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Search Results: (16-30 of 41 records)

 Pub Number  Title  Date
NFES 2012809 Forum Guide to Supporting Data Access for Researchers: A State Education Agency Perspective
The Forum Guide to Supporting Data Access for Researchers: A State Education Agency Perspective recommends policies, practices, and templates that can be adopted and adapted by SEAs as they consider how to most effectively respond to requests for data about the education enterprise, including data maintained in longitudinal data systems. These recommendations reflect sound principles for managing the flow of data requests, establishing response priorities, monitoring appropriate use, protecting privacy, and ensuring that research efforts are beneficial to the education agency as well as the research community.
7/10/2012
REL 2012023 How California's Local Education Agencies Evaluate Teachers and Principals
This REL West Technical Brief, How California's local education agencies evaluate teachers and principals, summarizes the results of a statewide survey of teacher and principal evaluation practices across school districts and direct-funded charter schools in California. Key findings include:
  • Sixty-one percent of responding local education agencies indicated that their teacher evaluation systems are based on the California Standards for the Teaching Profession.
  • For teacher evaluation, 57 percent of respondents reported using student achievement outcomes or growth data as partial or primary evidence. For principal evaluation, 79 percent reported using these data.
  • Eighty-two percent of responding direct-funded charter schools reported using student achievement or growth data as partial or primary evidence for teacher evaluation, compared with 45 percent of districts. For principal evaluation, the figures were 85 percent of charter schools and 76 percent of districts.
  • More than two-thirds of local education agencies reported having two or three performance rating levels for their teachers (37 percent had two levels, and 35 percent had three) and principals (40 percent had two levels, and 30 percent had three). Local education agencies with two rating levels reported that 98 percent of teachers and 83 percent of principals were rated in the highest category; agencies with three rating levels reported that 91 percent of teachers and 98 percent of principals were rated in the highest category.
4/27/2012
REL 2012021 Prekindergarten Participation Rates in West Virginia
This report compares the shares of preK seats provided by public school systems and collaborative partners—federal or private—and analyzes participation based on socioeconomic and racial/ethnic subgroups and district characteristics. This report updates through 2010/11 a previous report that covered school years 2002/03–2006/07.

The study found that the statewide participation rate in preK more than doubled between 2002/03 and 2010/11, from 26 percent to 63 percent of eligible students.
4/26/2012
REL 2012025 Analyzing Performance by Pennsylvania Grade 8 Hispanic Students on the 2007/08 State Assessment
The report compares performance of grade 8 Hispanic students on the Pennsylvania System of School Assessment (PSSA) English language arts and math tests with that of grade 8 White, Black, and other non-Hispanic students during school years 2002/03 to 2008/09. It also examines how grade 8 Hispanic students’ performance varies by key student and school characteristics. The study found that in 2007/08, Hispanic students in Pennsylvania had lower English language arts and math scores than did non-Hispanic students. The differences were statistically significant.
4/25/2012
REL 2012024 English Language Learner Enrollment in Appalachia Region States
This technical brief describes English language learner student enrollment across school districts in the four REL Appalachia Region states (Kentucky, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia) for 2005/06–2008/09, updating an earlier report covering 1998/99–2004/05. The current brief expands on the earlier report by looking at data by grade span (kindergarten, 1–3, 4–6, 7–8, 9–12) and by geographic locale (city, suburb, town, rural).
3/29/2012
REL 2012020 Updating a Searchable Database of Dropout Prevention Programs and Policies in Nine Low-Income Urban School Districts in the Northeast and Islands Region
This technical brief describes updates to a database of dropout prevention programs and policies in 2006/07 created by the Regional Education Laboratory (REL) Northeast and Islands and described in the Issues & Answers report, Piloting a searchable database of dropout prevention programs in nine low-income urban school districts in the Northeast and Islands Region (Myint-U et al. 2009). To update the database, a key informant from each of the nine pilot districts was interviewed on the status and characteristics of the dropout prevention pro-grams and policies in 2010/11. Based on this new information, this brief classifies programs and policies as new, discontinued, or sustained since 2006/07, the years in which programs were included in the database (Myint-U et al. 2009). The term active is used to refer to the combination of new and sustained programs and policies—that is, all programs and policies being implemented in 2010/11.
2/9/2012
REL 2012018 How Prepared are Subgroups of Texas Students for College-Level Reading? Applying a Lexile®-Based Approach
Many students graduate from high school unprepared for the rigorous reading required in entry-level college and career work. This brief builds on a recent report (Wilkins et al. 2010) that used the Lexile measure (a method for measuring the reading difficulty of prose text and the reading capability of individuals) to estimate the proportion of Texas grade 11 public school students in 2009 ready for entry-level college reading in English. The previous study examined the overall grade 11 Texas student population; this brief uses the same methodol-ogy to present similar readiness estimates for student subgroups as defined by 10 character-istics that Texas uses for its state accountability system. An Excel® tool was created to enable school administrators to more easily compare the preparation of grade 11 students to read entry-level English textbooks from University of Texas (UT) system schools with that of stu-dents overall or selected subgroups of students statewide.
1/31/2012
REL 2012019 Comparing Achievement Trends in Reading and Math Across Arizona Public School Student Subgroups
This technical brief examines the 2008/09 reading and math proficiency levels of four categories of Arizona public school students (comprising 11 student subgroups): ethnicity (American Indian, Asian, Black, Hispanic, and White), English language learner status (English language learner students and non–English language learner students), disability status (students with disabilities and students without disabilities), and economic status (receiving free or reduced-price meals and not receiving free or reduced-price meals). Responding to an Arizona Department of Education request, the brief describes how student subgroup performance differs by school level (elementary, middle, and high) and across three school types: Title I Schools in Improvement (schools serving economically disadvantaged students and participating in the federal school improvement program intended to improve academic performance in schools not meeting adequate yearly progress for at least two consecutive years); Title I Schools Not in Improvement; and non–Title I schools. The same analyses were conducted for charter schools.
10/25/2011
REL 2011017 Achievement Trends of Schools and Students in Arizona’s Title I School Improvement Program
This technical brief responds to an Arizona Department of Education request to study academic performance in schools receiving funding through the federal Title I compensatory education program, the section of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 governing resources for schools and districts serving disadvantaged populations. The brief describes for 2005/06-2008/09 the numbers and distribution of Arizona public schools and students across school levels (elementary, middle, high) for three school types: Title I Schools in Improvement (participating in the school improvement program, a public program to improve the academic performance of students in schools not meeting adequate yearly progress for at least two consecutive years); Title I Schools Not in Improvement; and non-Title I schools. It reports how Schools in Improvement are distributed across school improvement statuses, compares trends in reading and math proficiency for students attending each school type, and examines patterns of movement in and out of school improvement among Title I schools.
7/19/2011
REL 2011016 Projected School Administrator Needs through 2017/2018 in California: The Effects of Projected Retirement and Projected Changes in Student Enrollment over Two-Year Increments
This technical brief projects the need for new school-site administrators (principals and vice-principals) in California by region in two-year increments over 2010/11–2017/18. It builds on an earlier Regional Educational Laboratory West report that projected the aggregate need for school administrators over 2008/09–2017/18 based on projected retirement and projected changes in student enrollment (White, Fong, and Makkonen 2010). Both studies divide the state into 11 regions, and both report projected demand for local administrators as a change from the 2007/08 baseline workforce. By disaggregating the study period into two-year increments, this brief provides more specific data for education organizations—particularly the Association of California School Administrators and the California County Superintendents Educational Services Association—to more accurately target workforce planning and training programs for new school-site administrators.
3/9/2011
REL 2010015 Where Do English Language Learner Students Go to School? Student Distribution By Language Proficiency in Arizona
Research suggests several circumstances in which a school may face greater challenges in effectively teaching its English Language Learner (ELL) students and in closing the achievement gap between ELL students and those who are native English speakers: if it has high concentrations of ELL students; if it has many socioeconomically disadvantaged students; or if it is located in an urban or rural, as opposed to suburban, area. Research also suggests that an open-enrollment program in a district may increase the concentrations of both ELL and socioeconomically disadvantaged students in some schools. This technical brief analyzes Arizona's 2007/08 student-level data to determine how concentrations of ELL students vary across its schools and vary by the school characteristics listed above.
8/30/2010
REL 2010014 Updated Multistate Review of Professional Teaching Standards
States update their teaching standards on an ongoing basis and can learn from other states' efforts. For example the "Updated multistate review of professional teaching standards" by REL West, adds to their previous 2009 review of teaching standards by offering options for broad consideration that include — structure and target groups of teachers, as well as ways of addressing special populations and use of technology — from six of the largest states in the nation.
4/26/2010
REL 2009013 Snapshots of Indiana's Full-Day Kindergarten Programs Before and After the State's Funding Increase for the Program
The Indiana General Assembly increased the state grant funds for full-day kindergarten from $8.5 million for 2006/07 to $33.5 million for 2007/08. Following the increase in funding, the Indiana Department of Education and the Indiana State Board of Education requested assistance from Regional Educational Laboratory Midwest to analyze Indiana administrative data so that the agencies could report to the legislature on changes in full-day kindergarten enrollment and funding. This technical brief describes Indiana’s full-day kindergarten enrollment patterns before and after the legislation (in 2006/07 and 2007/08) both in the state at large and in individual school corporations (equivalent to school districts) for all kindergarten students and disaggregated by student and school characteristics.
7/20/2009
REL TR00708 Aligning Mathematics Assessment Standards: Texas and the 2009 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP)
This Technical Brief examines the alignment between the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) mathematics assessment standards and the 2009 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) mathematics framework. It looks at the extent to which current state assessment standards cover the content on which 2009 NAEP assessments will be based. Applying the methodology used by Regional Educational Laboratory Southwest in 2007 in a similar study that examined the alignment of TAKS science assessment standards with the 2009 NAEP, this study presents results for areas of full alignment, partial alignment, nonalignment, and areas where the TAKS assessment standards go beyond the NAEP standards. The study finds that 74 percent of the NAEP grade 4, 81 percent of the NAEP grade 8, and 71 percent of the NAEP grade 12 assessment standards are either fully or partially addressed by the TAKS assessment standards.
10/28/2008
REL TR00808 Aligning Mathematics Assessment Standards: Arkansas and the 2009 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP)
This Technical Brief examines the current alignment between the Arkansas Comprehensive Testing, Assessment, and Accountability Program (ACTAAP) mathematics assessment standards and the 2009 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) mathematics framework. It looks at the extent to which current state assessment standards cover the content on which 2009 NAEP assessments will be based. Applying the methodology used by Regional Educational Laboratory Southwest in 2007 in a similar study that examined the alignment of ACTAAP science assessment standards with the 2009 NAEP, this study presents results for areas of full alignment, partial alignment, nonalignment, and areas where the ACTAAP assessment standards go beyond the NAEP standards. The study finds that 78 percent of NAEP grade 4, 84 percent of NAEP grade 8, and 72 percent of NAEP grade 12 assessment standards are either fully or partially addressed by the ACTAAP assessment standards.
10/28/2008
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