Skip Navigation

Search Results: (16-30 of 50 records)

 Pub Number  Title  Date
NCES 2014141 Baccalaureate and Beyond: A First Look at the Employment Experiences and Lives of College Graduates, 4 Years On (B&B:08/12)
This report presents initial findings about the employment outcomes of bachelor's degree recipients approximately 4 years after they completed their 2007–08 degrees. These findings are based on data from the second follow-up of the Baccalaureate and Beyond Longitudinal Study (B&B:08/12), a nationally representative longitudinal sample survey of students who completed the requirements for a bachelor's degree during the 2007–08 academic year. The study addresses questions related to bachelor's degree recipients' education and employment experiences and includes two follow-ups. The first follow-up, which was conducted 1 year after graduation, explored both undergraduate education experiences and early postbaccalaureate employment and enrollment. This second follow-up, conducted in 2012, examines bachelor's degree recipients' labor market experiences and enrollment in additional postsecondary degree programs through the 4th year after graduation.
7/8/2014
NCES 2014011 Degrees of Debt: Student Loan Repayment of Bachelor’s Degree Recipients 1 Year After Graduating: 1994, 2001, and 2009
This Statistics In Brief examines the rate of borrowing and the cumulative student loan debt of bachelor’s degree recipients 1 year after they attained their degrees. It compares three cohorts spanning a 15-year period: 1994, 2001, and 2009.
10/1/2013
NCES 2013155 Federal Student Loan Debt Burden of Noncompleters
Federal Student Loan Debt Burden of Noncompleters, a Statistics in Brief, focuses on the median federal student debt burden accrued by students who do not complete a postsecondary credential within 6 years of enrolling. It is based on data from the two most recent longitudinal studies of beginning postsecondary students conducted by the National Center for Education Statistics: students who first enrolled in 1995-96 (as of 2001) and those who first enrolled in 2003-04 (as of 2009).

Highlights include:

• In 2009, the percentage of noncompleters after 6 years ranged from 19 percent of students in private nonprofit 4-year institutions to 46 percent in public 2-year colleges or for-profit institutions. An increase in noncompletion between 2001 and 2009 was observed only for students in for-profit institutions (35 percent to 46 percent).

• In 2009, borrowing rates from federal student loan programs ranged from 25 percent of students in public 2-year colleges to 86 percent in for-profit institutions; comparable rates for students in 4-year public and 4-year private nonprofit institutions were 54 percent and 66 percent, respectively. Note: these rates are for noncompleters.

• In 2009, the cumulative amount borrowed per credit earned was highest for noncompleters in for-profit institutions ($350 per credit, compared with $80 to $190 per credit in the other three sectors).

• In 2009, the median cumulative federal student debt for all noncompleters amounted to 35 percent of their annual income; debt burden was highest for students in 4-year private nonprofit institutions (median debt equaled 51 percent of borrowers’ annual income). Debt burden among noncompleters who started in for-profit institutions increased from 20 percent to 43 percent of annual income between 2001 and 2009.
4/9/2013
NCES 2013150 Web Tables—Profile of 2007–08 First-Time Bachelor’s Degree Recipients in 2009
These Web Tables use data from the first follow-up of the 2008 Baccalaureate and Beyond (B&B:08/09) study to display a wide range of information on demographic characteristics, educational experiences, and student loan borrowing of 2007–08 first-time bachelor’s degree recipients. In addition to undergraduate experiences, tables display information on employment, community service, postbaccalaureate enrollment, and student loan debt 1 year after bachelor’s degree completion. Results are shown by selected student demographic and enrollment characteristics.
10/31/2012
NCES 2013156 Web Tables—Trends in Debt for Bachelor’s Degree Recipients a Year After Graduation: 1994, 2001 and 2009
This report presents a comprehensive set of tables about the debt of recent college graduates for three cohorts of bachelor’s degree recipients spanning a 15-year period. Tables feature statistics on loan repayment, further educational pursuits, and employment status of first-time bachelor’s degree recipients who graduated in 1992–93, 1999–2000, and 2007–08. Borrowing and debt detail includes the percentage of college graduates who borrowed, the cumulative amount borrowed to obtain a bachelor’s degree, repayment status after 1 year, average amounts owed, average monthly payments, and debt burden for all three cohorts. Tables also present information about subsequent enrollment in post-bachelor’s education, participation in the labor market, including K-12 teaching, and annual salary. Lastly, tables present graduates’ debt status relative to their living arrangements, (with parents, own or rent residence), family formation, and whether borrowers had a spouse also repaying loans. All tables are broken out by key demographic, enrollment, and employment characteristics.
1/2/2012
NCES 2011218 Trends in Student Financing of Undergraduate Education: Selected Years, 1995–96 to 2007–08
Drawing on the 1995–96, 1999–2000, 2003–04, and 2007–08 National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS), these Web Tables present trends in financial aid that was awarded to undergraduate students attending postsecondary institutions in the United States. Data include price of attendance, tuition and fees, type of financial aid received from federal, state, and institutional sources, net price of attendance (price minus all grants), out-of-pocket net price (price minus all aid), and financial need. These are shown by enrollment and demographic characteristics such as sex, race/ethnicity, age, dependency status, family income, attendance status, and type of institution attended.
1/12/2011
NCES 2010180 Web Tables—Trends in Graduate Borrowing: Selected Years, 1995-96 to 2007-08
Drawing on the 1995-96, 1999-2000, 2003-04, and 2007-08 National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS), these Web Tables present trends in borrowing such as borrowing rates, average loan amounts, cumulative loan amounts for undergraduate and graduate levels, average ratio of loans to total financial aid, and rates of borrowing the full maximum Stafford loan amount for graduate and first-professional students. These data are grouped by degree program, attendance intensity, and institution type.
10/4/2010
NCES 2010162 Web Tables—Student Financing of Undergraduate Education: 2007–08
These Web Tables are a comprehensive source of information on financial aid that was awarded to undergraduate students attending postsecondary institutions in the United States during the 2007–08 academic year. Data include tuition and fees, price of attendance, type of financial aid received from federal, state, and institutional sources, net tuition (tuition and fees minus all grants), net price of attendance (price minus all grants), out-of-pocket net price (price minus all aid), and financial need. These are shown by enrollment and demographic characteristics such as dependency status, residence, race/ethnicity, gender, citizenship, family income, attendance status, and type of institution attended.
8/17/2010
NCES 2010183 Web Tables—Trends in Undergraduate Stafford Loan Borrowing: 1989-90 to 2007-08
These tables show undergraduate Stafford loan borrowing rates and average Stafford loan amounts from 1989–90 to 2007–08, using data from six separate administrations of the National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS): NPSAS:90, NPSAS:93, NPSAS:96, NPSAS:2000, NPSAS:04, and NPSAS:08. Estimates are shown separately for undergraduates enrolled in public 4-year, private nonprofit 4-year, public 2-year, and for-profit institutions.
8/10/2010
NCES 2009182 Issue Tables: A Profile of Military Servicemembers and Veterans Enrolled in Postsecondary Education in 2007-08
This set of Issue Tables describes military servicemembers and veterans in undergraduate education at institutions eligible for Title IV federal funding for financial aid. The data come from 2007-08, just prior to the Post-9/11 Veterans Educational Assistance Act's implementation. The purpose is to provide baseline data with which to compare undergraduate enrollment and student characteristics of current military undergraduates with their future counterparts who will enroll in postsecondary education under the New GI Bill.
5/11/2009
NCES 2008031 The Condition of Education 2008
The Condition of Education 2008 summarizes important developments and trends in education using the latest available data. The report presents 43 indicators on the status and condition of education. The indicators represent a consensus of professional judgment on the most significant national measures of the condition and progress of education for which accurate data are available. The 2008 print edition includes 43 indicators in five main areas: (1) participation in education; (2) learner outcomes; (3) student effort and educational progress; (4) the contexts of elementary and secondary education; and (5) the contexts of postsecondary education.
5/29/2008
NCES 2008179REV Trends in Undergraduate Borrowing II: Federal Student Loans in 1995-96, 1999-2000, and 2003-04
This Postsecondary Education Descriptive Analysis Report uses data from the National Postsecondary Student Aid Studies (NPSAS:96, NPSAS:2000 and NPSAS:04) to examine trends in Stafford loan borrowing among undergraduates. Since 1995-96, borrowing of subsidized Stafford loans increased among low-income dependent undergraduates and among independent students at all income levels. The rate of borrowing any Stafford loan (subsidized or unsubsidized) increased among all but those in the lowest income category, for both dependent and independent undergraduates alike. While the average amount of subsidized loans has leveled off over time, unsubsidized loans have continued to grow both in the amount of the average loan as well as in the percentage of borrowers. Unlike subsidized loans, interest on an unsubsidized loan accrues and is usually added to the principal of the loan while the student is enrolled in school and not yet in repayment. This study found that between 1995-96 and 2003-04, an increasing proportion of both dependent and independent student borrowers at all income levels took out unsubsidized loans either alone or in addition to their subsidized loans. This was true particularly among independent students whose higher loan limits allow more of them to take out both types of loans. The Stafford loan program permits dependent students to take out both subsidized and unsubsidized loans, but the combined amount cannot exceed the maximum amount of a single loan. In 2003-04, about three-fourths (73 percent) of all dependent student borrowers took out the annual maximum amount allowed in subsidized and unsubsidized Stafford loans combined. This was an increase from 57 percent in 1995-96.
3/18/2008
NCES 2007064 The Condition of Education 2007
The Condition of Education 2007 summarizes important developments and trends in education using the latest available data. The report presents 48 indicators on the status and condition of education and a special analysis on high school coursetaking. The indicators represent a consensus of professional judgment on the most significant national measures of the condition and progress of education for which accurate data are available. The 2007 print edition includes 48 indicators in five main areas: (1) participation in education; (2) learner outcomes; (3) student effort and educational progress; (4) the contexts of elementary and secondary education; and (5) the contexts of postsecondary education.
5/31/2007
NCES 2005150 Baccalaureate and Beyond Longitudinal Study 1993/2003 Data Analysis System (DAS) On-line
The DAS contains data from the 2003 Baccalaureate and Beyond Longitudinal Study (B&B:1993/2003). This study is the third follow-up of a national sample of students who completed bachelor degrees in academic year 1992-1993 and were first surveyed as part of the National Postsecondary Student Aid Study. This DAS allows users to conduct analyses on data gathered in this study while on-line via the web.
9/20/2006
NCES 2006186 Student Financing of Undergraduate Education: 2003–04, With a Special Analysis of the Net Price of Attendance and Federal Education Tax Benefits
This report, based on data from the 2003-04 National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS:04), provides detailed information about undergraduate tuition and total price of attendance at various types of institutions, the percentage of students receiving various types of financial aid, and the average amounts that they received. In 2003-04, three-quarters of all full-time undergraduates received some type of financial aid ($9,900 average). One-half took out student loans ($6,200 average), and 62 percent received grants ($5,600 average). Forty percent received both grants and loans (combined average $13,600). The average tuition and fees for full-time undergraduates in 2003-04 were $2,000 at public 2-year, $5,400 at public 4-year, and $18,400 at private not-for-profit 4-year institutions. About one-fourth of full-time undergraduates did not pay any tuition, because the entire tuition amount was covered by grants. Nearly one-half of full-time low-income dependent undergraduates had their entire tuition amount covered by grant aid. The total price of attendance (tuition plus room and board and other expenses) for full-time undergraduates in 2003-04 was $10,500 at public 2-year, $15,200 at public 4-year, and $28,300 at private not-for-profit 4-year institutions. After subtracting all financial aid (including loans), the average out-of-pocket net price of attendance for full-time low-income dependent undergraduates was $6,000 at public 2-year, $5,600 at public 4-year and $9,200 at private nonprofit 4-year institutions. In addition, this report presents estimates of the federal education tax benefits for students (Hope and Lifetime Learning tax credits, and tuition deductions): nearly one-half (49 percent) of all undergraduates or their parents had their taxes reduced by an average of $600 by claiming these benefits. Middle-income students were the most likely to receive these tax benefits. Among the families of upper-middle-income students, more than two-thirds (69 percent) received an average reduction in federal taxes of $1,100.
8/23/2006
<< Prev    16 - 30     Next >>
Page 2  of  4