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 Pub Number  Title  Date
NCES 2018117 Trends in High School Dropout and Completion Rates in the United States: 2014
This report draws on an array of nationally representative surveys and administrative datasets to present statistics on high school dropout and completion rates. The report includes estimates of the percentage of students who drop out in a given 12-month period (event dropout rates), the percentage of young people in a specified age range who are high school dropouts (status dropout rates), and the percentage of young people in a specified age range who hold high school credentials (status completion rates). In addition, the report includes data on the percentage of students who graduate within four years of starting ninth grade (adjusted cohort graduation rates) and an estimated on-time graduation rate used to examine long-term trends (averaged freshman graduation rate. This report updates a series of NCES reports on high school dropout and completion rates that began in 1988.
2/22/2018
NCES 2017437 Early Millennials: The Sophomore Class of 2002 a Decade Later
This Statistical Analysis Report examines the early adulthood milestones of 2002 high school sophomores as of 2012. It reports on key outcomes, including high school completion, enrollment in postsecondary education, progress toward or completion of a college degree, family formation (marriage and having children), and employment status and earnings. The analysis of key postsecondary education and employment milestones control for demographic and high school academic characteristics that are associated with such outcomes. The analysis uses nationally representative data from the Education Longitudinal Study of 2002 (ELS:2002).
6/29/2017
REL 2017206 Characteristics and education outcomes of Utah high school dropouts who re-enrolled
While numerous studies have examined the national dropout crisis, comparatively little is known about students who drop out but later return to high school. Following a cohort of students expected to graduate from Utah public schools in 2011 after four years of high school, this report describes the extent of dropout and reenrollment statewide; how dropout and reenrollment rates differed by demographic characteristics; how academic progress differed for re-enrollees prior to leaving school compared to students who graduated without an interruption in enrollment and dropouts who did not return; and the final high school outcomes of dropouts who came back to school. Findings indicate that while three-fourths of the students in the 2011 graduating cohort earned a diploma in four years, about a fifth of the students dropped out and, among them, about a fifth returned to school by 2011. Students with certain demographic characteristics were more likely to drop out and less likely to reenroll, such as Black students and English learner students, putting them at particular risk for not graduating. The percentage of dropouts who reenrolled decreased with each year of school, but some re-enrollees still earned a diploma. Among those who had dropped out and reenrolled by 2011, 26 percent graduated on time with the cohort. Among those who dropped out and reenrolled by 2013—extending the analysis two years beyond the conventional four years of high school—the graduation rate for re-enrollees increased to 30 percent. Results show that while dropping out is not necessarily a permanent outcome, re-enrollees as a group are at risk for poor graduation outcomes. Identifying and supporting dropouts who return for another chance to graduate can boost their chances to earn a diploma.
11/10/2016
NCES 2016117REV Trends in High School Dropout and Completion Rates in the United States: 2013
This report draws on an array of nationally representative surveys and administrative datasets to present statistics on high school dropout and completion rates. The report includes estimates of the percentage of students who drop out in a given 12-month period (event dropout rates), the percentage of young people in a specified age range who are high school dropouts (status dropout rates), and the percentage of young people in a specified age range who hold high school credentials (status completion rates). In addition, the report includes data on the percentage of students who graduate within four years of starting ninth grade (adjusted cohort graduation rates), an estimated on-time graduation rate used to examine long-term trends (averaged freshman graduation rate), and data on GED test takers. This edition’s spotlight indicator explores data on high school students who drop out but later reenter high school (stopouts) and the reasons that students cite for dropping out of school. This report updates a series of NCES reports on high school dropout and completion rates that began in 1988.
10/25/2016
NCES 2016144 The Condition of Education 2016
NCES has a mandate to report to Congress on the condition of education by June 1 of each year. The Condition of Education 2016 summarizes important developments and trends in education using the latest available data. The 2016 report presents 43 key indicators on the status and condition of education and are grouped under four main areas: (1) population characteristics, (2) participation in education, (3) elementary and secondary education, and (4) postsecondary education. Also included in the report are 3 Spotlight indicators that provide a more in-depth look at some of the data.
5/26/2016
NCES 2015038 High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09) 2013 Update and High School Transcripts Restricted-use Data File
These restricted-use files for the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09) include data collected in the Base Year (2009), First Follow-up (2012), 2013 Update and High School Transcripts (2014). This release includes both composite variables as well as variables from questionnaires and high school transcripts that were suppressed on the public-use version of the data files.
7/1/2015
NCES 2015064 High School Dropouts and Stopouts: Demographic Backgrounds, Academic Experiences, Engagement, and School Characteristics
The high school dropout problem continues to be a serious concern for secondary education in the United States. Some dropouts fail to ever return to school. Others however, do return after extended absences. These returning students, typically referred to as stopouts, may be quite different from dropouts who fail to return. In these Web Tables, the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09) base-year and first follow-up surveys are used to examine both stopouts and dropouts. Current dropouts are those students who left school between 2009 and 2012 and neither were enrolled in school nor had earned a high school diploma or an alternative credential at the time of the first follow-up in spring 2012. Stopouts are those students who had experienced at least one 4-week or longer period of time out of high school between 2009 and 2012 but were enrolled in school at the time of the 2012 first follow-up interview. These Web Tables present information on both groups’ demographic characteristics, academic experiences, school engagement behaviors, and the characteristics of schools they attended in 9th grade. To provide a context for comparison, all tables also include students who did not drop out of school between grades 9 and 11 (referred to as continuous students).
5/20/2015
REL 2015079 Early Identification of High School Graduation Outcomes in Oregon Leadership Network Schools
The purpose of this study was to examine student characteristics related to completing high school within four years, with particular emphasis on graduation outcomes for male and English language learner students. The authors looked at a cohort of students who began grade 9 in the 2007/08 school year in four Oregon districts. Factors related to three key graduation outcomes were analyzed: dropping out within four years of starting grade 9, graduating on time (within four years), and staying in school but not graduating on time. Findings confirmed previous studies showing that attendance and grade point average (GPA) in grades 8 and 9 are significantly associated with graduating on time. In addition, race/ethnicity and achievement on standardized tests are less predictive of graduating on time after other factors are considered. When the influence of demographic, behavioral, and academic characteristics were considered at the same time, only gender, status as an English language learner, and attendance and GPA in grades 8 and 9 were associated with graduation outcomes. Practitioners and policymakers concerned with early identification of students at-risk of not graduating on time could consider these early warning indicators: grade 8 attendance rates below 80 percent; grade 8 GPA of less than 2.0; grade 9 attendance rates below 80 percent, and grade 9 GPA of less than 2.0.
4/29/2015
NCES 2015066 Early High School Dropouts: What Are Their Characteristics?
This Data Point uses data from the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09) to examine the extent to which high school students drop out of school between the ninth and eleventh grade and how dropout rates vary by sex, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. HSLS:09 is a nationally representative, longitudinal study of more than 23,000 ninth-graders in 2009. HSLS:09 surveyed students, their parents, math and science teachers, school administrators, and school counselors.
2/19/2015
REL 2015055 School mobility, dropout, and graduation rates across student disability categories in Utah
This report describes the characteristics of students with disabilities in Utah public schools, and presents the single-year mobility and dropout rates for students in grades 6–12, as well as the four-year cohort dropout and graduation rates, for students who started grade 9 for the first time in 2007/08 and constituted the 2011 cohort. Results are reported for students with disabilities as a group and then further disaggregated by each of the disability categories. Using statewide administrative data, the research team found that, as a group, Utah students with disabilities had poorer outcomes than their general education classmates, but outcomes varied by disability category, highlighting the heterogeneity among students with disabilities. Results indicate, for example, that students with emotional disturbance, multiple disabilities, intellectual disability, traumatic brain injury, or autism were at greatest risk of failing to graduate during the four-year high school time frame, with graduation rates below 50 percent. Students with autism, multiple disabilities, or intellectual disability had dropout rates lower than those of general education students and students with disabilities as a group but also had low graduation rates and the highest retention rates after four years. In contrast, students with hearing impairment/deafness had four-year graduation rates roughly on par with general education students. By disaggregating the various student outcomes by disability category, educators and policymakers gain new information about which students with disabilities are most in need of interventions to keep them on track to receive a high school diploma.
11/26/2014
NCES 2014364 Education Longitudinal Study of 2002 (ELS:2002) Third Follow-Up Data File Documentation
This manual has been produced to familiarize data users with the overall Education Longitudinal Study of 2002 (ELS:2002) design. It also seeks to familiarize users with the procedures followed for data collection and processing over the four rounds of the study, with particular emphasis on the third follow-up. Additionally, this document provides information that will support research and policy analyses. The National Center for Education Statistics hopes that analysts will find that the ELS:2002 data are organized and equipped in a manner that facilitates users’ straightforward production of statistical summaries and analyses of the ELS:2002 youth cohorts as they embark on the transition from high school to postsecondary education and to the labor market, and assume yet other roles that serve as markers of newly achieved adult status.
1/28/2014
NCES 2014360 High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09) First Follow-up: A First Look at Fall 2009 Ninth-Graders in 2012
This First Look introduces new data from the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 collected in the spring of 2012 when most sample members were in their 11th-grade year. The analyses examine students’ educational expectations; students’ math performance on an algebra assessment, including gains since the 9th grade; students’ math and science efficacy; and students’ initial planning for postsecondary educational application and enrollment.
10/1/2013
NCES 2013309REV Public School Graduates and Dropouts from the Common Core of Data: School Year 2009–10
This report presents the number of high school graduates, the Averaged Freshman Graduation Rate (AFGR), and the dropout data for grades 9–12 for public schools in school year 2009–10 as reported by State Education Agencies to the NCES Common Core of Data Universe Survey of public elementary and secondary institutions.
1/22/2013
NCES 2012025 Characteristics of GED Recipients in High School: 2002–06
This Issue Brief uses the Education Longitudinal Study of2002 to compare the demographics, high school experiences, and academic achievement of 10th graders who four years later were GED recipients, high school graduates or high school dropouts.
11/16/2011
NCES 2011312 Public School Graduates and Dropouts from the Common Core of Data: School Year 2008–09
This report presents findings associated with public high school graduation and event dropout counts for the 2008–09 school year. These data were collected as part of the Common Core of Data Survey Collection, a universe collection of public schools operating in the United States and associated other jurisdictions.
5/3/2011
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