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 Pub Number  Title  Date
WWC QRMAA0327 WWC Quick Review of the Report "Access to Algebra I: The Effects of Online Mathematics for Grade 8 Students"
Among the students identified by school staff as eligible for the program, those attending schools that offered the online Algebra I course scored higher on the assessment of algebra skills than those attending schools without the program. The estimated effect size of 0.41 is roughly equivalent to moving a student from the 50th to the 66th percentile in algebra achievement. No statistically significant difference existed between the two groups in nonalgebra, general mathematics achievement.
3/27/2012
REL 20124021 Access to Algebra I: The Effects of Online Mathematics for Grade 8 Students
This report presents findings from a randomized control trial designed to inform the decisions of policymakers who are considering using online courses to provide access to Algebra I in grade 8. It focuses on students judged by their schools to be ready to take Algebra I in grade 8 but who attend schools that do not offer the course. The study tested the impact of offering an online Algebra I course on students' algebra achievement at the end of grade 8 and their subsequent likelihood of participating in an advanced mathematics course sequence in high school. The study was designed to respond to both broad public interest in the deployment of online courses for K–12 students and to calls from policymakers to provide students with adequate pathways to advanced coursetaking sequences in mathematics (National Mathematics Advisory Panel 2008).
12/13/2011
NCES 2012009 Public-Use Data Files and Documentation (FRSS 98): Distance Education Courses for Public Elementary and Secondary School Students: 2009–10
This file contains data from a fast-response survey titled "Distance Education Courses for Public Elementary and Secondary Students: 2009-10." This survey provides national estimates on distance education courses in public school districts, including enrollment in distance education courses, how districts monitor these courses, the motivations for providing distance education, and the technologies used for delivering distance education. NCES released the results of this survey in the First Look report “Distance Education Courses for Public Elementary and Secondary School Students: 2009–10” (NCES 2012-008).

Questionnaires and cover letters were mailed to the superintendent of each sampled school district in November 2010. The letter stated the purpose of the study and asked that the definition of distance education be reviewed to determine who in the district would be best suited to provide the requested information. Respondents were offered the option of completing the survey via the web or by mail. Telephone follow-up for survey nonresponse and data clarification was initiated in late November 2010 and completed in March 2011. The weighted response rate was 95 percent.

The survey asked respondents to report information on the number of distance education enrollments in their district. Respondents reported on whether the district tracked distance education course completions and if students enrolled in regular high school programs could take a full course load using only distance education courses. Data on the entities that developed and delivered distance education courses were also collected. Other survey topics included the types of distance education courses taken by students, whether the district plans to expand the number of distance education courses, and the technologies used for delivering distance education.
12/1/2011
NCES 2012008 Distance Education Courses for Public Elementary and Secondary School Students: 2009–10
This report provides national estimates about distance education courses in public school districts. The estimates presented in this report are based on a district survey about distance education courses offered by the district or by any of the schools in the district during the 2009-10 school year.
11/29/2011
NCES 2012154 Learning at a Distance: Undergraduate Enrollment in Distance Education Courses and Degree Programs
This Statistics in Brief investigates undergraduates’ participation in distance education using nationally representative student-reported data collected through the three most recent administrations of the National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS:2000, NPSAS:04, and NPSAS:08).
10/5/2011
NCES 2009044 Distance Education at Degree-Granting Postsecondary Institutions: 2006-07
This report presents findings from "Distance Education at Postsecondary Institutions: 2006-07", a survey that was designed to provide national estimates on distance education at 2-year and 4-year Title IV eligible, degree-granting institutions. Distance education was defined as a formal education process in which the student and instructor are not in the same place. Thus, instruction may be synchronous or asynchronous, and it may involve communication through the use of video, audio, or computer technologies, or by correspondence (which may include both written correspondence and the use of technology such as CD-ROM). The questionnaire instructed institutions to include distance education courses and programs that were formally designated as online, hybrid/blended online, and other distance education courses and programs. Hybrid/blended online courses were defined as a combination of online and in-class instruction with reduced in-class seat time for students.

The 2006-07 study on distance education collected information on the prevalence, types, delivery, policies, and acquisition or development of distance education courses and programs. Findings indicate that during the 2006-07 academic year, two-thirds (66 percent) of 2-year and 4-year Title IV degree-granting postsecondary institutions reported offering online, hybrid/blended online, or other distance education courses for any level or audience. Sixty-five percent of the institutions reported college-level credit-granting distance education courses, and 23 percent of the institutions reported noncredit distance education courses. Sixty-one percent of 2-year and 4-year institutions reported offering online courses, 35 percent reported hybrid/blended courses, and 26 percent reported other types of college-level credit-granting distance education courses. Together, distance education courses accounted for an estimated 12.2 million enrollments (or registrations). Asynchronous (not simultaneous or real-time) Internet-based technologies were cited as the most widely used technology for the instructional delivery of distance education courses; they were used to a large extent in 75 percent and to a moderate extent in 17 percent of the institutions that offered college-level credit-granting distance education courses. The most common factors cited as affecting distance education decisions to a major extent were meeting student demand for flexible schedules, providing access to college for students who would otherwise not have access, making more courses available, and seeking to increase student enrollment.
12/30/2008
NCES 2008008 Technology-Based Distance Education Courses for Public Elementary and Secondary School Students: 2002–03 and 2004–05
This report details findings from "Technology-Based Distance Education Courses for Public Elementary and Secondary School Students: 2004-05," a survey that was designed to provide policymakers, researchers, and educators with information about technology-based distance education courses in public elementary and secondary schools nationwide. This report also compares these findings with baseline data collected in 2002-03, and provides longitudinal analysis of change in the districts that responded to both the 2002-03 and 2004-05 surveys. For these two surveys, distance education courses were defined as credit-granting courses offered via audio, video, or Internet or other computer technologies to elementary and secondary school students enrolled in the district, in which the teacher and students were in different locations. Findings indicate that 37 percent of public school districts and 10 percent of all public schools nationwide had students enrolled in technology-based distance education courses during 2004-05. During 2002-03, 36 percent of districts and 9 percent of schools had students enrolled in technology-based distance education courses. About a quarter (26 percent) of school districts that existed in both 2002-03 and 2004-05 had students enrolled in technology-based distance education in both school years, 11 percent did not have students in this type of education in 2002-03 but had such enrollments in 2004-05, and an equal percentage of districts (11 percent) had students enrolled in technology-based distance education in 2002-03 but not in 2004-05. The number of enrollments in technology-based distance education courses increased from an estimated 317,070 enrollments in 2002-03 to 506,950 in 2004-05. The number of enrollments varied considerably among districts, although the majority of districts (57 percent) reported between one and 20 technology-based distance education enrollments in 2004-05. Distance education was more commonly offered by high schools than by schools at any other level, with 61 percent of technology-based distance education enrollments at the high school level. Seventy-one percent of districts with students enrolled in technology-based distance education courses in 2004-05 planned to expand their distance education courses in the future.
6/27/2008
NCES 2007028 Public-Use Data Files and Documentation: Distance Education Courses for Public Elementary and Secondary School Students: 2002-03
This file contains data from a fast-response survey conducted in winter-spring 2003-04 titled “Distance Education Courses for Public Elementary and Secondary School Students: 2002-03.” This public school district survey was the first nationally representative study to examine technology-based distance education availability, course offerings, and enrollments in the nation’s public elementary and secondary schools. For this study, distance education courses were defined as credit-granting courses offered to elementary and secondary school students enrolled in the district in which the teacher and students were in different locations. NCES released the results of the survey in the publication “Distance Education Courses for Public Elementary and Secondary School Students: 2002-03.” Questionnaires and cover letters for the study were mailed to the superintendent of each sampled district in November 2003, requesting that the questionnaire be completed by the district’s director of curriculum and instruction, the technology coordinator, the distance education coordinator, or another staff member who was most knowledgeable about the district’s distance education courses. Respondents were also offered the option of completing the survey via the Web. Telephone follow-up for survey nonresponse and data clarification was initiated in December 2003 and completed in April 2004. The final response rate was 94 percent. The survey asked whether there were any public elementary or secondary school students in the district enrolled in distance education courses. If the respondents indicated that there were public elementary or secondary school students in the district enrolled in distance education courses, they were asked to report the number of schools in their district with students enrolled in distance education courses by instructional level of the school. Respondents were also asked to report the number of distance education course enrollments in schools in their district by instructional level of the school and curriculum area. Other survey items asked which technologies were used as primary modes of instructional delivery for distance education courses, which entities delivered distance education courses, whether any students accessed online distance education courses (and if so, from which locations), and the district’s reasons for having distance education courses. Finally, respondents were asked whether their district had any plans to expand their distance education courses, and if so, which factors, if any, might be keeping them from expanding those courses.
4/4/2007
NFES 2006803 Forum Guide to Elementary/Secondary Virtual Education
This guide provides recommendations for collecting accurate, comparable, and useful data about virtual education in an elementary/secondary education setting.
6/29/2006
NCES 2005118 Distance Education at Higher Education Institutions: 2000-01 (PEQIS 13): Public-Use Data Files and Documentation.
This file contains data from a 2000–2001 quick-response survey, "Distance Education at Higher Education Institutions: 2000-01" (PEQIS 13). The administrators who were most knowledgeable about their institutions’ technology and distance-education programs completed the survey. Questions covered the number of distance education courses, distance education enrollments and course offerings, degree and certificate programs, distance education technologies, participation in distance education consortia, accommodations for students with disabilities, distance education program goals, and factors institutions identify as keeping them from starting or expanding distance education offerings. For this study, distance education was defined as education or training courses delivered to remote (off-campus) sites via audio, video (live or prerecorded), or computer technologies, including both synchronous (i.e., simultaneous) and asynchronous (i.e., not simultaneous) instruction.
8/22/2005
NCES 2005009 Dual Credit and Exam-Based Courses in U.S. Public High Schools: 2002-03
This public school survey is the first national survey to provide baseline data on dual credit and exam-based courses, including Advanced Placement (AP) and International Baccalaureate (IB) courses, for public high school students. The report provides national estimates of the number of public high schools that offered dual credit and/or exam-based courses, as well as the number of enrollments in those courses. In addition, it examines the location and educational focus of these courses, dual credit course characteristics, and school requirements surrounding dual credit courses. Survey findings are presented at the national level and by school characteristics such as enrollment size, school locale, region, and percent minority enrollment.
4/6/2005
NCES 2005010 Distance Education Courses for Public Elementary and Secondary School Students: 2002-03
This public school district survey is the first national survey to explore distance education courses for public elementary and secondary school students. The report provides national estimates of the number of districts and schools with students enrolled in distance education courses, as well as the number of enrollments in those courses. In addition, it examines the reported reasons for having distance education courses, the instructional level of the populations served, entities delivering the courses to students, and data pertaining to online courses. Data about curriculum areas and technology in distance education courses are also discussed. Survey findings are presented at the national level and by school district characteristics such as metropolitan status, district enrollment size, region, and poverty concentration.
3/2/2005
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