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 Pub Number  Title  Date
NCES 2019140 Characteristics of Public and Private Elementary and Secondary Schools in the United States: Results From the 2017–18 National Teacher and Principal Survey First Look
This First Look report provides descriptive statistics and basic information from the 2017–18 National Teacher and Principal Survey Public School and Private School Data files.
8/13/2019
NCEE 20194006 Evaluation of the DC Opportunity Scholarship Program: Impacts After Three Years
The DC Opportunity Scholarship Program (OSP), established in 2004, is the only federally-funded private school voucher program for low-income parents in the United States. This report examines impacts on achievement and other outcomes three years after eligible students were selected or not selected to receive scholarships using a lottery process in 2012, 2013, and 2014. The report found that the OSP had no effect on either math or reading achievement. The OSP did have positive effects on students' – but not parents' – satisfaction with their schools and perceptions of school safety.
5/15/2019
NCEE 20194005 Do Charter Middle Schools Improve Students' College Outcomes?
A study from the National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance (NCEE) obtained college enrollment and completion data for students who — more than a decade ago — entered lotteries to be admitted to 31 charter middle schools across the United States. College outcomes were compared for 1,723 randomly selected "lottery winners" and 1,150 randomly selected "lottery losers". The study found that being admitted to a charter middle school did not affect college outcomes. Also, there was not a consistent relationship between a charter school's impact on middle school achievement and the school's impact on college outcomes.
4/25/2019
NCES 2019052 Documentation to the 2016-17 Common Core of Data (CCD) Universe Files (2019-052)
These data files provide new data for the universe of public elementary and secondary schools and agencies in the United States in school year 2016–17.
1/16/2019
NCEE 20184010 Evaluation of the DC Opportunity Scholarship Program: Impacts After Two Years
The DC Opportunity Scholarship Program (OSP), established in 2004, is the only federally-funded private school voucher program for low-income parents in the United States. This report examines impacts on achievement and other outcomes two years after eligible children were selected or not selected to receive scholarships using a lottery process in 2012, 2013, and 2014. The report found negative impacts on math achievement but positive impacts on parent and student perceptions of school safety, for those participating in the program. There were no statistically significant effects on parents' or students' general satisfaction with their schools or parent involvement in education.
5/31/2018
NCES 2018063 Services to Support Parent Involvement by Community Type, Sector, and School Classification
This report describes the availability of services to support parent involvement.
4/24/2018
WWC IRCS687 Harlem Children's Zone (HCZ) Promise Academy Charter Schools
This What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) report summarizes the research on Harlem Children’s Zone (HCZ) Promise Academy Charter Schools is a non-profit organization designed to serve low-income children and families living in Harlem in New York City. The HCZ Promise Academy Charter Schools have a longer school day and year than traditional public schools, monitor student progress on academic outcomes, provide differentiated instruction, and educate students and families on character development, healthy lifestyles, and leadership skills. After reviewing the current research, the WWC found that no eligible studies meet WWC design standards. Therefore, more research is needed to determine the program's impacts on elementary, middle, and high school students.
1/24/2018
WWC IRCS686 Green Dot Public Schools
This What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) report summarizes the research on Green Dot Public Schools, a nonprofit organization that operates more than 20 public charter middle and high schools in California, Tennessee, and Washington. The program emphasizes high quality teaching, strong school leadership, a curriculum that prepares students for college, and partnerships with the community. Based on the research, Green Dot Public Schools had potentially positive effects on mathematics achievement, English language arts achievement, student progression, and school attendance for high school students.
1/24/2018
WWC IESS688 Knowledge is Power Program (KIPP)
This What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) report summarizes the research on the Knowledge Is Power Program (KIPP), a nonprofit network of more than 200 public charter schools educating early childhood, elementary, middle, and high school students. Students, parents, and teachers must sign a commitment to abide by a set of responsibilities, including high behavioral and disciplinary expectations. KIPP schools have an extended school day and an extended school year compared with traditional public schools. Based on the research, the WWC found KIPP to have positive effects on mathematics and English language arts achievement and potentially positive effects on science and social studies achievement for middle and high school students. KIPP shows no discernible effects on student progression for high school students.
1/24/2018
REL 2018288 Special education enrollment and classification in Louisiana charter schools and traditional schools
This study is an exploratory analysis of the enrollment rates of students with individualized education programs (IEPs) in the charter school and traditional school sectors. It also examines factors associated with variation in classification and enrollment rates of students with IEPs across these school sectors in the four educational regions of Louisiana with three or more charter schools. Those areas are Region 1, which includes New Orleans; Region 3, which includes Jefferson and five other parishes near New Orleans; Region 5, which includes Ouachita and five surrounding parishes in the northeast corner of the state; and Region 8, which includes Baton Rouge. In the 2013/14 school year, 77 percent of charter students in Louisiana attended school in one of these four regions.

The study found that the enrollment rate of students with IEPs was lower in public charter schools than traditional public schools in the four Louisiana educational regions in the study from 2010/11 through 2013/14. This gap, however, declined from 2.5 percentage points in 2010/11 to 0.5 percentage points in 2013/14. For three of the four study years the gap was largest in schools serving grades K–5, and for all four study years it was smallest in schools serving grades 9–12. In 2013/14 the special education enrollment rate was higher for charter schools than traditional schools at the high school level (a 2.0 percentage point difference). The gap varied by disability type, as enrollments were higher in charter schools for students with emotional disturbance but higher in traditional schools for students with most other disabilities. Charter school enrollment was not clearly associated with the likelihood of being newly classified as requiring an IEP. However, charter school enrollment was associated with an increased likelihood of being declassified as requiring an IEP, though less than 1 percent of students with an IEP in both charter schools and traditional schools were declassified over the study period. The gap in the declassification rate of 0.04 percentage points favoring charter school declassifications over the four years of the study was too small to explain the 2 percentage point reduction in the charter school special education enrollment gap.

The exploratory results signal that, by the 2013/14 school year, charter schools in Louisiana were serving students with IEPs in the high school grades at rates similar to or higher than traditional schools in the state. The findings suggest that public charter schools are less successful at attracting and enrolling students with IEPs into their schools in the early elementary grades. Finally, these findings confirm those of prior studies that charter schools declassify students as no longer requiring special education services at higher rates than do traditional schools, but those rates of declassification remain less than 1 percent over a four-year period.
1/23/2018
REL 2018287 An exploratory analysis of features of New Orleans charter schools associated with student achievement growth
In the wake of Hurricane Katrina, the number of charter schools in New Orleans has rapidly expanded. During the 2012/13 school year—the period covered by this study, of the 85 public schools in New Orleans, 75 were chartered, enrolling more than 84 percent of all public school students in the city in 92 different school campuses. This study explored organizational, operational, and instructional features of New Orleans charter schools serving grades 3–8 that are potential indicators of student achievement growth in English language arts (ELA), math, and science. The organizational characteristic of kindergarten provided as an entry grade was associated with higher levels of VAM on the ELA test. The operational characteristic of an extended school year also was associated with higher levels of ELA VAM. The instructional characteristics of a lower percentage of teachers with graduate degrees, more experienced teachers, and a lower student/teacher ratio were associated with higher levels of ELA VAM. The analysis revealed fewer potential key indicators of charter school effectiveness regarding VAM in math and science. The inclusion of kindergarten as an entry grade was the only school feature that was statistically significant in its association with math VAM; schools with kindergarten were correlated with higher math VAM scores. Having a lower student/teacher ratio and fewer staff in student support roles were the only school features that were statistically significant in their association with higher science VAM scores. None of these associations between potential key indicators and math and science VAM scores remained statistically significant when estimated using 2013/14 outcome data, indicating that the results are not robust to such an additional analysis. Offering kindergarten as an entry grade and having a lower teacher/student ratio were the only potential key indicators with statistically significant associations with more than one VAM outcome. Having kindergarten as an entry grade was positively associated with ELA and math VAM. Having a lower teacher/student ratio was associated with higher ELA and science VAM.
1/3/2018
NCES 2017071 Characteristics of Public Elementary and Secondary Schools in the United States: Results From the 2015–16 National Teacher and Principal Survey
This First Look report provides descriptive statistics and basic information from the 2015–16 National Teacher and Principal Survey Public School Data File.
8/22/2017
NCEE 20174022 Evaluation of the DC Opportunity Scholarship Program: Impacts After One Year
The DC Opportunity Scholarship Program (OSP), established in 2004, is the only federally-funded private school voucher program for low-income parents in the United States. This report examines impacts on achievement and other outcomes one year after eligible children were selected or not selected to receive scholarships using a lottery process in 2012, 2013, and 2014. The study found negative impacts on student achievement but positive impacts on parent perceptions of school safety, for those participating in the program. There were no statistically significant effects on parents' or students' general satisfaction with their schools or parent involvement in education.
4/27/2017
REL 2017236 Identifying South Carolina charter schools that are "beating the odds"
The purpose of this report was to determine which South Carolina charter schools performed better than could be predicted, considering demographic and socioeconomic characteristics. This study identified South Carolina charter schools as "beating the odds" when they outperform their predicted level of performance on standardized tests given school demographics using a hierarchical linear model approach. Results indicate that for grades 3–5 13 schools beat the odds in English language arts and 14 schools beat the odds in mathematics. For grades 6–8, 12 schools beat the odds in English language arts and nine schools beat the odds in mathematics.
2/1/2017
REL 2017188 Leadership characteristics and practices in South Carolina charter schools
The purpose of this descriptive study was to identify characteristics of charter school leaders in South Carolina, determine how they spend their work hours, understand the time they spend on challenges to their work, and learn who influences their schools' policies. REL Southeast researchers collaborated with the South Carolina Department of Education (SCDE) and other charter school policymakers and practitioners to develop a survey based on items from the school and principal questionnaires of the U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics Schools and Staffing Survey. SCDE administered the survey to the 66 leaders in charter schools across the state operating during the 2014/15 school year. Forty leaders provided responses. Results indicate that the leaders have many similar demographic, educational, and employment characteristics and reasons for becoming charter school leaders. They worked an average almost 60 hours per week, spending more hours on activities related to communication with families and on school regulations and policies than on other tasks. Many of them spent time daily on school safety. A majority of the leaders were frequently challenged by state education agency requirements and services and sponsor intervention, but leaders were rarely or never challenged by staffing issues or board intervention. In addition, the leaders reported having more influence than any other entity over most of their schools' policies, except policies related to classroom instruction, academic guidance, athletics, and student assessment, which their staff influenced more and board membership policies that their board influenced more. This study was a first step toward understanding what characteristics and activities of charter school leaders in South Carolina may lead to improved school performance. Further research is needed to link school leadership characteristics and time management practices to school and student performance and other outcomes.
11/8/2016
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