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 Pub Number  Title  Date
NCES 2008346 Education Longitudinal Study of 2002/06: Restricted Use Second Follow-up Data Files, Data File Documentation, and Electronic Codebook System
This ELS:2002/2004 CDROM contains a revised version of the restricted-use base-year to second follow-up data that were previously released. Manuals documenting the sample design of these data, how they were collected, and how they should be used are included. This documentation is public use and can be downloaded directly from the ELS website (http://nces.ed.gov/surveys/els2002 /manuals.asp).

The ELS:2002 longitudinal study is designed to monitor a national sample of young people as they progress from tenth grade through high school and on to postsecondary education and/or the world of work. By the third follow-up in 2012, these young people will be in their mid-twenties.

Users of the original second follow-up restricted-use data (NCES 2008-346) can obtain this revised version (NCES 2008-346r) by requesting it from the IES Data Security Office (IESData.Security@ed.gov). Nearly all of the changes that have been made in the original data are in base year and first follow-up variables and not transcript or second follow-up variables.

However, none of these changes affect data that were originally released in the base year to first follow-up restricted-use data (NCES 2006-430 ), or the transcript restricted-use data (NCES-2006-351).
10/16/2007
NCES 2007164REV Differential Characteristics of 2-Year Postsecondary Institutions
Two-year institutions, including community colleges and career schools, have become increasingly important in American higher education. Many classification systems for 2-year institutions use a wide array of characteristics and perspectives to differentiate between 2-year institutions. This report uses a classification system for 2-year institutions that uses number of variables available on the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) to identify seven groups of 2-year institutions: small publics; medium-sized publics; large publics; allied health not-for-profits; other not-for-profits; degree-granting for-profits; and other for-profits. The report presents brief profiles for each classification type, then focuses on four broad topic areas (institutional resources, student characteristics, institutional affordability, and measures of student success) to highlight the key differences that set a particular institutional type apart. The analysis found that among public institutions, small and large institutions differed in key areas; for example, large public schools tended to offer lower tuition and more services and to be located in urban areas. Private for-profit schools appear quite similar to one another with the exception of the types of credentials offered and completed, which reflect the classification itself. In most other aspects---such as tuition, location, finances, student characteristics, and student financial aid---these institutions exhibited few differences. Other not-for-profits appeared to be similar to for-profits, but slightly more traditional. Allied health institutions differed from other not-for-profit institutions---and the other institutions in the classification system---in terms of the programs offered, funding streams, student characteristics, student costs and the types of awards granted. These schools appeared to be between public institutions and other private schools in terms of affordability and financial aid. Students at allied health institutions were more likely to be older, independent with dependents, and female than their counterparts at other 2-year schools.
8/10/2007
NCES 2007017 Digest of Education Statistics, 2006
The 42nd in a series of publications initiated in 1962, the Digest’s primary purpose is to provide a compilation of statistical information covering the broad field of American education from prekindergarten through graduate school. The Digest contains data on a variety of topics, including the number of schools and colleges, teachers, enrollments, and graduates, in addition to educational attainment, finances, and federal funds for education, libraries, and international comparisons.
7/26/2007
NCES 2007165 Part-Time Undergraduates in Postsecondary Education: 2003–04
This report uses data from the 2003–04 National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS:2004) to profile part-time undergraduates enrolled in U.S. postsecondary institutions in 2003–04. About 49 percent of undergraduates were enrolled exclusively full time in the 2003–04 academic year, 35 percent were enrolled exclusively part time, and 16 percent had mixed enrollment intensity. Part-time undergraduates, especially exclusively part-time students, were at a distinct disadvantage relative to those who were enrolled full time: they came from minority and low-income family backgrounds; they were not as well-prepared for college as their full-time peers; they were highly concentrated in 2-year colleges and nondegree/certificate programs; and many of them worked full time while enrolled and were not enrolled continuously. Using longitudinal data from the 1996/01 Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study (BPS:96/01), the report also found that part-time enrollment was negatively associated with persistence and degree completion six years after beginning postsecondary education even after controlling for a wide range of factors related to these outcomes. This was the case even for the group of students with characteristics that fit the typical profile of a full-time student (i.e., age 23 or younger, financially dependent on parents, graduated from high school with a regular diploma, and received financial help from parents to pay for postsecondary education). Regardless of whether they resembled full-time students, part-time students (especially exclusively part-time students) lagged behind their full-time peers in terms of their postsecondary outcomes even after controlling for a variety of related factors.
6/27/2007
NCES 2006158 2003–04 National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS:04): Undergraduate Financial Aid Estimates for 12 States: 2003–04
This E.D. TAB presents selected findings about the price of attendance and the types and amounts of financial aid received by in-state undergraduates enrolled in public 2-year, public 4-year, and private not-for-profit 4-year institutions during the 2003–04 academic year in 12 selected states. It is based on the undergraduate data in the 2003–04 National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS:04), a nationally representative survey of postsecondary students. In addition to providing national estimates, the NPSAS:04 survey was designed to provide representative samples of undergraduates in public 2-year, public 4-year, and private not-for-profit 4-year institutions in 12 states: California, Connecticut, Delaware, Georgia, Indiana, Illinois, Minnesota, Nebraska, New York, Oregon, Texas, and Tennessee. Prior NPSAS studies have not been representative at the state level. For the in-state undergraduates in each of these 12 selected states, the tables in this E.D. TAB show the average tuition and fees and total price of attendance, the percentages of undergraduates receiving various types of financial aid and the average amounts received, the average net price of attendance after financial aid, average financial need and remaining need after financial aid, cumulative student loan amounts, earnings from work while enrolled, and other aspects of financing an undergraduate education. Tables of comparable national totals limited to in-state undergraduates in public 2-year, public 4-year, and private not-for-profit 4-year institutions in the 50 states, DC, and Puerto Rico are also provided to allow for comparisons of undergraduate financing patterns in each of the 12 selected states and the entire nation.
10/24/2006
NCES 2006030 Digest of Education Statistics, 2005
The 41st in a series of publications initiated in 1962, the Digest’s primary purpose is to provide a compilation of statistical information covering the broad field of American education from prekindergarten through graduate school. The Digest contains data on a variety of topics, including the number of schools and colleges, teachers, enrollments, and graduates, in addition to educational attainment, finances, and federal funds for education, libraries, and international comparisons. Some examples of highlights from the report include the following items. Enrollment in public elementary and secondary schools rose 22 percent between 1985 and 2005. The fastest public school growth occurred in the elementary grades (prekindergarten through grade 8), where enrollment rose 24 percent over this period, from 27.0 million to 33.5 million. Public secondary school enrollment declined 8 percent from 1985 to 1990, but then rose 31 percent from 1990 to 2005, for a net increase of 20 percent. The number of public school teachers has risen faster than the number of students over the past 10 years, resulting in declines in the pupil/teacher ratio. Between 1994 and 2004, the number of full-time college students increased by 30 percent compared to an 8 percent increase in part-time students. During the same time period, the number of men enrolled rose 16 percent, while the number of women enrolled increased by 25 percent.
8/10/2006
NCES 2006614 Education Statistics Quarterly-Vol. 7 Issues 1&2
The Quarterly offers a comprehensive overview of work done across all of NCES. Each issue includes short publications and summaries covering all NCES publications and data products released in a given time period as well as notices about training and funding opportunities. In addition, each issue includes a featured topic with invited commentary, and a note on the topic from NCES.
1/17/2006
NCES 2006005 Digest of Education Statistics, 2004
The Digest of Education Statistics provides a compilation of statistical information covering the broad field of education from prekindergarten through graduate school. Topics in the Digest include: the number of schools and colleges; teachers; enrollments; graduates; educational attainment; finances; federal funds for education; employment and income of graduates; libraries; technology; and international comparisons.
10/12/2005
NCES 2005152 Waiting to Attend College: Undergraduates Who Delay Their Postsecondary Enrollment
This report describes the characteristics and outcomes of students who delay enrollment in postsecondary education. It covers the ways in which the demographic, enrollment, and attendance patterns of students who delay postsecondary enrollment differ from their peers who enroll immediately after high school graduation. In addition, the report discusses how students who delay a shorter amount of time differ from those who delay longer. It is based on data from the 2000 National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS:2000), the 2000 follow-up of the National Longitudinal Study of 1988 (NELS:88/2000), and the 2001 follow-up of the Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study (BPS:96/01). Delayed entrants began their postsecondary education at a significant disadvantage compared to those who enrolled immediately after high school with regard to family income, parental education, academic preparation, time spent working while enrolled, and course of study. While only a quarter of those who delayed entry first enrolled in bachelor’s degree programs, over half of those who enrolled immediately did so. Further, 40 percent of delayed entrants earned some kind of postsecondary credential compared with 58 percent of immediate entrants.
6/16/2005
NCES 2005094 The Condition of Education 2005
The Condition of Education 2005 summarizes important developments and trends in education using the latest available data. The report presents 40 indicators on the status and condition of education and a special analysis of the mobility of elementary and secondary school teachers. The indicators represent a consensus of professional judgment on the most significant national measures of the condition and progress of education for which accurate data are available. The 2005 print edition includes 40 indicators in six main areas: (1) enrollment trends and student characteristics at all levels of the education system from elementary education to adult learning; (2) student achievement and the longer term, enduring effects of education; (3) student effort and rates of progress through the educational system among different population groups; (4) the contexts of elementary and secondary education in terms of courses taken, teacher characteristics, and other factors; (5) the contexts of postsecondary education; and (6) societal support for learning, including parental and community support for learning, and public and private financial support of education at all levels.
6/1/2005
NCES 2005157 The Road Less Traveled? Students Who Enroll in Multiple Institutions
This report profiles students who attended multiple institutions - specifically those who co-enrolled (attended more than one institution simultaneously), transferred, or attended 2-year institutions. It looks at the extent to which undergraduates attend multiple institutions as well as the relationship between student' rates of multiple institution attendance and their persistence, attainment, and time to degree. Analysis is based on data from the 1996-01 Beginning Postsecondary Student Study and the 2000-01 Baccalaureate and Beyond Longitudinal Study. The study found that attending more than one institution during the course of undergraduate enrollment is a common practice. Among students enrolling for the first time in 1995/96, 40 percent had attended more than one institution as of 2001, while among 1999/2000 college graduates, nearly 60 percent had done so.Among those same graduates, transferring and co-enrolling were associated with longer average times to completion.
5/31/2005
NCES 2005025 Digest of Education Statistics, 2003
The Digest of Education Statistics provides a compilation of statistical information covering the broad field of education from prekindergarten through graduate school. Topics in the Digest include: the number of schools and colleges; teachers; enrollments; graduates; educational attainment; finances; federal funds for education; employment and income of graduates; libraries; technology; and international comparisons.
12/30/2004
NCES 2004077 The Condition of Education 2004
The Condition of Education 2004 summarizes important developments and trends in education using the latest available data. The report presents 38 indicators on the status and condition of education and a special analysis of changes in student financial aid between 1989-90 and 1999-2000. The indicators represent a consensus of professional judgment on the most significant national measures of the condition and progress of education for which accurate data are available. The 2004 print edition includes 38 indicators in six main areas: (1) enrollment trends and student characteristics at all levels of the education system from elementary education to adult learning; (2) student achievement and the longer term, enduring effects of education; (3) student effort and rates of progress through the educational system among different population groups; (4) the contexts of elementary and secondary education in terms of courses taken, teacher characteristics, and other factors; (5) the contexts of postsecondary education; and (6) societal support for learning, including parental and community support for learning, and public and private financial support of education at all levels.
6/1/2004
NCES 2004401 CD-Rom: Postsecondary Education Transcript Study
This data file contains information from the postsecondary education transcripts for the NELS:88 respondents who earned higher education credits. This CD-Rom is often used with the NELS:88/2000 restricted use CD-Rom.
2/1/2004
NCES 19958001 The New College Course Map and Transcript Files: Changes in Course-Taking and Achievement, 1972-1993. Based on the Postsecondary Records from Two National Longitudinal Studies.
This document presents a national tapestry of what is studied where, and by whom, in U.S. colleges, community colleges, and postsecondary trade schools. The "Map" is based on empirical information from national samples of postsecondary transcripts in two national longitudinal studies, the National Longitudinal Study of the High School Class of 1972 (NLS-72) and the High School and Beyond/Sophomore Cohort (HSB/SO). The cohorts of the HSB/SO were scheduled to graduate from high school in 1982. Participation in postsecondary education expanded considerably during the period from 1972 to 1993, but the rate of completing any credentials by age 30 did not increase. The rate of bachelor's degree completion declined in the same period, as did the rate at which bachelor's degree recipients entered graduate or professional school. Time-to-degree increased by 7%, and the average number of credits earned by students also increased. The document has seven major sections: (1) "Making the Map," a description of the methodology; (2) "Degrees, Majors, Credits, and Time," a study of the long-term educational attainment of both cohorts; (3) "The Changing Shape of Delivered Knowledge," the taxonomy of courses derived from the samples; (4) "Who Provides?," the distribution of attempted courses by institution type; (5) "The Empirical Core Curriculum," a study of student course taking; (6) "Changes in the Proportion of Students Earning Undergraduate Credits in Specific Courses," an analysis of changes in student credits; and (7) "Undergraduate Grades: A Complex Story," the analysis of student achievement. Two appendixes contain technical notes and notes on data sources. (Contains 12 tables and 38 references.) (SLD)
4/21/1995
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