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 Pub Number  Title  Date
NCES 2017095 Technical Report and User Guide for the 2015 Program for International Student Assessment (PISA)
This technical report and user guide is designed to provide researchers with an overview of the design and implementation of PISA 2015 in the United States, as well as information on how to access the PISA 2015 data. The report includes information about sampling requirements and sampling in the United States; participation rates at the school and student level; how schools and students were recruited; instrument development; field operations used for collecting data; detail concerning various aspects of data management, including data processing, scaling, and weighting. In addition, the report describes the data available from both international and U.S. sources, special issues in analyzing the PISA 2015 data, as well as a description of merging data files.
12/19/2017
NCES 2017116 Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2015 Massachusetts Restricted-use Data Files
This CD-ROM contains PISA 2015 restricted-use data for Massachusetts, which participated in PISA separately from the nation. The CD-ROM includes all data files connected to data collection in Massachusetts: student, teacher, and principal/school files. These files also include a unique NCES school ID number that can be used to merge the data files with other public NCES datasets, such as the Common Core of Data (CCD) and Private School Survey (PSS). As these data files can be used to identify respondent schools, a restricted-use license must be obtained before access to the data is granted. Click on the restricted-use license link below for more details. Users of these data files are encouraged to refer to the PISA 2015 Technical Report, which provides details on the methods and operations used in collecting the data. The PISA 2015 Technical Report can be found at https://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2017095.
12/19/2017
NCES 2017118 Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2015 North Carolina Restricted-use Data Files
This CD-ROM contains PISA 2015 restricted-use data for North Carolina, which participated in PISA separately from the nation. The CD-ROM includes all data files connected to data collection in Massachusetts: student, teacher, and principal/school files. These files also include a unique NCES school ID number that can be used to merge the data files with other public NCES datasets, such as the Common Core of Data (CCD) and Private School Survey (PSS). As these data files can be used to identify respondent schools, a restricted-use license must be obtained before access to the data is granted. Click on the restricted-use license link below for more details. Users of these data files are encouraged to refer to the PISA 2015 Technical Report, which provides details on the methods and operations used in collecting the data. The PISA 2015 Technical Report can be found at https://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2017095.
12/19/2017
NCES 2017119 Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2015 Puerto Rico Restricted-use Data Files
This CD-ROM contains PISA 2015 restricted-use data for Puerto Rico, which participated in PISA separately from the nation. The CD-ROM includes all data files connected to data collection in Massachusetts: student, teacher, and principal/school files. These files also include a unique NCES school ID number that can be used to merge the data files with other public NCES datasets, such as the Common Core of Data (CCD) and Private School Survey (PSS). As these data files can be used to identify respondent schools, a restricted-use license must be obtained before access to the data is granted. Click on the restricted-use license link below for more details. Users of these data files are encouraged to refer to the PISA 2015 Technical Report, which provides details on the methods and operations used in collecting the data. The PISA 2015 Technical Report can be found at https://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2017095.
12/19/2017
NCES 2017120 Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2015 United States public-use data files
The data files include the U.S. PISA 2015 data files for students, teachers, and principals/schools, and include additional variables only available at the national level (e.g., student race/ethnicity). The public-use data files can be downloaded and analyzed by researchers interested in conducting secondary analyses. In addition to the U.S. data files, the product also includes a README file, illustrative merge code, a Quick Guide, variable codebooks, SAS and SPSS control files, and record layout files. The data files are presented in ASCII, and can be imported into any number of statistical programs, such as SAS, SPSS, or STATA. These public-use data files can be used on their own or merged with the international PISA database available for download from the OECD PISA website at http://www.oecd.org/pisa/data/. Users of the U.S. PISA 2015 data files are encouraged to refer to the Technical Report which provides details on the methods and operations used in collecting PISA data in the United States. The PISA 2015 Technical Report can be found at https://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2017095.
12/19/2017
NCES 2017121 Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2015 United States Restricted-use Data File
This CD-ROM contains PISA 2015 restricted-use data for the United States. The CD-ROM includes the data file, a codebook, instructions on how to merge with the U.S. PISA 2015 public-use dataset (NCES 2017-120), and a cross-walk to assist in merging with other public datasets, such as the Common Core of Data (CCD) and Private School Survey (PSS). As these data files can be used to identify respondent schools, a restricted-use license must be obtained before access to the data is granted. Click on the restricted-use license link below for more details.
12/19/2017
NCES 2017249 Collaborative Problem Solving Skills of 15-Year-Olds: Results From PISA 2015
The focus of this Data Point is on the performance of students in the United States relative to their peers in 50 other education systems that participated in the PISA collaborative problem solving assessment in 2015. The PISA assessment of collaborative problem solving measured students’ ability to solve a problem by sharing the understanding and effort required to come to a solution, and pooling their knowledge, skills, and effort to reach that solution. Readers interested in more detailed data related to collaborative problem solving should also visit the NCES PISA website for data tables and figures. Please visit https://nces.ed.gov/surveys/pisa/pisa2015/index.asp to learn more.
11/21/2017
REL 2017269 Comparing enrollment, characteristics, and academic outcomes of students in developmental courses and those in credit-bearing courses at Northern Marianas College
This study reports on the academic outcomes of full-time first time freshman seeking associate degrees who entered Northern Marianas College from fall semester 2008 through fall semester 2010. In English, 80.1 percent of these students enrolled in developmental courses; in math, 91 percent enrolled in developmental courses. To determine their academic outcomes, these students were tracked for eight semesters after their first year in college. The study found that students who initially enrolled in credit-bearing English or math classes had consistently more positive outcomes than students who initially enrolled in non-credit developmental English or math courses.
4/26/2017
REL 2017271 What is the evidence base to support reading interventions for improving student outcomes in grades 1-3?
The goal of this report is to provide administrators, school psychologists, counselors, special educators, and reading specialists with a summary and analysis of the evidence that supports the use of reading interventions in grades 1-3. The review was limited to studies of Tier 2 interventions, those designed to provide preventive services to students at risk for reading difficulties. The initial literature search identified 1,813 articles and reports. After screening them for relevance and conducting a detailed What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) analysis of the rigor of the study designs, the review team determined that only 23 effectiveness studies met WWC evidence standards (Version 3.0). Of those, 22 resulted in either significant, positive, or potentially positive impacts in at least one area of reading. None produced negative outcomes. Twelve of the 13 grade 1 interventions and all seven interventions for grades 2 and 3 produced positive or potentially positive effects. Effects were strongest and most consistent in the area of word and pseudoword reading. Several also produced effects in reading comprehension and passage reading fluency. Reading vocabulary was rarely assessed. Both individually administered and small-group interventions resulted in positive or potentially positive outcomes, although especially in grade 1, more of the interventions were one-on-one. In all cases, the interventionist received some training prior to implementing the intervention. However, these studies differed from common school practice in that implementation was carefully monitored in virtually all instances and coaching or feedback was provided. It is unclear how generalizable these findings are when the typical amount of ongoing support for interventionists is far more limited in practice.
4/20/2017
NCES 2017286 ECLS-K:2011 Public-Use Kindergarten-Second Grade Data File and Electronic Codebook
The Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 2010-11 (ECLS-K:2011) is a longitudinal study following a nationally representative sample of students from their kindergarten year to the spring of 2016, when most of the students are expected to be in fifth grade. This public-use data file includes information collected during the fall and spring of the 2010-11 school year, when all of the students were in kindergarten, the fall and spring of the 2011-12 school year, when most of the students were in first grade, and the fall and spring of the 2012-13 school year, when most of the students were in second grade. The file includes information collected from the students, their parents/guardians, their teachers, and their school administrators in the first two years of the study. It also includes information collected in the spring of 2011 from their kindergarten-year before- and after-school care providers.
3/1/2017
REL 2017232 What are the college outcomes for the Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools high school class of 2007 after six years?
Regional Educational Laboratory Appalachia partnered with the Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools (MNPS) to conduct this study, which examines college enrollment, persistence, and performance for the MNPS high school class of 2007 six years after high school graduation. The study used student-level data from the Tennessee Department of Education to define the graduating cohort of 2007 and to describe students' demographic characteristics. These data were linked with postsecondary data from the Tennessee Higher Education Commission (THEC) and the National Student Clearinghouse (NSC). The NSC provided enrollment and degree-completion data for students enrolled in a public postsecondary institution, and THEC provided data on credits earned and grade point average (GPA) for students enrolled in a Tennessee public postsecondary institution. Neither source provided data on private institutions, and NSC does not collect credit or GPA data. The study found that whereas first-time postsecondary enrollment rates for MNPS were similar to the statewide average, degree completion rates were lower for MNPS students than for students statewide. At the same time, gaps in enrollment and degree completion rates between White and Black students were smaller in MNPS than statewide. MNPS students overall performed below their peers statewide in their first year of college, but Black MNPS students had a higher mean GPA and earned more credits than Black students statewide. Results suggest several areas for further study. For example, Black/White enrollment, degree completion, and performance gaps in MNPS may be smaller than those statewide either because students from a single district may be more homogeneous or for reasons specific to MNPS. Additional outcomes or analytical techniques may reveal further differences between MNPS and students elsewhere in the state. In particular, as there were too few students who were non-White and non-Black to include in quantitative analysis, qualitative research may be necessary to determine the performance and needs of these students.
2/8/2017
NCES 2016014 Digest of Education Statistics, 2015
The 51st in a series of publications initiated in 1962, the Digest's purpose is to provide a compilation of statistical information covering the broad field of education from prekindergarten through graduate school. The Digest contains data on a variety of topics, including the number of schools and colleges, teachers, enrollments, and graduates, in addition to educational attainment, finances, and federal funds for education, libraries, and international comparisons.
12/8/2016
NCES 2017002 Highlights from TIMSS and TIMSS Advanced 2015: Mathematics and Science Achievement of U.S. Students in Grades 4 and 8 and in Advanced Courses at the End of High School in an International Context
The Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) 2015 is the sixth administration of this international comparative study since 1995 when first administered. TIMSS is used to compare over time the mathematics and science knowledge and skills of fourth- and eighth-graders. TIMSS is designed to align broadly with mathematics and science curricula in the participating countries. The results, therefore, suggest the degree to which students have learned mathematics and science concepts and skills likely to have been taught in school. In 2015, TIMSS was administered in 49 IEA member countries and 6 other education systems at grade 4, and in 38 IEA member countries and 6 other education systems at grade 8.

TIMSS Advanced assesses the advanced mathematics and physics knowledge and skills of students at the end of high school who have taken courses in advanced mathematics and physics. TIMSS Advanced 2015 represents only the second administration in which the United States has participated since the first administration in 1995, and is designed to align broadly with the advanced mathematics and physics curricula in the participating countries. The results, therefore, suggest the degree to which students have learned the advanced mathematics and physics concepts and skills likely to have been taught in school. Nine countries participated in TIMSS Advanced 2015.

The focus of the report is on the performance of U.S. students relative to their peers in other countries on TIMSS and TIMSS Advanced 2015, and, for TIMSS results, on changes in achievement since 2011 and 1995. For a number of participating countries and education systems, changes in achievement can be documented over the last 20 years, from 1995 to 2015. This report also describes the characteristics of students who participated in the advanced mathematics and physics assessments at the end of high school, and describes the performance of males and females in these subjects. In addition, it includes achievement in Florida, a U.S. state that participated in TIMSS both as part of the U.S. national sample of public and private schools as well as individually with state-level samples of public schools.

In addition to numerical scale results, TIMSS also includes international benchmarks. The TIMSS international benchmarks provide a way to interpret the scale scores by describing the types of knowledge and skills students demonstrate at different levels along the TIMSS scale.

Additional tables with TIMSS and TIMSS Advanced results will be available on the NCES website at http://nces.ed.gov/timss/timss15.asp.
11/29/2016
REL 2017202 The characteristics and education outcomes of American Indian students in grades 6–12 in North Carolina
The purpose of this study was to compare American Indian students in grades 6–12 in North Carolina to all other students in the same grades both within the same schools and statewide on student demographics, school characteristics, and education outcomes. The North Carolina State Advisory Council on Indian Education (SACIE) requested this research based on a prior report identifying achievement gaps between American Indian students and White students. The primary source of quantitative data for this study is longitudinal administrative data provided to the Education Policy Initiative at Carolina by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction (NCDPI). These data include student-level outcomes for all students in grades 6–12 in North Carolina public schools for the school years 2010/11 through 2013/14. Outcomes considered include state test scores, attendance, retention in grade, advanced course taking, graduation rates, and disciplinary referrals. Quantitative analyses include all American Indian students in grades 6–12 in North Carolina public schools for school years 2010/11 through 2013/14. Students of other ethnicities in the same grades and years both within the same schools and statewide serve as comparison groups. Descriptive analyses compare averages for all student characteristics, school characteristics, and education outcomes for American Indian students compared to their within school and statewide peers. Regression analyses using multilevel modeling were used examine the extent to which controlling for student, school, and teacher characteristics accounts for differences in outcomes between American Indian students and their peers. The analyses found that American Indian students are demographically different from non-American Indian students statewide, but similar to other students attending the same schools. Schools attended by American Indian students are more likely to be rural and in the Coastal plain. American Indians also tend to attend schools that serve more economically disadvantaged students and more disadvantaged minority students. Across all middle school and high school standardized tests, American Indian students have lower average scores than other students statewide and within the same schools. American Indian students are absent more often on average than their peers both statewide and within the same school, are less likely to take advanced courses, and graduate at lower rates, but are equally likely to be retained in grade as their peers. When school and student demographics are held constant, the size of the gaps on most outcomes between American Indian students and their peers both within the same schools and statewide are substantially reduced.
11/17/2016
REL 2017206 Characteristics and education outcomes of Utah high school dropouts who re-enrolled
While numerous studies have examined the national dropout crisis, comparatively little is known about students who drop out but later return to high school. Following a cohort of students expected to graduate from Utah public schools in 2011 after four years of high school, this report describes the extent of dropout and reenrollment statewide; how dropout and reenrollment rates differed by demographic characteristics; how academic progress differed for re-enrollees prior to leaving school compared to students who graduated without an interruption in enrollment and dropouts who did not return; and the final high school outcomes of dropouts who came back to school. Findings indicate that while three-fourths of the students in the 2011 graduating cohort earned a diploma in four years, about a fifth of the students dropped out and, among them, about a fifth returned to school by 2011. Students with certain demographic characteristics were more likely to drop out and less likely to reenroll, such as Black students and English learner students, putting them at particular risk for not graduating. The percentage of dropouts who reenrolled decreased with each year of school, but some re-enrollees still earned a diploma. Among those who had dropped out and reenrolled by 2011, 26 percent graduated on time with the cohort. Among those who dropped out and reenrolled by 2013—extending the analysis two years beyond the conventional four years of high school—the graduation rate for re-enrollees increased to 30 percent. Results show that while dropping out is not necessarily a permanent outcome, re-enrollees as a group are at risk for poor graduation outcomes. Identifying and supporting dropouts who return for another chance to graduate can boost their chances to earn a diploma.
11/10/2016
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