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 Pub Number  Title  Date
REL 2021111 Professional Development Incentives for Oregon's Early Childhood Education Workforce: A Randomized Study
Many states seek to increase the education levels of their early childhood education (ECE) workforce to improve the quality of care for children. Oregon encourages all ECE workforce members to sign up for a career lattice, a career pathway system that helps them determine goals related to increasing their education. The state also offers incentives for reaching specific steps in the career lattice and scholarships for college credit and community-based training. This study used two randomized controlled trials in 2018 and 2019 to test whether sending emails and offering different financial incentives to Oregon ECE workforce members increased career lattice sign-up and increased education and training levels or workplace retention. The study found that sending emails encouraging career lattice sign-up had no detectable impact on career lattice sign-up or workplace retention. Sending emails offering a monetary incentive at an earlier-than-usual step on the career lattice had a positive impact on training hours recorded but no detectable impact on career lattice movement, college credit hours earned, or workplace retention. Sending emails about automatic enrollment in a scholarship program had no detectable impact on scholarship use, career lattice movement, college credit hours earned, or workplace retention. Lastly, after participants were randomly assigned to study groups, the email campaigns were implemented as planned, reaching all intended participants, although the interventions ended sooner than planned because of a state policy change. The findings suggest that low-touch interventions such as emails have promise for increasing training hours but are not sufficient to induce changes in career lattice sign-up, continuing postsecondary education, or workplace retention for Oregon ECE workforce members. These results have implications for future research, in addition to demonstrating how better messaging and supports can mitigate barriers to further education and training and how email campaigns can be leveraged for workforce communication efforts. This information is particularly relevant for state agencies and education and training providers.
8/24/2021
REL 2021084 Effectiveness of Early Literacy Instruction: Summary of 20 Years of Research
Children entering kindergarten vary greatly in their language and literacy skills. Therefore, up-to-date information about evidence-based practices is essential for early childhood educators and policymakers as they support preschool children’s language and literacy development. This study used a process modeled after the What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) methodology to systematically identify effective early childhood curricula, lesson packages, instructional practices, and technology programs in studies conducted from 1997 to 2017. More than 74,000 studies were analyzed to identify interventions that improved students' performance in six language and literacy domains (language, phonological awareness, print knowledge, decoding, early writing, and general literacy). The study team identified 132 interventions evaluated by 109 studies that the study team determined were high-quality experimental or quasi-experimental studies. The WWC's evidence standards are used to assess the quality of an evaluation study and the strength of its claims about whether an intervention caused the observed effect on student achievement. To better understand the effectiveness of the interventions, their implementation characteristics and instructional features were coded for the relevant language and literacy domains. The findings revealed that instruction that teaches a specific domain is likely to increase performance in that domain. Interventions that teach language exclusively might be more beneficial when conducted in small groups or one-on-one than in larger group sizes. In addition, teaching both phonological awareness and print knowledge might benefit performance in print knowledge. Finally, some evidence indicates that instruction that teaches both phonological awareness and print knowledge might also lead to improvements in decoding and early writing performance.
7/26/2021
NCES 2020075REV Early Childhood Program Participation: 2019
This First Look report presents findings about young children’s care and education before kindergarten, including participation rates in weekly nonparental care arrangements, how well these arrangements cover work hours, costs of care, months spent in care, location of care, factors used to select a care arrangement, and factors making it difficult to find care. These data represent circumstances before the implementation of COVID-19 restrictions.
5/12/2021
REL 2021069 Center- and Program-Level Factors Associated with Turnover in the Early Childhood Education Workforce
Staff turnover is a pressing problem in early childhood education. High turnover can create organizational instability and distract from the care and education mandate of early childhood education centers. The Early Childhood Workforce Development Research Alliance of the Regional Educational Laboratory Northeast & Islands wants to better understand the factors associated with turnover in the early childhood educator workforce. Using data from the 2012 National Survey of Early Care and Education, this study found that a low average turnover rate across early childhood education centers obscured systematic variation in turnover patterns across types of centers and programs, with high turnover rates in some types. Higher wages were associated with lower turnover rates across centers. Turnover rates were highest among private-pay centers serving children ages 0–5. Nonwage benefits such as health insurance and retirement benefits and paid time off for professional development were generally unrelated to turnover rates. Educators were also clustered into certain center types based on background characteristics; Black educators and educators with lower educational attainment more likely to work in centers with low wages and high turnover.
3/29/2021
NCES 2021005 Early Child Care in Single-Parent and Two-Parent Families: 2019
This Data Point compares child care arrangements for children from birth through age 5, in single-parent families and two-parent families. It also examines problems finding childcare.
3/26/2021
REL 2021067 Early Childhood Data Use Assessment Tool
The Early Childhood Data Use Assessment Tool is designed to identify and improve data use skills among early childhood education (ECE) program staff so they can better use data to inform, plan, monitor, and make decisions for instruction and program improvement. Data use is critical in quality ECE programs but can be intimidating for some ECE program staff. This tool supports growth in their data use skills. The tool has three components: (1) a checklist to identify staff skills in using child assessment and administrative data, (2) a resource guide to identify professional development resources for improving data use skills, and (3) an action plan template to support planning for the development and achievement of data use goals. Results obtained from using the tool are meant by the developers to support instruction and program improvement through increased and structured use of data.
3/2/2021
NCES 2021009 Digest of Education Statistics, 2019
The 55th in a series of publications initiated in 1962, the Digest's purpose is to provide a compilation of statistical information covering the broad field of education from prekindergarten through graduate school. The Digest contains data on a variety of topics, including the number of schools and colleges, teachers, enrollments, and graduates, in addition to educational attainment, finances, and federal funds for education, libraries, and international comparisons.
2/25/2021
NCES 2021031 National Household Education Surveys Program of 2019 Restricted-Use Data Files
The National Household Education Surveys Program (NHES): 2019 restricted-use files include the Early Childhood Program Participation (ECPP) file and the Parent and Family Involvement in Education (PFI) file. Data files are being released for each of the surveys and are being released with ASCII, SAS, SPSS, Stata, CSV, and R formats available.
1/28/2021
NCES 2021032 National Household Education Survey Programs of 2019 Public-Use Data Files
Two surveys were fielded in 2019 as part of the National Household Education Surveys Program: the Early Childhood Program Participation survey (ECPP) and the Parent and Family Involvement in Education survey (PFI). Data files and documentation can be downloaded directly from the website. Data files are being released for each of the surveys and are being released with ASCII, SAS, SPSS, Stata, CSV, and R formats available.
1/28/2021
NCES 2021030 National Household Education Surveys Program of 2019 Data File User's Manual
The 2019 National Household Education Surveys Program (NHES:2019) Data File User’s Manual provides documentation and guidance for users of the NHES:2019 data files, which include data from the Early Childhood Program Participation survey and the Parent and Family Involvement in Education survey. The survey program collected information about early childhood care, parental involvement in education, school choice, homeschooling, online learning, and home learning activities. Data files are being released for each survey, with ASCII, SAS, SPSS, Stata, csv, and R formats available.
1/27/2021
REL 2021034 Are Neighborhood Factors Associated with the Quality of Early Childhood Education in North Carolina?
The purpose of this study was to examine whether and how geographic, demographic, and socioeconomic characteristics of the neighborhood (that is, census tract) in which an early childhood education (ECE) site is located within North Carolina is associated with aspects of the quality of these sites, as characterized by their 2017 Quality Rating and Improvement System (QRIS) measures. The study used data on 5,254 licensed early childhood sites from numerous publicly-available data sources, including the North Carolina Division of Child Development and Early Education, the American Community Survey, and the National Center for Education Statistics. The strength of association between neighborhood characteristics and quality rating scores among ECE sites was determined using multilevel structural equation modeling to account for the way in which ECE sites are nested within neighborhoods. After taking into consideration characteristics of the ECE sites themselves, the nature of the neighborhood did not help further explain why some sites earned higher quality rating scores than other sites. Findings suggest that geographic location and the socio-demographic characteristics of a neighborhood need not be seen as impediments to providing or ensuring access to higher quality ECE, as represented by higher scores on the states’ QRIS measures. Neighborhood-related predictors, such as socioeconomic characteristics, were only weakly associated with the quality rating scores. Moreover, the analyses also indicated that high-quality sites are available in most neighborhoods in the state. Some site-level variables, such as accepting child care subsidies and the age groups served by the site, were associated with quality rating scores among ECE sites. Sites that served fewer different age groups had higher quality rating scores, on average. More research is needed to understand what characteristics of sites, and their contexts, may best predict whether an ECE site will be of higher or lower quality.
10/23/2020
NCES 2020123 Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 2010-11, Third-Grade, Fourth-Grade, and Fifth-Grade Psychometric Report
This report describes the design, development, administration, quality control procedures, and psychometric characteristics of the direct and indirect child assessment instruments used to measure the knowledge, skills, and development of young children participating in the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 2010–11 (ECLS-K:2011) in the in the third-, fourth-, and fifth-grade data collections. The focus of this volume is the seventh through ninth rounds of data collection: the spring 2014, spring 2105, and spring 2016 rounds.
3/30/2020
NCES 2020009 Digest of Education Statistics, 2018
The 54th in a series of publications initiated in 1962, the Digest's purpose is to provide a compilation of statistical information covering the broad field of education from prekindergarten through graduate school. The Digest contains data on a variety of topics, including the number of schools and colleges, teachers, enrollments, and graduates, in addition to educational attainment, finances, and federal funds for education, libraries, and international comparisons.
12/24/2019
NCES 2019059 Data File User's Manual for the National Household Education Surveys Program of 2016: Supplementary Geocode Files for the Parent and Family Involvement in Education Survey, Early Childhood Program Participation Survey, and Adult Training and Education Survey
This Data File User's Manual contains documentation about the purpose and contents of restricted-use data files that include additional geographic information for the three 2016 National Household Education Surveys Program (NHES:2016) surveys: the Early Childhood Program Participation (ECPP) Survey, the Parent and Family Involvement in Education (PFI) Survey, and the Adult Training and Education Survey (ATES). Variables are drawn from administrative and survey data from NCES and other federal agencies (primarily data from the Census Bureau) to expand the analytic utility of NHES:2016 data. The supplementary data include geographic identifiers down to the census block group and identifiers for a child’s assigned public school district. The files also include measures based on radii around a respondent’s home for access to different education programs and schools. While additional geographic characteristic information is provided, the data support estimates of national-level characteristics and not subnational geographies like states or specific localities. The additional geocode data can be used to produce nationally representative estimates or national-level subgroup analyses such as schooling experiences of students living in low-population density areas with high employment rates across the U.S. but not schooling experiences of students in a specific rural area.
11/4/2019
NCES 2019060 National Household Education Surveys Program of 2016: Supplementary Geocode Files for the Parent and Family Involvement in Education Survey, Early Childhood Program Participation Survey, and Adult Training and Education Survey
National Household Education Surveys Program of 2016: Supplementary Restricted-Use Geocode Data for the Parent and Family Involvement in Education, Early Childhood Program Participation, and Adult Training and Education Surveys are available through an NCES restricted-use data license. Variables are drawn from administrative and survey data from NCES and other federal agencies (primarily data from the Census Bureau) to expand the analytic utility of NHES:2016 data. The supplementary data include geographic identifiers down to the census block group and identifiers for a child’s assigned public school district. The files also include measures based on radii around a respondent’s home for access to different education programs and schools. While additional geographic characteristic information is provided, the data support estimates of national-level characteristics and not subnational geographies like states or specific localities. The additional geocode data can be used to produce nationally representative estimates or national-level subgroup analyses such as schooling experiences of students living in low-population density areas with high employment rates across the U.S. but not schooling experiences of students in a specific rural area.
11/4/2019
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