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Search Results: (16-30 of 86 records)

 Pub Number  Title  Date
WWC QREI0312 Quick Review of the Report “Exercise Improves Executive Function and Achievement and Alters Brain Activation in Overweight Children: A Randomized, Controlled Trial”
This randomized, controlled trial examined whether exercise offered to sedentary, overweight children ages 7 to 11 improved executive function—defined as strategy execution when presented with a novel task—and academic performance in reading and math.
3/13/2012
WWC QRGF0312 Quick Review of “Gathering Feedback for Teachers: Combining High-Quality Observations with Student Surveys and Achievement Gains”
This study examined five instruments used to assess the effectiveness of teacher practices based on classroom observations. The study first examined whether observers could reliably assess teachers with each instrument, and then examined how well each instrument, along with other information, predicted student achievement.
3/1/2012
WWC QRLT0312 Quick Review of "The Long-Term Impacts of Teachers: Teacher Value-Added and Student Outcomes in Adulthood"
This study examined whether being taught by a teacher with a high "value-added" improves a student's long-term outcomes. The study analyzed more than 20 years of data for nearly one million fourth- through eighth-grade students in a large urban school district.
3/1/2012
WWC QRIB0212 WWC Reviews Study of My Teaching Partner Program
The study, An Interaction-Based Approach to Enhancing Secondary School Instruction and Student Achievement, examined the effects of the MTP-S program on student achievement. Researchers compared test scores of students taught by teachers randomly assigned to receive MTP-S with those of students taught by teachers who received regular in-service training. The study analyzed data from two student cohorts. The first cohort included about 1,300 students whose test scores were analyzed at the end of the intervention year, while teachers received the MTP-S program. The second cohort included about 1,000 students whose test scores were analyzed at the end of the post-intervention year, when teachers were no longer receiving the program.
2/22/2012
WWC QRSB0212 WWC Quick Review of the Report "School-Based Early Childhood Education and Age-28 Well-Being: Effects by Timing, Dosage, and Subgroups"
The study examined the effect of an early childhood education program on educational attainment by age 28.
The study found positive, statistically significant differences on four outcomes related to educational attainment. Intervention group members completed 0.27 years more schooling, on average, than comparison group members. In addition, intervention group members were more likely to complete high school (82% versus 75%), graduate on time from high school (44% versus 37%), and attend a four-year college than comparison group members (15% versus 11%).
2/7/2012
WWC QRMS0212 WWC Quick Review of the Report “Middle School Mathematics Professional Development Impact Study: Findings After the Second Year of Implementation”
This randomized controlled trial examined whether a professional development program for seventh grade mathematics teachers improved the teachers' knowledge of rational number topics and the performance of their students on a rational number test.
2/7/2012
WWC QRTH0112 WWC Quick Review of the Report "Transforming the High School Experience: How New York City’s New Small Schools Are Boosting Student Achievement and Graduation Rates"
The study examined whether winning an admissions lottery for a small school of choice improved high school students' progress toward graduation and graduation rates.
1/31/2012
WWC QRLEPA11 WWC Quick Review of the Report “The Effectiveness of a Program to Accelerate Vocabulary Development in Kindergarten”
The Effectiveness of a Program to Accelerate Vocabulary Development in Kindergarten is a study that examined whether exposure to the vocabulary program Kindergarten PAVEd for Success improved expressive vocabulary of kindergartners. The study analyzed data for nearly 1,300 kindergarten students in 64 schools serving predominantly rural and high poverty youth in the Mississippi Delta region and surrounding areas. At each school, the study followed the achievement of a random sample of 10 students in two randomly selected classrooms. The researchers found that kindergarten students in schools using Kindergarten PAVEd for Success as a supplement to regular literacy instruction performed better on expressive vocabulary than kindergarten students in control schools. The authors reported that students who received Kindergarten PAVEd for Success instruction were one month ahead in vocabulary development at the end of kindergarten compared with students in the control group. The study is a well-implemented randomized controlled trial that meets WWC evidence standards.
12/6/2011
WWC QRCS0911 WWC Quick Review of the Report "Charter School Performance in Indiana"
Charter School Performance in Indiana is a study examining the effect of charter school attendance on annual student achievement growth in math and reading. The study analyzed data from a large sample of students in grades 4 through 9 in Indiana from 2004 to 2008. The authors matched charter school students to similar students attending traditional public schools based on test scores and demographic characteristics. The study found that charter school students’ annual math score growth and annual reading test score growth was slightly higher than a group of similar students attending traditional public schools. The study also found that, in general, charter school students with reading and math scores in the bottom half of the achievement distribution the previous year had significantly higher gains than their comparison counterparts. The research meets WWC research standards with reservations because the charter school students may have differed from the matched traditional public school students in ways not controlled for in the analysis.
9/27/2011
WWC QRRPST0611 WWC Quick Review: Measuring the Effect of the Retrieval Practice Studying Technique
The WWC quick review of "Retrieval Practice Produces More Learning than Elaborative Studying with Concept Mapping" examines a study on whether using the retrieval practice studying technique improved student learning of a science text more than study-once, repeated-study or concept mapping. The study compared outcomes for 80 undergraduates at Purdue University asked to read a 276-word passage and then randomly assigned to use one of the four studying techniques. The study found that students using the retrieval practice technique scored significantly higher than students using the study-once, repeated-study, or concept mapping technique. The average percent of correct test questions for each group was 67% for retrieval practice, 27% for study-once, 49% for repeated-study, and 45% for concept mapping. The WWC rated the research described in this report as meeting WWC evidence standards. The study’s design is equivalent to a well-implemented randomized control trial.
6/28/2011
WWC QREE0412 WWC quick review of the report "Achievement Effects of Four Early Elementary School Math Curricula"
The WWC quick review of the report "Achievement Effects of Four Early Elementary School Math Curricula" examines a study on the relative effectiveness of four early elementary school math curricula: Investigations in Number, Data, and Space; Math Expressions; Saxon Math; and Scott Foresman-Addison Wesley Mathematics. Participating schools were randomly assigned to use one of the four curricula, with a random sample of approximately 10 students per classroom included in the analysis. Overall, the study analyzes data on more than 8,000 first- and second-grade students in 110 schools in 12 districts in 10 states. The study measured the relative effects of the four curricula by comparing end-of-year test scores on a nationally normed math assessment developed for the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study–Kindergarten (ECLS–K) for first-graders and on a similar assessment adapted for this study for second-graders. The authors found no statistically significant differences among the curricula for first-graders after adjusting results for multiple curricula comparisons within the same analysis. For second-graders, one difference was statistically significant after taking multiple comparisons into account: Second-grade students attending Saxon Math schools scored 0.17 standard deviations higher than students attending Scott Foresman-Addison Wesley Mathematics schools, roughly equivalent to moving students from the 50th to the 57th percentile. The WWC rated the research described in this report as meeting WWC evidence standards, adding that the study was a well-implemented randomized controlled trial.
4/12/2011
WWC QRTP0405 WWC Quick Review of the Report "Teacher Pay for Performance: Experimental Evidence From the Project on Incentives in Teaching"
The WWC quick review of the report "Teacher Pay for Performance: Experimental Evidence From the Project on Incentives in Teaching" examines a study on whether offering financial incentives to teachers of fifth- through eighth-grade math students improves their students' performance on the math section of the Tennessee Comprehensive Assessment Program. Approximately half of the participating math teachers were randomly assigned to a group that was offered financial incentives linked to their students’ math achievement growth. The other half was assigned to a group not offered these incentives. Overall, the study found that students with math teachers who were offered financial incentives performed no better or worse than students with teachers who were not offered incentives. The WWC does not consider these results to be conclusive because the groups of students compared may have differed before the intervention. The WWC rated the research described in this report as not meeting WWC evidence standards.
4/5/2011
WWC QRDCSF0308 Quick Review of the Report "Evaluation of the DC Opportunity Scholarship Program: Final Report"
The WWC quick review of the report "Evaluation of the DC Opportunity Scholarship Program: Final Report" examines a study on whether winning a lottery for the Opportunity Scholarship Program, which offers vouchers to students to attend private schools, improved low-income students' reading and math achievement and their probability of graduating from high school. Key outcomes were reading and math achievement on standardized tests for the full sample and, for a subset of 500 students scheduled to complete 12th grade by spring 2009, parent reports on whether their children earned a high school diploma. The study found that winning a lottery for a private school scholarship did not have statistically significant effects on reading and math achievement. However, students who won the scholarship lottery were significantly more likely to graduate from high school: 82% for the group that won the lottery compared with 70% for the group that lost the lottery, an effect size of 0.26. Similar results were found for the subset of students attending schools designated as “in need of improvement” under the No Child Left Behind Act when they applied for a scholarship. Winning the lottery did not have a statistically significant effect on reading or math achievement, but it increased the likelihood of high school graduation from 66% to 79%, an effect size of 0.28. The WWC rated the research described in this report as meeting WWC evidence standards. This study was equivalent to a randomized controlled trial because the groups of students contrasted in the study were formed by lottery.
3/8/2011
WWC QRHS1214 WWC Quick Review of the Report "Head Start Impact Study: Final Report"
Head Start Impact Study: Final Report— examined the effects of offering Head Start to 3- and 4-year-olds. The study analyzed data on about 4,700 preschool-aged children who applied for enrollment for the 2002–03 program- year, at one of about 380 Head Start centers randomly selected for the study, and followed the students through first grade. The study compared the outcomes of children who were offered enrollment in Head Start to the outcomes of children who were not offered enrollment. School-readiness outcomes, which are the focus of this quick review, were measured using standardized cognitive assessments of language and literacy, pre-writing, and math skills administered at the end of each year through first grade. This quick review has been updated with a revised WWC study rating based on additional attrition and baseline equivalence information provided by the authors. With regard to effectiveness at the first follow-up, the study found that children offered the chance to enroll in Head Start as 3-year-olds had higher scores on four of eight measures of language and literacy, the single measure of pre-writing, and one of two measures of math skills, than children not offered enrollment as 3-year-olds. Children offered the chance to enroll in Head Start as 4-year-olds had higher scores on six of eight measures of language and literacy at the first follow-up than children not offered enrollment as 4-year-olds. There were no significant differences between the groups in pre-writing or math skills. WWC rated the first follow-up analysis as meets WWC evidence standards with reservations. Concerning effectiveness at the later follow-up, the study found no significant differences between the children offered and not offered the chance to enroll in Head Start as 3-year-olds on language and literacy, pre-writing, and math skills measured at the second, third, and fourth follow-ups. In addition, there were no significant differences between the children offered and not offered the chance to enroll in Head Start as 4-year-olds on language and literacy and math skills measured at the second and third follow-ups which corresponded to the ends of kindergarten and first grade, respectively. WWC's rating of the second, third and fourth follow-up analysis is meets WWC Evidence Standards.
12/14/2010
WWC QRRS1214 WWC Quick Review of the Report "The Role of Simplification and Information in College Decisions: Results From the H&R Block FAFSA Experiment"
The Role of Simplification and Information in College Decisions: Results From the H&R Block FAFSA Experiment—This study examined whether assistance in filling out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) increases the likelihood of filing the FAFSA, college enrollment, and financial aid receipt. The authors analyzed data on about 17,000 individuals in 156 H&R Block tax preparation offices in Ohio and North Carolina. It compares the outcomes of three research groups created through random assignment: a FAFSA treatment group; an information-only treatment group which received portions but not all of the FAFSA treatment; and a no-treatment control group. Each comparison was conducted for independent adults, both those with no previous college experience and those with some previous college experience, and dependent students—those who were high school seniors or recent high school graduates and financially dependent on their parents. The study rating in this WWC quick review has been revised to account for additional information on sample attrition provided by the study authors.
12/14/2010
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