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Dropout Rates in the United States: 2005
NCES 2007-059
June 2007

Figure 1.  Event dropout rates of 15- through 24-year-olds who dropped out of grades 1012, by family income: October 1972 through October 2005

Event dropout rates of 15- through 24-year-olds who dropped out of grades 1012, by family income: October 1972 through October 2005
NOTE: The event dropout rate indicates the percentage of youth ages 15 through 24 who dropped out of grades 10–12 in the 12 months between one October and the next (e.g., October 2004 to October 2005). Dropping out is defined as leaving school without a high school diploma or equivalent credential (for example, a General Educational Development certificate). Low income is defined as the bottom 20 percent of all family incomes for the year; middle income is between 20 and 80 percent of all family incomes; and high income is the top 20 percent of all family incomes. Data on family income are missing for 1974. Estimates beginning with 1987 reflect new editing procedures for cases with missing data on school enrollment items. Estimates beginning with 1992 reflect new wording of the educational attainment item. Estimates beginning with 1994 reflect changes due to newly instituted computer–assisted interviewing. For details about changes in CPS over time, please see Kaufman, Alt, and Chapman (2004).
SOURCE: U.S. Department of Commerce, Census Bureau, Current Population Survey (CPS), October (1972–2005).

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