Skip Navigation
Data
Point
U.S. Department of Education NCES 2021-054 June 2021
Teacher Requirements to Help Students Outside Regular School Hours in
2017–18

This Data Point examines whether teachers are required to help students with their academic or social and emotional needs outside regular school hours in public and private schools in the United States before the coronavirus pandemic. It uses data from the public and private school principal data fles of the 2017–18 National Teacher and Principal Survey (NTPS), which is a national sample survey of public and private K–12 schools, principals, and teachers in the 50 states and the District of Columbia. State-level estimates can also be produced for public schools, principals, and teachers.


Are teachers required to help students with their academic needs outside regular school hours? Does this vary for public and private schools?

In 2017–18, one-ffth of principals (20 percent) said that teachers in their school were required to help students with their academic needs outside regular school hours (FIGURE 1). This was more often required of teachers in private schools (28 percent) than in public schools (17 percent).

The diference between private and public schools was largely due to traditional public schools. There, 16 percent of teachers were required to give such support. Public charter schools1 (32 percent) were much more similar to private schools (28 percent) when it came to requiring teachers to help this way.

FIGURE 1. Help students with academic needs outside school hours: Percentage of public and private school principals reporting that teachers at their school are required to help students with their academic needs outside regular school hours, by school type: 2017–18

FIGURE 1. Help students with academic needs outside school hours: Percentage of public and private school principals
reporting that teachers at their school are required to help students with their academic needs outside regular school
hours, by school type: 2017–18

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, National Teacher and Principal Survey (NTPS), “Public School Principal and Private School Principal Data Files,” 2017–18.

Among private schools, teachers in Catholic schools (37 percent) were required to provide this type of academic help more often than were teachers in other religious schools (26 percent) or nonsectarian schools2 (24 percent).

Are teachers required to help students with their social and emotional needs outside regular school hours? Does this vary for public and private schools?

Ten percent of principals said that teachers in their school were required to help students with their social and emotional needs outside regular school hours (FIGURE 2). As with academic support, this was more often required of teachers in private (20 percent) than public schools (8 percent).

FIGURE 2. Help students with social and emotional needs outside regular school hours: Percentage of public and private school principals reporting that teachers at their school are required to help students with their social and emotional needs outside regular school hours, by school type: 2017–18

FIGURE 2. Help students with social and emotional needs outside regular school hours: Percentage of public and private
school principals reporting that teachers at their school are required to help students with their social and emotional
needs outside regular school hours, by school type: 2017–18

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, National Teacher and Principal Survey (NTPS), “Public School Principal and Private School Principal Data Files,” 2017–18.

The diference between public and private schools for helping with social and emotional needs was largely due to the rate at which traditional public schools (7 percent) require this of teachers. This is similar to the pattern for academic needs. However, charter schools (15 percent) also report requiring social and emotional help at lower rates than private schools (20 percent). This is a diferent pattern than for academic needs.

There were no diferences across types of private schools in requiring teachers to help with social and emotional needs.

Endnotes

1 A charter school is a public school that, in accordance with an enabling state statute, has been granted a charter exempting it from selected state or local rules and regulations.
2 Nonsectarian schools are schools that are not religiously afliated.

To learn more, visit: https://nces.ed.gov/surveys/ntps/.
For questions about content or to view this report and supplemental tables online, go to https://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2021054.

The National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) Data Point presents information on education topics of current interest. It was authored by Soheyla Taie and Laurie Lewis of Westat. Estimates based on samples are subject to sampling variability, and apparent diferences may not be statistically signifcant. All stated diferences are statistically signifcant at the .05 level, with no adjustments for multiple comparisons. In the design, conduct, and data processing of NCES surveys, eforts are made to minimize the efects of nonsampling errors such as item nonresponse, measurement error, data processing error, or other systematic error.