary STEM success. Yet, despite lower levels of postsecondary STEM success, some studies indicate racial/ethnic minority and White students had similar levels of interest and confidence in STEM. The reviewed research suggests that reducing disparities in mathematics and science preparation between Hispanic and White students and increasing the rates at which Hispanic students take high-level mathematics and science classes has promise for informing interventions designed to improve STEM outcomes.
4/19/2016
NCES 2016063 Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS) 2013 U.S. public-use data files and documentation
The TALIS 2013 U.S. public-use data files and documentation include the following: U.S. national TALIS 2013 data in ASCII text format, including variables unique to the United States; SPSS data files; SAS control files for reading the data and producing SAS system files; codebooks; illustrative code for merging school and teacher-level files; a Read Me file, and a Quick Guide. The U.S. TALIS 2013 data files are formatted so that they can be easily merged with the TALIS international data files, available from the OECD at http://stats.oecd.org/Index.aspx?datasetcode=talis_2013%20. Users of this data should also consult the TALIS 2013 U.S. Technical Report available for viewing and downloading at http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2015010.
2/26/2016
NCES 2016064 Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS) 2013 U.S. restricted-use data files and documentation
The TALIS 2013 U.S. restricted-use data files and documentation include the following: U.S. national TALIS 2013 data in ASCII text format, including variables unique to the United States; SPSS data files; SAS control files for reading the data and producing SAS system files; codebooks; illustrative code for merging school and teacher-level files; a Read Me file, and a Quick Guide. The TALIS 2013 U.S. restricted-use data files include NCES school IDs that facilitate merging with the Common Core of Data (CCD) for public schools and the Private School Universe Survey (PSS) for private schools. Users of this data should also consult the TALIS 2013 U.S. Technical Report available for viewing and downloading at http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2015010.
2/26/2016
NCES 2015118 Documentation for the School Attendance Boundary Survey (SABS): School Year 2013-2014
The School Attendance Boundary Survey (SABS) data file contains school attendance boundaries for regular schools with grades kindergarten through twelfth in the 50 states and the District of Columbia for the 2013-2014 school year. Prior to this survey, a national fabric of attendance boundaries was not freely available to the public. The geography of school attendance boundaries provides new context for researchers who were previously limited to state and district level geography.
8/17/2015
REL 2015055 School mobility, dropout, and graduation rates across student disability categories in Utah
This report describes the characteristics of students with disabilities in Utah public schools, and presents the single-year mobility and dropout rates for students in grades 6–12, as well as the four-year cohort dropout and graduation rates, for students who started grade 9 for the first time in 2007/08 and constituted the 2011 cohort. Results are reported for students with disabilities as a group and then further disaggregated by each of the disability categories. Using statewide administrative data, the research team found that, as a group, Utah students with disabilities had poorer outcomes than their general education classmates, but outcomes varied by disability category, highlighting the heterogeneity among students with disabilities. Results indicate, for example, that students with emotional disturbance, multiple disabilities, intellectual disability, traumatic brain injury, or autism were at greatest risk of failing to graduate during the four-year high school time frame, with graduation rates below 50 percent. Students with autism, multiple disabilities, or intellectual disability had dropout rates lower than those of general education students and students with disabilities as a group but also had low graduation rates and the highest retention rates after four years. In contrast, students with hearing impairment/deafness had four-year graduation rates roughly on par with general education students. By disaggregating the various student outcomes by disability category, educators and policymakers gain new information about which students with disabilities are most in need of interventions to keep them on track to receive a high school diploma.
11/26/2014
REL 2014039 The Appropriateness of a California Student and Staff Survey for Measuring Middle School Climate
The purpose of this study was to examine the appropriateness of using student and staff self-report surveys—the California School Climate, Health, and Learning Survey (Cal-SCHLS)—to assess school climate in middle schools. The study examined (a) the domains of school climate assessed by the surveys; (b) the reliability of the surveys at both the respondent and school levels; (c) the stability of the survey measures over time; and (d) the relationship of the survey measures to student achievement and discipline. The results suggested that the Cal-SCHLS student survey can be used to validly and reliably assess the following six school-climate domains at the school level: (a) safety and connectedness; (b) caring relationships with adults; (c) meaningful participation; (d) substance use at schools; (e) bullying and discrimination; and (f) delinquency. The Cal-SCHLS teacher survey can also be used to validly and reliably assess six domains: (a) support and safety; (b) caring staff-student relationships; (c) staff peer relationships; (d) student health and engagement; (e) student delinquency; and (f) resource provision. The surveys may help educators identify building-level needs related to school climate, target supports and reforms, and monitor progress in climate improvement efforts.
9/23/2014
WWC PGELL19 Teaching Academic Content and Literacy to English Learners in Elementary and Middle School
As English learners face the double demands of building knowledge of a second language while learning complex grade-level content, teachers must find effective ways to make challenging content comprehensible for students. This updated English learner practice guide, Teaching Academic Content and Literacy to English Learners in Elementary and Middle School, provides four recommendations for teaching complex content to English learners while simultaneously building academic language and writing and oral language proficiency.
4/1/2014
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