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Data
Point
U.S. Department of Education NCES 2018-063 April 2018
Services to Support Parent Involvement by Community Type, Sector, and School Classification

The Principal Questionnaire was administered as part of the 201112 Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS), which is a nationally representative sample survey of public and private K12 schools, principals, and teachers in the 50 states and the District of Columbia. The selected samples include about 11,000 traditional and charter public schools and public school principals, and 3,000 private schools and their principals. This Data Point examines the relationship between services to support parent involvement, and community type, school sector, and school classification.1

FIGURE 1. Services to support parent involvement, by community type: 20112012

FIGURE 1. Services to support parent involvement, by community type: 20112012

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS), "Public School Principal and Private School Principal Data Files," 201112.

What is the relationship between community type and availability of services to support parent involvement?

Public and private school principals were asked to report whether their school had a staff member assigned to work on parent involvement; workshops or courses for parents or guardians; services to support parent participation such as providing child care or transportation; or a parent drop-in center or lounge.

Overall, higher percentages of principals reported having a staff member assigned to work on parent involvement (51 per-cent) and workshops available for parents (53 percent) than on drop-in centers for parents (17 percent) (figure 1).

Higher percentages of principals in city schools reported having a staff member assigned to work on parent involvement (63 percent), workshops for parents (67 percent), services to support parent involvement (51 percent), and drop-in centers for parents (26 percent) than other community types.

Compared to suburban schools, rural schools had lower percentages of principals who reported assigning a staff member to parent involvement (51 and 44 percent, respectively), having services for parents (42 and 31 percent), and offering a drop-in center for parents (17 and 11 percent).

There were differences across all community types in reports of workshops. The largest percentage of principals to report offering workshops for parents were those from city schools (67 percent), followed by principals from suburban schools (59 percent), town schools (46 percent), and rural schools (40 percent).

FIGURE 2. Services to Support Parent Involvement, by School Sector and Classification

FIGURE 2. Services to Support Parent Involvement, by School Sector and Classification:

! Interpret data with caution. Estimate is unstable due to high coefficient of variation.
SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS), "Public School Principal and Private School Principal Data Files," 201112.

What is the relationship between school classification by sector and services to support parent involvement?

Overall, higher percentages of all public school principals reported having a staff member assigned to work on parent involvement (55 percent), workshops for parents (57 percent), and a drop-in center for parents (18 percent) than all private school principals (38, 40, and 12 percent, respectively) (figure 2).

A higher percentage of charter school principals reported having a staff member assigned to work on parent involvement (68 percent) than principals at traditional public schools (54 percent).

Comparing across types of private schools, higher percentages of principals in nonsectarian schools reported having a staff member for parent involvement (49 percent), workshops (56 percent), and drop-in centers (19 percent) than principals in Catholic or other religious schools (33 and 35 percent, 44 and 29 percent, and 5 and 11 percent, respectively).

A lower percentage of principals in Catholic schools (5 percent) reported having drop-in centers than principals at other religious schools (11 percent), while a higher percentage reported having workshops available to parents (44 and 29 percent, respectively).

Endnotes

1 Community type is defined by the urbancentric school locale code based on the 2010 Decennial Census data, collapsed into four categories: city, suburban, town, and rural. School sector refers to whether a school is a public school or a private school.

School classification refers to characteristics within a sector, in particular, whether a public school is a traditional public school or a charter school, or whether a private school is a Catholic school, affiliated with another religion, or nonsectarian.

Data in this report are from the 201112 Schools and Staffing Survey. To learn more, visit https://nces.ed.gov/surveys/sass. For questions about content or to download additional copies, go to https://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch.

This National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) Data Point presents information on education topics of current interest. It was authored by Abigail Quirk of the American Institutes for Research. Estimates based on samples are subject to sampling variability, and apparent differences may not be statistically significant. All stated differences are statistically significant at the .05 level. In the design, conduct, and data processing of NCES surveys, efforts are made to minimize effects of nonsampling errors, such as item response, measurement error, data processing error, or other systematic error.