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 Pub Number  Title  Date
NCES 2017002 Highlights from TIMSS and TIMSS Advanced 2015: Mathematics and Science Achievement of U.S. Students in Grades 4 and 8 and in Advanced Courses at the End of High School in an International Context
The Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) 2015 is the sixth administration of this international comparative study since 1995 when first administered. TIMSS is used to compare over time the mathematics and science knowledge and skills of fourth- and eighth-graders. TIMSS is designed to align broadly with mathematics and science curricula in the participating countries. The results, therefore, suggest the degree to which students have learned mathematics and science concepts and skills likely to have been taught in school. In 2015, TIMSS was administered in 49 IEA member countries and 6 other education systems at grade 4, and in 38 IEA member countries and 6 other education systems at grade 8.

TIMSS Advanced assesses the advanced mathematics and physics knowledge and skills of students at the end of high school who have taken courses in advanced mathematics and physics. TIMSS Advanced 2015 represents only the second administration in which the United States has participated since the first administration in 1995, and is designed to align broadly with the advanced mathematics and physics curricula in the participating countries. The results, therefore, suggest the degree to which students have learned the advanced mathematics and physics concepts and skills likely to have been taught in school. Nine countries participated in TIMSS Advanced 2015.

The focus of the report is on the performance of U.S. students relative to their peers in other countries on TIMSS and TIMSS Advanced 2015, and, for TIMSS results, on changes in achievement since 2011 and 1995. For a number of participating countries and education systems, changes in achievement can be documented over the last 20 years, from 1995 to 2015. This report also describes the characteristics of students who participated in the advanced mathematics and physics assessments at the end of high school, and describes the performance of males and females in these subjects. In addition, it includes achievement in Florida, a U.S. state that participated in TIMSS both as part of the U.S. national sample of public and private schools as well as individually with state-level samples of public schools.

In addition to numerical scale results, TIMSS also includes international benchmarks. The TIMSS international benchmarks provide a way to interpret the scale scores by describing the types of knowledge and skills students demonstrate at different levels along the TIMSS scale.

Additional tables with TIMSS and TIMSS Advanced results will be available on the NCES website at http://nces.ed.gov/timss/timss15.asp.
11/29/2016
REL 2016122 A Review of the Literature to Identify Leading Indicators Related to Hispanic STEM Postsecondary Educational Outcomes
The purpose of this study was to review recent peer-reviewed studies in order to identify malleable factors measured in K–12 settings that are related to students' postsecondary STEM success, particularly for Hispanic students. Postsecondary STEM success was defined as enrollment in, persistence in, and completion of postsecondary STEM majors or degrees. Twenty-three relevant studies were identified, yet only 4 examined K–12 factors predictive of postsecondary STEM success specifically for Hispanic students. The review found that the number of high school mathematics and science courses taken, and the level of those courses is a consistent predictor of postsecondary STEM outcomes for all student subgroups. However, the literature indicates that minority students, including Hispanics, were less likely to take the highest-level mathematics and science courses. Students' interest and confidence in STEM at the K–12 levels was also predictive of postsecondary STEM success. Yet, despite lower levels of postsecondary STEM success, some studies indicate racial/ethnic minority and White students had similar levels of interest and confidence in STEM. The reviewed research suggests that reducing disparities in mathematics and science preparation between Hispanic and White students and increasing the rates at which Hispanic students take high-level mathematics and science classes has promise for informing interventions designed to improve STEM outcomes.
4/19/2016
REL 2015066 Stated Briefly: Gearing up to teach the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics in the rural Northeast Region
This study describes key challenges and necessary supports related to implementation of the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM) identified by rural math educators in the Northeast. The research team interviewed state and district math coordinators and surveyed teachers in Maine, New Hampshire, New York and Vermont, to assess their most pressing challenges and associated needs. Key challenges included time and support for teachers to change their instructional practices to meet the CCSSM, availability of high-quality instructional materials, and opportunities for collaboration. The report was produced in response to input from the Northeast Rural Districts Research Alliance (NRDRA), one of eight research alliances working with REL Northeast & Islands. This “Stated Briefly” report is a companion piece that summarizes the results of another report entitled Gearing up to teach the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics in rural Northeast Region schools, released on November 12, 2014.
12/9/2014
WWC QR2014230 Quick Review of "Conceptualizing Astronomical Scale: Virtual Simulations on Handheld Tablet Computers Reverse Misconceptions"
This study examined how using two different ways of displaying the solar system—a true-to-scale mode vs. an orrery mode--affects students' knowledge of astronomical concepts. Solar system displays were presented in a software application on a handheld tablet computer. In a true-to-scale mode, users navigate a simulated three-dimensional solar system environment using a tablet's pinch-to-zoom touchscreen interface; this provides an accurate representation of sizes and distances of planetary bodies. The study authors reported that student gains in learning astronomical concepts, measured as the differences between pretest and posttest scores, were significantly larger when using the true-to-scale mode than when using an orrery mode.
2/7/2014
NCES 2013041 Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) 2011 U.S. restricted-use datafile
This datafile contains school IDs that can be linked to the public-use U.S. TIMSS 2011 datafile to allow for merging with data from the Common Core of Data (CCD) and Private School Universe Survey (PSS). This datafile can only be obtained by those who apply for a restricted-use license through NCES. Information on how to merge the restricted-use datafile with the U.S. TIMSS 2011 public-use datafile is included.

A User Guide to the data is included in the U.S. TIMSS and PIRLS 2011 Technical Report, which is available online separately (publication number 2013046).
12/31/2013
WWC PG01813 Practice Guide: Teaching Math to Young Children
Before they even enter a classroom, many children show an interest in math. They notice basic shapes, examine patterns, and practice counting. Teachers can build on this curiosity and get children excited about math with five recommendations from the new What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) practice guide, Teaching Math to Young Children.

To succeed in school, children need to develop skills in five critical early math areas: number and operations, geometry, patterns, measurement, and data analysis. These are complex concepts for young minds. With techniques found in the guide, teachers can make math a daily experience that children enjoy and can succeed in.

Recommendations include the following:

  • Help your students take the next developmental step in learning math by building on what they already know. Every classroom has children at different levels of progression, so utilize small-group activities to target different skill levels.
  • To get the most out of your math instruction, continually monitor children’s progress so you can tailor your future lessons to their needs. Gather specific information about each child’s skill level, such as how they perform on new tasks, and watch how they complete each activity.
  • Make math a part of the school day and create a math-rich environment. Use math concepts such as numbers and shapes to label things like classroom rules or lunch tables. This will help children see how math plays a part in everyday activities.
The research base for this guide was identified through a comprehensive search for studies evaluating instructional practices for teaching math to children in preschool, prekindergarten, or kindergarten programs.
11/19/2013
NCES 2014361 High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09) Base Year to First Follow-Up Data File Documentation
This manual has been produced to familiarize data users with the design, and the procedures followed for data collection and processing, in the base year and first follow-up of the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09), with emphasis on the first follow-up. It also provides the necessary documentation for use of the public-use data files and information that will be helpful to analysts in accessing and understanding the restricted-use files.
11/14/2013
NCES 2014358 High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09) First Follow-up Public-use Data File
HSLS:09, the most recent of the secondary school longitudinal studies sponsored by NCES, follows a nationally-representative cohort of students who were in 9th grade in the fall of 2009. The first follow-up of HSLS:09 was conducted approximately two and a half years after the base year collection, in 2012. This newest wave includes data provided by students and their parents, math and science teachers, and school staff—both administrators and counselors. HSLS:09 emphasizes math and science as well as preparation for postsecondary education and the first follow-up features the following innovations: (1) HSLS:09 collected data from administrators in schools to which HSLS students transferred between fall of 2009 and 2012; (2) School counselor input on school programs available to students and families for postsecondary education and career planning was collected; and (3) The mathematics assessment added two new difficulty levels so that student growth in college preparatory math subjects could be studied.
11/13/2013
NCES 2014359 High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09) First Follow-up Restricted-use Data File
HSLS:09, the most recent of the secondary school longitudinal studies sponsored by NCES, follows a nationally-representative cohort of students who were in 9th grade in the fall of 2009. The first follow-up of HSLS:09 was conducted approximately two and a half years after the base year collection, in 2012. This newest wave includes data provided by students and their parents, math and science teachers, and school staff—both administrators and counselors. HSLS:09 emphasizes math and science as well as preparation for postsecondary education and the first follow-up features the following innovations: (1) HSLS:09 collected data from administrators in schools to which HSLS students transferred between fall of 2009 and 2012; (2) School counselor input on school programs available to students and families for postsecondary education and career planning was collected; and (3) The mathematics assessment added two new difficulty levels so that student growth in college preparatory math subjects could be studied.
11/13/2013
NCES 2014360 High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09) First Follow-up: A First Look at Fall 2009 Ninth-Graders in 2012
This First Look introduces new data from the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 collected in the spring of 2012 when most sample members were in their 11th-grade year. The analyses examine students’ educational expectations; students’ math performance on an algebra assessment, including gains since the 9th grade; students’ math and science efficacy; and students’ initial planning for postsecondary educational application and enrollment.
10/1/2013
NCES 2013038 Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) 2011 U.S. public-use datafile
This datafile contains the U.S. TIMSS 2011 data, including data that were collected only in the United States and not included on the international database available from the IEA. The additional data relate to the race and ethnicity of students and the percentage of students in a school eligible for the Federal free and reduced-price lunch program, among other variables. This datafile is intended to be used in conjunction with the international datafile available from the IEA.

A User Guide to the data is included in the U.S. TIMSS and PIRLS 2011 Technical Report, which is available online separately (publication number 2013046).
8/13/2013
WWC IRS620 Great Explorations in Math and Science (GEMS) The Real Reasons for Seasons
Great Explorations in Math and Science (GEMS) The Real Reasons for Seasons is a curriculum unit for grades 6-8 that focuses on the connections between the Sun and the Earth to teach students the scientific concepts behind the seasons. The WWC identified one study that examined the effects of GEMS The Real Reasons for Seasons on the science achievement of middle school students. The study is a randomized controlled trial that meets WWC evidence standards without reservations and included 4,777 seventh-grade students in 10 middle schools in Maryland. Based on the evidence presented in the study, the WWC found that GEMS The Real Reasons for Seasons has potentially negative effects on general science achievement for middle school students.
1/29/2013
NCES 2013009REV Highlights From TIMSS 2011: Mathematics and Science Achievement of U.S. Fourth- and Eighth-Grade Students in an International Context
The Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) 2011 is the fifth administration of this international comparative study since 1995 when first administered. TIMSS is used to compare over time the mathematics and science knowledge and skills of fourth- and eighth-graders. TIMSS is designed to align broadly with mathematics and science curricula in the participating countries. The results, therefore, suggest the degree to which students have learned mathematics and science concepts and skills likely to have been taught in school. In 2011, there were 54 countries and 20 other educational systems that participated in TIMSS, at the fourth- or eighth-grade level, or both.

The focus of the report is on the performance of U.S. students relative to their peers in other countries in 2011, and on changes in mathematics and science achievement since 2007 and 1995. For a number of participating countries and education systems, changes in achievement can be documented over the last 16 years, from 1995 to 2011. This report also describes achievement within the United States by sex, race/ethnicity, and enrollment in public schools with different levels of poverty. In addition, it describes achievement in nine states that participated in TIMSS both as part of the U.S. national sample of public and private schools as well as individually with state-level samples of public schools.

In addition to numerical scale results, TIMSS also includes international benchmarks. The TIMSS international benchmarks provide a way to interpret the scale scores by describing the types of knowledge and skills students demonstrate at different levels along the TIMSS scale.

After the initial release of the NCES TIMSS 2011 national report and supplemental tables, several minor changes were made to the report, Appendix A, and to footnotes in Appendix E. View the errata notice for details.
12/11/2012
NCEE 20124041 The Effectiveness of the Alabama Math, Science, and Technology Initiative (AMSTI)
For report NCEE 2012-4008 Evaluation of the Effectiveness of the Alabama Math, Science, and Technology Initiative (AMSTI) http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/edlabs/projects/project.asp?ProjectID=69

This data file contains data from a cluster randomized trial examined the impact of the Alabama Math, Science, and Technology Initiative (AMSTI) on student’s mathematical problem solving and science achievement. The study also examined the effects on teacher's classroom practice and active learning instructional strategies. The study found AMSTI had a positive and statistically significant effect on classroom practices in mathematics and science after one year. The study found small, but statistically significant gains in student achievement in mathematics, but no effect in science achievement. The sample includes 82 schools, with about 780 teachers and 30,000 students in grades 4–8.
11/26/2012
NCES 2013152 STEM in Postsecondary Education: Entrance, Attrition, and Coursetaking Among 2003-2004 Beginning Postsecondary Students
Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields are widely regarded as critical to the national economy. To provide a nationally representative portrait of undergraduate students’ experiences in STEM education, these Web Tables summarize longitudinal data from a cohort of first-time, beginning students who started postsecondary education in a bachelor’s or associate’s degree program in 2003−04, examining their entrance into and attrition from STEM fields and the extent to which they participated in STEM coursework over a period of 6 academic years, from 2003–04 to 2008–09.
10/10/2012
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