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 Pub Number  Title  Date
REL 2020031 How Legacy High School Students Use Their Flexible Time
Legacy High School in Bismarck Public Schools, North Dakota, personalizes education through flexible time, which allows students to choose how they spend a portion of the school day, outside of their regularly scheduled classes. This report describes how students at Legacy High School used their flexible time and whether their use of flexible time varied by demographic characteristics and academic achievement level. The study used data that Legacy High School collected through a survey tool. Results show that students had approximately 80 minutes of flexible time on average per day and spent 19 percent of this time on academic pursuits. These findings did not vary significantly by academic achievement level or demographic characteristics.
7/21/2020
NCES 2020082 Male and Female High School Students’ Expectations for Working In a Health-Related Field
This Data Point is based on data from the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09), a nationally representative, longitudinal study of more than 23,000 ninth-graders in 2009. Follow-up surveys were administered to the cohort in 2012 and 2013. It examines students’ expectations for a job in healthcare at age 30 when they were freshmen, and again in the spring of 2012. It provides a description of the percentage of students who expected to have a job in healthcare at age 30 in both 2009 and 2012, those who changed their expectations, and those who did not expect a job in healthcare at either time. It also describes differences between males and females in expectations for a job in healthcare.
6/9/2020
NCES 2019430 Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, and Dual-Enrollment Courses: Availability, Participation, and Related Outcomes for 2009 Ninth-Graders: 2013
Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate (IB), and dual-enrollment courses are generally regarded as academically rigorous courses for high school students. These Web Tables provide the most recent national statistics on the availability of these academically rigorous courses and programs, the percentage of graduates who earn high school credits in them, and the postsecondary outcomes of students who earned varying numbers of such credits. They use nationally representative survey and transcript data collected in the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09).
8/1/2019
NCES 2019052 Documentation to the 2016-17 Common Core of Data (CCD) Universe Files (2019-052)
These data files provide new data for the universe of public elementary and secondary schools and agencies in the United States in school year 2016–17.
1/16/2019
NCES 2019015 Parent and Student Expectations of Highest Education Level
The High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09) is a nationally representative, longitudinal study of over 23,000 9th graders in 2009. This study follows students throughout their secondary and postsecondary years assessing student trajectories, major fields of study, and career paths. The Base Year collection occurred in 2009, with a First Follow-up in 2012 and a Second Follow-up in 2016. Parents were asked to select the highest level of education that they expected their child to complete. At several points over time, students were asked to select the highest level of education they expected themselves to complete.
1/8/2019
NCES 2019123 Reasons High School Students Change Their Educational Setting
This report is based on data from the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09), a nationally representative, longitudinal study of more than 23,000 ninth-graders in 2009. The cohort was surveyed again in spring 2012 when most students were in the eleventh grade. The 2012 survey included questions about whether students had left their base-year school and asked the reasons why. This Data Point focuses on the 11.5 percent of students in the HSLS cohort who reported that they changed their educational setting by transferring schools or becoming homeschooled between the time they were surveyed in 2009 and the time they were surveyed in 2012.
11/13/2018
NCES 2018127 Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) Advanced 1995 and 2015 U.S. public-use datafile
This datafile contains the U.S. TIMSS Advanced 2015 data, including data that were collected only in the United States and not included on the international database available from the IEA. The additional data relate to the race and ethnicity of students and the percentage of students in a school eligible for the Federal free and reduced-price lunch program, among other variables. This datafile is intended to be used in conjunction with the international datafile available from the IEA.

A User Guide to the data is included in the U.S. TIMSS 2015 and TIMSS Advanced 1995 & 2015 Technical Report, which is available online separately (publication number 2018020).
11/1/2018
NCES 2018128 Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) Advanced 1995 and 2015 U.S. restricted-use datafiles
This datafile contains school IDs that can be linked to the public-use U.S. TIMSS Advanced 1995 and 2015 datafiles to allow for merging with data from the Common Core of Data (CCD) and Private School Universe Survey (PSS). This datafiles can only be obtained by those who apply for a restricted-use license through NCES. Information on how to merge the restricted-use datafiles with the U.S. TIMSS Advanced 1995 and 2015 public-use datafiles is included.

A User Guide to the data is included in the U.S. TIMSS 2015 and TIMSS Advanced 1995 & 2015 Technical Report, which is available online separately (publication number 2018020).
11/1/2018
NCES 2018020 U.S. TIMSS 2015 and TIMSS Advanced 1995 & 2015 Technical Report and User's Guide
The U.S. TIMSS 2015 and TIMSS Advanced 1995 & 2015 Technical Report and User's Guide provides an overview of the design and implementation in the United States of the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) 2015 and TIMSS Advanced 1995 & 2015, along with information designed to facilitate access to the U.S. TIMSS 2015 and TIMSS Advanced 1995 & 2015 data.
11/1/2018
NCES 2019404 What High Schoolers and Their Parents Know About Public 4-Year Tuition and Fees in Their State
This Statistics in Brief describes high school student perceptions of the cost of college using data from the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09). The analyses examine the accuracy of students' and parents' estimates of public 4-year college tuition and mandatory fees in their states by comparing their estimates with actual tuition and fee amounts obtained from the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS). The report also examines students' perceptions about college affordability and their plans to enroll in college.
10/10/2018
NCES 2018088 High School Students' Views on Who Influences Their Thinking about Education and Careers
This Statistics in Brief report uses data from the 2012 follow-up of the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 to examine who public high school students view as their main influence when considering education after high school and careers.
1/23/2018
NCES 2017437 Early Millennials: The Sophomore Class of 2002 a Decade Later
This Statistical Analysis Report examines the early adulthood milestones of 2002 high school sophomores as of 2012. It reports on key outcomes, including high school completion, enrollment in postsecondary education, progress toward or completion of a college degree, family formation (marriage and having children), and employment status and earnings. The analysis of key postsecondary education and employment milestones control for demographic and high school academic characteristics that are associated with such outcomes. The analysis uses nationally representative data from the Education Longitudinal Study of 2002 (ELS:2002).
6/29/2017
NCES 2017005 The Education and Work Plans of Public High School Students
This Data Point looks at public high school students’ education and work plans as of 2012.
5/10/2017
NCES 2017111 Public High School Students' Use of Graduation, Career, or Education Plans
This Data Point looks at public high school students’ use of graduation, career, or education plans as of 2012. The data used in this report were drawn from a nationally representative, longitudinal survey of students who were in the ninth grade in 2009—the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009.
5/10/2017
REL 2017216 Earning college credits in high school: Options, participation, and outcomes for Oregon students
To increase students' postsecondary attainment, many states are promoting accelerated college credit (ACC) options in high school such as Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, and dual-credit courses. This study describes the various ACC options available to Oregon students and the characteristics of the students who enroll in them. Using information from college websites and dual-credit coordinators--along with data from state agency and community college databases in Oregon--the study explores which students participate in ACC and examines participation by gender, racial/ethnic group, and eligibility for free or reduced-price lunch. Findings show that Oregon has a variety of ACC options available at public institutions, but cost, eligibility requirements, and geographic coverage of these options vary greatly across institutions. In addition, Oregon has higher rates of community college dual-credit participation than the national average and Oregon students taking dual-credit courses through a community college typically enroll and earn credit in multiple courses. While most students earn credit after enrolling in a community college dual-credit course, students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch pass those courses at lower rates than students who are not eligible. Also, community college dual-credit participants are more likely to be White, female, high achievers, and not eligible for free or reduced-price lunch. Males of all racial and ethnic groups participate in community college dual credit at lower rates than females; in each racial or ethnic group, the gender gap in participation is similar. Oregon stakeholders can use the study findings to better understand ACC options in the state and gaps in access that currently exist. Nationally, this study provides an example for other states of potentially useful data collection and analyses that could inform improvements to ACC programs.
3/9/2017
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