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 Pub Number  Title  Date
NCES 2020125 Dual or Concurrent Enrollment in Public Schools in the United States
This Data Point examines dual or concurrent enrollment at public schools in the United States with students enrolled in any of grades 9–12.
12/1/2020
REL 2021038 Algebra I and College Preparatory Diploma Outcomes among Virginia Students Who Completed Algebra I in Grades 7–9
In Virginia, 52 percent of students graduated from high school with a college preparatory diploma in 2019. However, 31 percent of economically disadvantaged students and 15 percent of English learner students graduated with a college preparatory diploma. Recognizing the importance of mathematics in preparing students for college and careers, Virginia leaders are seeking to improve mathematics instructional programs and associated policy. As one part of their effort, this study was designed to learn more about Algebra I and graduation outcomes among students with similar mathematics proficiency in grade 5 who completed Algebra I in grade 7, 8, or 9 in Virginia. Using data from the Virginia Longitudinal Data System, the study followed a population of 61,200 students who were in Virginia public schools in grade 5 in 2009/10 and who graduated in 2016/17. Results describe students' prior mathematics performance, Algebra I performance, and college preparatory diploma attainment based on the grade level in which they completed Algebra I. The analyses used descriptive statistics and cross-tabulations of the overall study population as well as students identified as economically disadvantaged and English learner students. Fewer than half the students who completed Algebra I in grade 9 earned a college preparatory diploma, even when they earned advanced scores on the grade 5 mathematics assessments. Economically disadvantaged students who scored at the advanced level on the grade 5 mathematics assessment and completed Algebra I in grade 7 had an Algebra I pass rate that was 10 percentage points lower than that of the overall study population, and a rate of earning a college preparatory diploma 18 percentage points lower than that of the overall study population. Similar gaps in performance existed when economically disadvantaged students completed Algebra I in grade 8 or 9.
10/20/2020
WWC 2021001 Success Boston Coaching Intervention Reports
This What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) intervention report summarizes the research on Success Boston Coaching, a coaching intervention for students who are traditionally underrepresented in college to help them transition from high school to college. Students are paired with a dedicated coach starting as early as the spring of their senior year of high school and receive coaching through their first two years in college. As Boston’s citywide college completion initiative, Success Boston partners with existing nonprofit organizations focused on coaching and mentoring to deliver these one-on-one coaching services. Nonprofit coaching partners may also provide students with other direct services such as tutoring and career readiness support, and financial support that includes scholarships, transportation subsidies, and funding for school-related materials and supplies. Based on the research, the WWC found that Success Boston Coaching has potentially positive effects on progressing in college and potentially positive effects on academic achievement for college students.
10/7/2020
REL 2020020 Implementation of Career- and College‑Ready Requirements for High School Graduation in Washington
The Washington State Board of Education recently developed career- and college-ready (CCR) graduation credit requirements that are more aligned with career pathways and with admissions standards at the state’s universities. The requirements took effect for the class graduating in 2019, though some districts implemented them earlier and others received waivers to delay implementation until the class of 2021. Local and state education leaders in Washington state asked Regional Educational Laboratory Northwest to conduct a study of districts’ progress toward implementing the CCR graduation credit requirements from 2018 to 2019. The study looked at student groups from the class of 2018 that did and did not meet the CCR graduation credit requirements and also examined changes in student outcomes when districts increased fine arts, science, world languages, or total graduation credit requirements in any year between 2012/13 and 2017/18. The study found that the percentage of districts implementing all CCR graduation credit requirements increased from 9 percent in 2018 to 56 percent in 2019. The districts that adopted the new requirements by 2018 tended to have fewer students per teacher in required content areas than districts that did not meet all the requirements. About 27 percent of all 2018 graduates met the CCR graduation credit requirements, with gaps that suggest additional barriers exist for students of color, students eligible for the national school lunch program, current English learner students, and students who have low scores on grade 8 state assessments. Finally, past district-level increases in fine arts, science, world languages, and total graduation credit requirements showed little impact on student academic outcomes.
7/20/2020
WWC 2020001 Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP)
This What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) intervention report summarizes the research on Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP), an intervention for community college students that is designed to remove barriers to college success and completion for students seeking associate degrees. ASAP offers students financial, academic, and personal supports. Based on the research, the WWC found that ASAP will likely increase graduation, enrollment, and credit accumulation and persistence rates for community college students.
11/5/2019
NCEE 20194002 Study of Enhanced College Advising in Upward Bound: Impacts on Steps Toward College
The U.S. Department of Education tested a set of promising, low-cost advising strategies, called Find the Fit, designed to help low-income and "first generation" students enrolled in the Department's Upward Bound program choose more selective colleges and stay in until they complete a degree. About 200 Upward Bound projects with 4,500 seniors agreed to participate. The projects were randomly assigned to receive Find the Fit to supplement their regular college advising (treatment group) or to offer their regular advising (control group). This first of three reports looks at Find the Fit's effects on students' steps toward enrolling in a more selective college. The study found that the enhanced advising increased the number and selectivity of colleges to which students applied.
10/18/2018
NCES 2017013 College Applications by 2009 High School Freshmen: Differences by Race/Ethnicity
This report uses data from the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09) 2013 Update collection to look at college applications by high school freshmen four years later.
8/31/2017
REL 2017242 Stated Briefly: Impacts of Ramp-Up to Readiness™ after one year of implementation
This "Stated Briefly" report is a companion piece that summarizes the findings from another report (REL 2017-241). This study examined whether the Ramp-Up to Readiness program (Ramp-Up) produced impacts on high school students' college enrollment actions and personal college readiness following one year of program implementation. The study also looked at Ramp-Up’s impact on more immediate outcomes, such as the emphasis placed on college readiness and the amount of college-related teacher-student interactions taking place in high schools. The impacts were studied in context by assessing the degree to which schools were implementing Ramp-Up to the developer's satisfaction. Forty-nine Minnesota and Wisconsin high schools were randomly assigned to one of two groups: (1) the Ramp-Up group that would implement the program during the 2014-15 school year (25 schools), or (2) the comparison group that would implement Ramp-Up the following school year, 2015-16 (24 schools). The researchers collected data from students and school staff during the fall of 2014, before program implementation and during the spring of 2015 after one year of implementation. The study team administered surveys to staff, surveys to students in grades 10-12, and the commitment to college and goal striving scales from ACT's ENGAGE instrument. Researchers also obtained extant student-level data from the high schools and school-level data from their respective state education agencies. The outcomes of most interest were students' submission of the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and their scores on the two ENGAGE scales. Data indicated that following a single year of implementation, Ramp-Up had no impact on grade 12 students' submission rates for the FAFSA or on the commitment to college and goal striving of students in grades 10-12. However, the program did produce greater emphasis on college-readiness and more student-teacher interactions related to college. Implementation data showed mixed results: on average, Ramp-Up schools implemented the program with adequate fidelity, but some schools struggled with implementation and 88 percent of schools did not adequately implement the planning tools component of the program. Schools implementing Ramp-Up demonstrated a greater emphasis on college-readiness than comparison schools, but a single year of program exposure is insufficient to produce greater college readiness among students or FAFSA submissions among grade 12 students. Schools that adopt Ramp-Up can implement the program as intended by the program developer, but some program components are more challenging to implement than others.
3/7/2017
REL 2017241 Impacts of Ramp-Up to Readiness™ after one year of implementation
This study examined whether the Ramp-Up to Readiness program (Ramp-Up) produced impacts on high school students' college enrollment actions and personal college readiness following one year of program implementation. The study also looked at Ramp-Up's impact on more immediate outcomes, such as the emphasis placed on college readiness and the amount of college-related teacher-student interactions taking place in high schools. The impacts were studied in context by assessing the degree to which schools were implementing Ramp-Up to the developer's satisfaction. Forty-nine Minnesota and Wisconsin high schools were randomly assigned to one of two groups: (1) the Ramp-Up group that would implement the program during the 2014–15 school year (25 schools), or (2) the comparison group that would implement Ramp-Up the following school year, 2015–16 (24 schools). The researchers collected data from students and school staff during the fall of 2014, before program implementation and during the spring of 2015 after one year of implementation. The study team administered surveys to staff, surveys to students in grades 10–12, and the commitment to college and goal striving scales from ACT's ENGAGE instrument. Researchers also obtained extant student-level data from the high schools and school-level data from their respective state education agencies. The outcomes of most interest were students' submission of the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and their scores on the two ENGAGE scales. Data indicated that following a single year of implementation, Ramp-Up had no impact on grade 12 students' submission rates for the FAFSA or on the commitment to college and goal striving of students in grades 10–12. However, the program did produce greater emphasis on college-readiness and more student-teacher interactions related to college. Implementation data showed mixed results: on average, Ramp-Up schools implemented the program with adequate fidelity, but some schools struggled with implementation and 88 percent of schools did not adequately implement the planning tools component of the program. Schools implementing Ramp-Up demonstrated a greater emphasis on college-readiness than comparison schools, but a single year of program exposure is insufficient to produce greater college readiness among students or FAFSA submissions among grade 12 students. Schools that adopt Ramp-Up can implement the program as intended by the program developer, but some program components are more challenging to implement than others. Additional studies need to examine Ramp-Up's impact on students' college enrollment actions, their college admission rates, and their success in college following multiple years of program exposure. Studies also should investigate whether implementation gets stronger in subsequent years as schools gain more experience with Ramp-Up's curriculum and processes.
3/2/2017
REL 2017229 College and career readiness profiles of high school graduates in American Samoa and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands
Stakeholders in American Samoa and the Northern Mariana Islands have identified the college and career readiness of high school graduates as a key concern; however, it has been unclear what data were available to determine student readiness for college and careers. This report examines the availability of college and career readiness indicators; how many of the Data Quality Campaign's 10 Essential Elements of high quality data systems were in place; and the college and career readiness of a graduating class within each jurisdiction. In American Samoa, the study found that data were available to construct five college and career readiness indicators and that six of the Data Quality Campaign's 10 Essential Elements were in place. In addition, the study found that, among the 843 high school completers in the American Samoa sample, students’ mean grade point average was 2.84, fewer than 50 percent took a math class beyond Algebra II, and most students scored at the below basic proficiency level on the SAT-10 reading and math exams. In the Northern Mariana Islands, data were available to construct six college and career readiness indicators, and three of the Data Quality Campaign's 10 Essential Elements were in place. Among the 587 high school completers in the Northern Mariana Islands sample, students' mean grade point average was 2.81, few students completed pre-calculus or calculus, and most students scored at the average proficiency level on the SAT-10 reading and math exams.
2/28/2017
REL 2017231 What are the college outcomes after six years for Tennessee's high school class of 2007?
Regional Educational Laboratory Appalachia and the Tennessee Higher Education Commission (THEC) collaborated to conduct this study, which examines college enrollment, persistence, and performance for Tennessee's public high school class of 2007 six years after high school graduation. The study used student-level data from the Tennessee Department of Education to define the graduating cohort of 2007 and to describe students' demographic characteristics. These data were linked with postsecondary data from THEC and the National Student Clearinghouse (NSC). The NSC provided enrollment and degree-completion data for students enrolled in a public postsecondary institution, and THEC provided data on credits earned and grade point averages (GPA) for students enrolled in a Tennessee public postsecondary institution. Neither source provided data on private institutions, and NSC does not collect credit or GPA data. The study found that just over half of Tennessee's public high school class of 2007 enrolled in a public postsecondary institution within six years. Enrollment rates were highest for Asian or Pacific Islander students (62 percent), followed by White students (57 percent), Black students (52 percent) and Hispanic students (37 percent). Female students also enrolled at higher rates (60 percent) than male students (50 percent). Enrollment rates were highest in the fall immediately after high school (69 percent of those who enrolled within six years). About 16 percent of all graduates completed a four-year degree within six years. The completion rate was higher (37 percent) for students who enrolled immediately after high school. After one year, students enrolled full-time in a four-year institution earned more credits and had higher grade point averages than those in a two-year institution. Results highlight the higher success rates for students who enroll in postsecondary education full-time immediately after high school. The study also points to important subgroup differences—for example, low enrollment and completion rates among Black and Hispanic students. Additional study may reveal both why these differences exist and how they can be mitigated. Policymakers may consider replicating this approach for future cohorts of high school graduates reporting long-term outcomes back to individual districts and schools where local decision-makers can take action.
2/8/2017
REL 2017211 Participation in Kentucky's college preparatory transition courses: An update
Kentucky offers college preparatory transition courses in mathematics, reading, and English to grade 12 students. These courses are designed as one possible intervention for students who have not met Kentucky's college readiness benchmarks on the ACT in grade 11. This study uses descriptive statistics to update previous REL Appalachia research about participation in these courses for the 2014/15 school year. Data are disaggregated by student and school characteristics. In 2014/15, the approximately half of grade 12 students needed an intervention to prepare them for college in mathematics (53 percent), reading (50 percent), or English (40 percent). Nearly two-thirds of Kentucky high schools offered transition courses as an intervention option, and such courses were more common in small, rural, and low-performing high schools. Statewide, more than twice as many students enrolled in mathematics transition courses than in English language arts transition courses (22 and 10 percent, respectively). Of students who had not met college readiness benchmarks, approximately 40 percent participated in mathematics transition courses and approximately 20 percent participated in English language arts transition courses. Some additional students who had already met state benchmarks also participated in the courses.
1/4/2017
WWC PQ1123 Strategies for Postsecondary Students in Developmental Education-A Practice Guide for College and University Administrators, Advisors, and Faculty
Students academically underprepared for college need comprehensive, integrated, and long-lasting supports to be successful in persisting and completing their college degrees. This What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) practice guide, Strategies for Postsecondary Students in Developmental Education – A Practice Guide for College and University Administrators, Advisors, and Faculty, includes evidence-based recommendations that college and university administrators, advisors, and faculty can use to improve the success of students placed into, or at-risk of placement into developmental education. Developed by a panel of experts, the strategies in this guide focus on ways to improve students' progress through developmental education, credit accumulation and persistence, academic achievement, and degree attainment. The practice guide offers specific examples and suggestions for implementing the recommendations in colleges and universities, highlights obstacles to implementation that educators might face, and identifies suggested implementation approaches.
11/29/2016
REL 2017203 Investigating Developmental and college-level course enrollment and passing before and after Florida's developmental education reform
Beginning with 2014 fall semester, developmental education in Florida was made optional for most students. This report compares enrollment and passing rates in developmental reading, writing, and mathematics courses as well as gateway English and mathematics courses for a cohort of first-time-in-college students in fall 2014 to three cohorts of students in the fall semesters prior to 2014. Compared to prior semesters, once developmental education became optional fewer students enrolled in developmental education courses. Passing rates for developmental education courses in reading, writing, and math increased an average of 2.0 percentage points over fall 2013. More students enrolled in gateway (entry-level, college-credit bearing) courses. Gateway course passing rates declined compared to previous years, with the largest declines occurring in intermediate algebra. The proportion of the first-time-in-college fall cohort students passing a gateway course increased compared to previous years.
10/26/2016
WWC IRTP664 ACT/SAT Test Preparation and Coaching Programs Transition to College
ACT and SAT test preparation and coaching programs are designed to increase students' scores on college entrance exams. These programs familiarize students with the format of the test, introduce test-taking strategies, and provide practice with the types of problems that may be included on the tests. The WWC reviewed the research on ACT and SAT test preparation and coaching programs and found that they have positive effects on general academic achievement for high school students.
10/4/2016
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