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 Pub Number  Title  Date
REL 2017175 Benchmarking the state of Pohnpei's education management information system
The purpose of this study was to provide information on the current quality of the education management information system (EMIS) in Pohnpei, Federated States of Micronesia, so that data specialists, administrators, and policy makers might identify areas for improvement. As part of a focus group interview, knowledgeable data specialists in Pohnpei responded to 46 questions covering significant areas of their EMIS. The interview protocol, adapted by Regional Educational Laboratory Pacific from the World Bank's System Assessment and Benchmarking for Education Results assessment tool, provides a means for rating aspects of an EMIS system using four benchmarking levels: latent (the process or action required to improve the aspect of quality is not in place), emerging (the process or action is in process of implementation), established (the process or action is in place and it meets standards), and mature (the process or action is an example of best practice). Overall, data specialists scored their EMIS as established. They reported that the prerequisites of quality, that is, both the institutional frameworks that govern the information system and data reporting, and the supporting resources, are established. They also rated integrity of education statistics, referring to the professionalism, objectivity, transparency, and ethical standards by which staff operate and statistics are reported, as established. Data specialists reported the accuracy and reliability of education statistics within their system to be established. They reported that the serviceability (the relevance, timeliness, and consistency of data) and accessibility of education data within their system are established. Results show that data specialists know and can apply sound techniques and validate data and generate statistical reports; however the system does not ensure that their roles and responsibilities are defined, nor does it provide any assurance, in the form of a legal mandate, that they receive the data they require. Data specialists provide timely services, but the system cannot assure the public that such services are provided independently, or that public has information regarding internal governmental access to statistics prior to their release. The results of this study provide the Pohnpei State Department of Education and the National Department of Education with information regarding the strengths and areas of the EMIS that may benefit from improvement efforts through the development of action plans focused on priority areas.
10/6/2016
REL 2017176 Benchmarking the state of Chuuk's education management information system
The purpose of this study was to provide information on the current quality of the education management information system (EMIS) in Chuuk, Federated States of Micronesia, so that data specialists, administrators, and policy makers might identify areas for improvement. As part of a focus group interview, knowledgeable data specialists in Chuuk responded to 46 questions covering significant areas of their EMIS. The interview protocol, adapted by Regional Educational Laboratory Pacific from the World Bank’s System Assessment and Benchmarking for Education Results assessment tool, provides a means for rating aspects of an EMIS system using four benchmarking levels: latent (the process or action required to improve the aspect of quality is not in place), emerging (the process or action is in progress of implementation), established (the process or action is in place and it meets standards), and mature (the process or action is an example of best practice). Overall, data specialists scored their EMIS as emerging. They reported that the prerequisites of quality, that is, both the institutional frameworks that govern the information system and data reporting, and the supporting resources, are established. They rated integrity of education statistics, referring to the professionalism, objectivity, transparency, and ethical standards by which staff operate and statistics are reported, as emerging. Data specialists reported the accuracy and reliability of education statistics within their system as established. They reported that the serviceability (the relevance, timeliness, and consistency of data) and accessibility of education data within their system are emerging. Results show that data specialists know and can apply sound techniques and validate data and generate statistical reports, and that the institutional frameworks and resources meet standards. Data specialists indicate that the relevance, timeliness, and consistency of the data and statistics provided to stakeholders could be improved. In addition, the reports that present these data and statistics could be better adapted for the intended audience. The results of this study provide the Chuuk State Department of Education and the National Department of Education with information regarding the strengths and areas of the EMIS that may benefit from improvement efforts through the development of action plans focused on priority areas.
10/6/2016
NCES 2011802 Traveling Through Time: The Forum Guide to Longitudinal Data Systems Book IV: Advanced LDS Usage
This document, Book Four of Four: Advanced LDS Usage, is the fourth and final installment of this Forum series of guides on longitudinal data systems (LDS). One goal of the Forum is to improve the quality of education data gathered for use by policymakers and program decisionmakers. An approach to furthering this goal has been to pool the collective experiences of Forum members to produce “best practice” guides in areas of high interest to those who collect, maintain, and use data about elementary and secondary education. Developing LDSs is one of those high-interest areas. These systems hold promise for enhancing both the way education agencies use data to serve students and the way they do business, from the policy level to the school office and into the classroom.
7/25/2011
NFES 2011805 Traveling Through Time: The Forum Guide to Longitudinal Data Systems Book III: Effectively Managing LDS Data
This document, Book Three of Four: Effectively Managing LDS Data, is the third installment of this Forum series of guides on longitudinal data systems (LDS). One goal of the Forum is to improve the quality of education data gathered for use by policymakers and program decisionmakers. An approach to furthering this goal has been to pool the collective experiences of Forum members to produce “best practice” guides in areas of high interest to those who collect, maintain, and use data about elementary and secondary education. Developing LDSs is one of those high-interest areas. These systems hold promise for enhancing both the way education agencies use data to serve students and the way they do business, from the policy level to the school office and into the classroom.
2/7/2011
NFES 2011804 Traveling Through Time: The Forum Guide to Longitudinal Data Systems Book II: Planning and Developing an LDS
This book, Planning and Developing an LDS, is the second in a four-part series about longitudinal data systems (LDS). The first book, What is an LDS?, focused on the fundamental questions of what an LDS is (and what it is not), what steps should be taken to achieve a sound system, what components make up an ideal system, and why such a system is of value in education. The present installment discusses the early stages of LDS development, and will help state and local education agencies through the process of determining what they want to accomplish with their LDS and what they will need in order to achieve these goals. The organization’s vision for an LDS should be heavily informed by the needs of a broad range of stakeholders. Throughout the systems development life cycle, policymakers and system developers need to engage in self-assessment, identifying the system they have before figuring out what type of system they want. Policymakers’ requirements should be driven by the needs of the education community, the costs involved given the legacy system and staff, and the institutional support for the project. Planners should ensure project sustainability by creating interest and sustained buy-in, and by securing long-term funding. Procurement planning must be done, that is, lining up a vendor or building the staffing capacity to construct the system. In addition, having the right developers may not be enough: an informed commitment to building, using, and maintaining the LDS must permeate the organization to ensure long-term success. And, throughout the life of the system, thorough evaluation must be done on a regular basis to ensure continued data quality and user satisfaction.
1/19/2011
NFES 2010805 Traveling Through Time: The Forum Guide to Longitudinal Data Systems Book I: What is an LDS?
This first book in the guide series focuses on the fundamental questions of what an LDS is (and what it is not), what steps should be taken to achieve a sound system, what components make up an ideal system, and why such a system is of value in education. Chapter 1 introduces this guide series, discussing its purpose, format, and intended audience. Chapter 2 covers some LDS basics, defining the concept of a "longitudinal data system" and laying out key nontechnical steps to planning and developing a successful system. Chapter 3 presents the technical components that generally comprise an LDS, as well as some additional features that may enhance the system. Chapter 4 addresses some common misconceptions regarding longitudinal data systems. Chapter 5 discusses the overarching benefits of an LDS.
7/26/2010
NCES 2005111REV Rates of Computer and Internet Use by Children in Nursery School and Students in Kindergarten Through Twelfth Grade: 2003
This Issue Brief describes the percentage of students in grades 12 or below who used computers or the Internet in 2003. The Brief highlights the fact that computer and Internet use is commonplace and begins early. Even before kindergarten, a majority of children in nursery school use computers and, and 23 percent use the Internet.
12/10/2005
NCES 2003381 Weaving a Secure Web Around Education: A Guide to Technology Standards and Security
Weaving a Secure Web Around Education: A Guide to Technology Standards and Security is a publication of the National Center For Education Statistics' National Forum on Education Statistics. This publication provides recommendations for development, maintenance, and standardization for effective web sites.
3/31/2003
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