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Search Results: (16-30 of 42 records)

 Pub Number  Title  Date
WWC IRSLDPR10 Project Read Phonology
Project Read is a multisensory language arts curriculum designed for use in a classroom or group setting. Two main objectives of the program are to use language in all its forms, and to use responsive instruction rather than preplanned textbook lessons. The program emphasizes direct instruction, and lessons move from letter-sounds to words, sentences, and stories. The What Works Clearinghouse review of the effectiveness research on Project Read identified one study that falls within the scope of the Students with Learning Disabilities review protocol that meets WWC evidence standards, and presents sufficient outcome data to allow the WWC to make a determination of the effectiveness of Project Read® Phonology. The study included 66 students with learning disabilities in kindergarten through grade 4 from five school districts. The Clearinghouse review found Project Read Phonology to have no discernible effects on general reading achievement for students with learning disabilities.
7/1/2010
WWC IRSLDHM10 Herman Method
The Herman Method teaches reading in small groups of up to three students. The curriculum provides instruction in phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and reading comprehension, while also teaching spelling and writing. The What Works Clearinghouse review of the research on the Herman Method for students with disabilities identified four studies that were published or released between 1989 and 2009. No studies that fall within the scope of the Students with Learning Disabilities review protocol meet WWC evidence standards. The lack of studies meeting WWC evidence standards means that, at this time, the WWC is unable to draw any conclusions based on research about the effectiveness or ineffectiveness of the Herman Method for students with learning disabilities.
7/1/2010
WWC IRSLDBR10 Barton Reading & Spelling System
The Barton Reading & Spelling System is a one-to-one tutoring system designed to improve the reading, writing, and spelling skills of children, teenagers, or adults who struggle due to dyslexia or another learning disability. The program is divided into ten levels, each with 10 to 15 lessons that cover the methods and sequence of teaching reading, spelling, and writing. The What Works Clearinghouse review of the research on the Barton Reading & Spelling System for students with disabilities identified 13 studies that were published or released between 1989 and 2009. No studies that fall within the scope of the Students with Learning Disabilities review protocol meet WWC evidence standards. The lack of studies meeting WWC evidence standards means that, at this time, the WWC is unable to draw any conclusions based on research about the effectiveness or ineffectiveness of the Barton Reading & Spelling System for students with learning disabilities.
7/1/2010
WWC IRECEDR10 Dialogic Reading
The first What Works Clearinghouse release in the new topic area of Early Childhood Education Interventions for Children with Disabilities is an intervention report on Dialogic Reading an interactive shared picture-book reading practice designed to enhance young children's language and literacy skills. The Clearinghouse review of the research identified two studies that meet WWC evidence standards. The two studies included 52 students with language delays, from ages three to six, participating in early childhood programs in the Pacific Northwest. Dialogic Reading was found to have potentially positive effects on communication and language competencies for children with disabilities.
4/27/2010
WWC IRLDLI09 Intervention Report: Lindamood Phoneme Sequencing (LiPS)
This What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report assesses existing research on the Lindamood Phoneme Sequencing (LiPS) program that is designed to teach students the skills they need to decode words and to identify individual sounds and blends in words. The Clearinghouse reviewed 31 studies that investigated the effects of LiPS on students with learning disabilities. One study that falls within the scope of the Students with Learning Disabilities review protocol meets What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) evidence standards. The study included 50 students with learning disabilities from eight to ten years of age in three elementary schools in Florida. Based on this one study, the WWC considers the extent of evidence for LiPS on students with learning disabilities to be small for alphabetic, reading fluency, reading comprehension, writing, and math. The Clearinghouse’s assessment of this research found LiPS to have potentially positive effects on alphabetics, reading fluency, and math, no discernible effects on reading comprehension, and potentially negative effects on writing for students with learning disabilities.
3/16/2010
REL 2010086 A Systematic Comparison of the American Diploma Project College Readiness Standards with those of the ACT, College Board, and Standards For Success
This study of four national English language arts standards compares the content of three sets of standards with a benchmark set, the American Diploma Project (ADP), to see how closely the sets agree on what students should know in English language arts to prepare for college. The match between each of the three comparison sets and the 62 content statements in the ADP benchmark varies, from 77 percent of the statements for the College Board College Readiness Standards and 68 percent for Standards for Success to 34 percent for the ACT College Readiness Standards. But only 5 percent of the ADP statements fully match the content in all three comparison sets--27 percent when partial matching is also considered.
3/1/2010
WWC IREEHE09 Headsprout Early Reading
Headsprout Early Reading is an internet-based supplemental early literacy curriculum consisting of forty 20-minute animated episodes that are designed to teach phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension. The Clearinghouse's review of the research on the effectiveness of Headsprout Early Reading found this literacy curriculum to have potentially positive effects on oral language and print knowledge.
10/27/2009
WWC 20094045 Assisting Students Struggling with Reading: Response to Intervention (RtI) and Multi-Tier Intervention in the Primary Grades
This guide offers five specific recommendations to help educators identify struggling readers and implement evidence-based strategies to promote their reading achievement. Teachers and reading specialists can utilize these strategies to implement RtI and multi-tier intervention methods and frameworks at the classroom or school level. Recommendations cover how to screen students for reading problems, design a multi-tier intervention program, adjust instruction to help struggling readers, and monitor student progress.
2/18/2009
NCES 2009036REV Mathematics Achievement of Language-Minority Students During the Elementary Years
This Issue Brief uses data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998-99 (ECLS-K) to examine the scores of public-school language-minority students on a mathematics assessment in 1st grade, as well as the gain in their scores between 1st and 5th grades. Scores are reported by three background characteristics--student’s race/ethnicity, poverty status, and mother’s education--that have been found to be related to achievement. The findings indicate that language-minority students (English Proficient students and English Language Learners) scored lower on a 1st-grade mathematics assessment than did students whose primary home language was English. Between 1st and 5th grades, there was no measurable difference in gain scores on the mathematics assessment among the three language groups. However, gain score differences within and between the language groups were found by student background characteristics. For example, Asian language-minority students made greater gains than their Hispanic peers.
12/16/2008
REL 2008049 Preparing to Serve English Language Learner Students: School Districts with Emerging English Language Learner Communities
This report aims to help school districts deal with the challenges of newly enrolling or rapidly increasing English language learner students by offering background information and sharing the experiences of districts that have addressed similar challenges in providing services and infrastructure to support the success of English language learner students.
6/19/2008
REL 2007012 Assessing the Likelihood Virginia Public Schools will Meet the Central Goal of No Child Left Behind: Having Every Student Proficient
This report investigates progress in Virginia public schools in satisfying the requirement of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 that every student be proficient in reading and math by 2014. It develops a variable change model that uses observed baseline proficiency and proficiency trends at individual schools to forecast gains for six subgroups in elementary, middle, and high schools.
9/27/2007
REL 2007025 Registering Students from Language Backgrounds Other Than English
This report seeks to alert administrators, school staff, and database managers to variations in the naming systems of other cultures; to help these groups accommodate other cultures and identify students consistently in school databases; and to provide knowledge of other cultures' naming conventions and forms of address to assist in interacting with students and their family members.
9/5/2007
NCES 2007006 Comparative Indicators of Education in the United States and Other G-8 Countries: 2006
This report describes how the education system in the United States compares with education systems in the other G-8 countries--Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the Russian Federation, and the United Kingdom. Twenty indicators are organized in five sections: (1) population and school enrollment; (2) academic performance; (3) context for learning; (4) expenditure for education; and (5) education returns: educational attainment and income.
8/14/2007
WWC IRECLB07 Let's Begin with the Letter People®
Let's Begin with the Letter People® is an early education curriculum that uses thematic units to develop children's language and literacy skills. A major focus is phonological awareness, including rhyming, word play, alliteration, and segmentation. Children are encouraged to learn as individuals, in small groups, and in a whole-class environment. Both cognitive and socio-emotional development are presented as keys to learning.
7/30/2007
WWC IRELSA07 Success for All
Success for All (SFA) is a comprehensive reading, writing, and oral language development program for students in pre-K through eighth grade. Its underlying premise is that all children, including those with limited English proficiency, can and should be reading in English at grade level by the end of third grade. (SFA can impact Spanish literacy as well, though these outcomes fall outside the scope of this report.) Initial reading instruction is delivered in 90-minute daily blocks to students grouped by reading level, across classes and grades. Certified teachers provide daily tutoring to those students who are having difficulty reading. In addition, Family Support Teams and full-time SFA facilitators train teachers, oversee student assessments, encourage parental involvement, work to decrease absenteeism, and assist with decisions about group placement and tutoring.
7/2/2007
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