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 Pub Number  Title  Date
NCES 2010353 Teacher Attrition and Mobility: Results from the 2008-09 Teacher Follow-up Survey
This First Look report provides some selected findings from the 2008-09 Teacher Follow-up Survey (TFS) along with data tables and methodological information. The TFS is a follow-up of a sample of the elementary and secondary school teachers who participated in the previous year’s Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS). The TFS sample includes teachers who leave teaching in the year after the SASS data collection and those who continue to teach either in the same school as last year or in a different school. The purpose of the Teacher Follow-up Survey is to determine how many teachers remained at the same school, moved to another school or left the profession in the year following the SASS administration.
8/11/2010
REL 2009080 Methodologies Used by Midwest Region States for Studying Teacher Supply and Demand
This report describes how state education agencies in the Midwest Region monitor teacher supply, demand, and shortage; details why they monitor these data; and offers estimates of the monetary costs incurred in performing such studies.
9/28/2009
REL 2008057 Trends in California Teacher Demand: a County and Regional Perspective
The report highlights the differences among California's counties and regions in their use of underprepared teachers and their needs for new teachers in the coming decade as driven by projected student enrollment changes and teacher retirements. The findings show county and regional variations in key factors that influence teacher labor markets.
8/5/2008
NCES 2008153 Teacher Career Choices: Timing of Teacher Careers Among 1992-93 Bachelor's Degree Recipients
This report uses longitudinal data from the 1992-93 Baccalaureate and Beyond Study (B&B:93/03) to analyze the teaching career choices of 1992-93 bachelor's degree recipients. As of 2003, some 87 percent of graduates reported not teaching in 1994, 1997, and 2003 (nonteachers). Of the 13 percent of graduates who were teaching at one or more of the three follow-up interviews, 31 percent taught consistently, 41 percent were late starters, 16 percent were leavers, and 12 percent were other teachers. The report also provides an in-depth look at the teacher career choices of those graduates with various demographic characteristics, academic backgrounds, teaching assignments, and salaries. Among those who taught, graduates with dependents in each year (1993, 1997, and 2003) taught consistently at higher rates than graduates without dependents. Most graduates who taught consistently had majored in education for their bachelor's degree (77 percent). On the other hand, 40 percent of education majors were not teaching at the elementary/secondary level in 1994, 1997, or 2003. Many of the 1992-93 graduates who became teachers had earned a master's degree or higher by 2003 and had done so at higher rates than graduates who did not teach: 39 percent of graduates who taught had attained a master's degree or higher by 2003, compared with about one-quarter of those who did not teach. The results in this report may inform research on teacher supply and demand, teacher attrition, and teacher retention.
4/29/2008
NCES 2008309 2003-04 Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS) and 2004-05 Teacher Follow-up Survey (TFS) (CD ROM) Restricted-Use Data with Electronic Codebook
The restricted-use codebook contains the count of responses for each data item and all components of SASS in 2003-2004 and the 2004-2005 TFS. The TFS data and User's manual are the added features to this re-release of the 2003-2004 SASS restricted-use ECB.
10/31/2007
NCES 2007040 Status of Education in Rural America
This report presents a series of indicators on the status of education in rural America, using the new NCES locale classification system. The new system classifies the locale of school districts and schools based on their actual geographic coordinates into one of 12 locale categories and distinguishes between rural areas that are on the fringe of an urban area, rural areas that are at some distance, and rural areas that are remote. The findings of this report indicate that in 2003-04 over half of all operating school districts and one-third of all public schools in the United States were in rural areas; yet only one-fifth of all public school students were enrolled in rural areas. A larger percentage of public school students in rural areas than those in any other locale attended very small schools. A larger percentage of rural public school students in the 4th- and 8th-grades scored at or above the Proficient level on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) reading, mathematics, and science assessments in 2005 than did public school students in cities at these grade levels. However, smaller percentages of rural public school students than suburban public school students scored at or above the Proficient level in reading and mathematics. In 2004, the high school status dropout rate (i.e., the percentage of persons not enrolled in school and not having completed high school) among 16- to 24-year-olds in rural areas was higher than in suburban areas, but lower than in cities. Current public school expenditures per student were higher in rural areas in 2003-04 than in any other locale after adjusting for geographic cost differences. Racial/ethnic minorities account for a smaller percentage of public school teachers in rural schools than in schools in all other locales in 2003-04. In general, smaller percentages of public school teachers in rural areas than across the nation as a whole reported problems as “serious” and behavioral problems as frequent in their schools in 2003-04. Likewise, a larger percentage of public school teachers in rural areas than in other locales reported being satisfied with the teaching conditions in their school in 2003-04, though a smaller percentage of rural public school teachers than suburban public school teachers reported being satisfied with their salary. Public school teachers in rural areas earned less, on average, in 2003-04 than their peers in other locales, even after adjusting for geographic cost differences.
7/25/2007
NCES 2007349 Documentation for the 2004-05 Teacher Follow-up Survey
Technical documentation for the 2004-05 Teacher Follow-Up Survey, done one year after the 2003-04 Schools and Staffing Survey. The documentation covers the entire survey cycle--from sample design, questionnaire revisions, and field data collection through all stages of processing. There are descriptions and explanations of the survey cycle in the main text, supplemented by more detailed information in appendices.
3/19/2007
NCES 2007307 Teacher Attrition and Mobility: Results from the 2004-05 Teacher Follow-up Survey
This First Look report provides some selected findings from the 2004-05 Teacher Follow-up Survey (TFS) along with data tables and methodological information. The TFS is a follow-up of a sample of the elementary and secondary school teachers who participated in the previous year’s Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS). The TFS sample includes teachers who leave teaching in the year after the SASS data collection and those who continue to teach either in the same school as last year or in a different school. The purpose of the Teacher Follow-up Survey is to determine how many teachers remained at the same school, moved to another school or left the profession in the year following the SASS administration.
2/6/2007
NCES 2005114 Findings from the Condition of Education 2005: Mobility in the Teacher Workforce
This report contains a special analysis that is republished from the Condition of Education 2005 in a booklet form. The analysis compares teacher transitions into and out of the workforce and within the workforce in 1999-2000 with those in 1987-88, 1990-91, and 1993-94.
8/16/2005
NCES 2005094 The Condition of Education 2005
The Condition of Education 2005 summarizes important developments and trends in education using the latest available data. The report presents 40 indicators on the status and condition of education and a special analysis of the mobility of elementary and secondary school teachers. The indicators represent a consensus of professional judgment on the most significant national measures of the condition and progress of education for which accurate data are available. The 2005 print edition includes 40 indicators in six main areas: (1) enrollment trends and student characteristics at all levels of the education system from elementary education to adult learning; (2) student achievement and the longer term, enduring effects of education; (3) student effort and rates of progress through the educational system among different population groups; (4) the contexts of elementary and secondary education in terms of courses taken, teacher characteristics, and other factors; (5) the contexts of postsecondary education; and (6) societal support for learning, including parental and community support for learning, and public and private financial support of education at all levels.
6/1/2005
NCES 2005335 1999-2000 Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS) and 2000-01 Teacher Follow-up Survey (TFS) CD-ROM: Public-Use Data with Electronic Codebook
This updated public-use electronic codebook contains frequency counts of responses for each data item and most respondents from the 2000-01 Teacher Follow-up Survey, in addition to the previously released 1999-2000 SASS data. Copies of the 1999-2000 SASS questionnaires are available at: http://nces.ed.gov/surveys/SASS/question9900.asp; see the Online Availability for the TFS questionnaires.
4/1/2005
NCES 2004325 Developments in School Finance: 2003
This report contains papers presented at the 2003 annual NCES Summer Data Conference. The scholars' papers address teacher turnover; financing urban schools; the costs of improving student performance; distinguishing good schools from bad in principle and practice; an evaluation of the efficacy of state adequacy and equity indicators; school finance reform in Vermont; and school accountability.
9/20/2004
NCES 2004301 Teacher Attrition and Mobility: Results from the Teacher Follow-up Survey, 2000-01
The purpose of the Teacher Follow-up Survey is to provide information about teacher mobility and attrition. It is a one-year follow-up of a sample of teachers who were originally selected for the Teacher questionnaire of the Schools and Staffing Survey. The 2000-01 Teacher Follow-up Survey data in this report links responses from the 2000-01 school year to characteristics of these same teachers who participated in the 1999-2000 school year Schools and Staffing Survey.
8/17/2004
NCES 2001189 Attrition of New Teachers Among Recent College Graduates: Comparing Occupational Stability among 1992–93 College Graduates Who Taught and Those Who Worked in Other Occupations
This report examines the occupation stability of bachelor's degree recipients during the first 4 years after receiving the bachelor's degree. The analyses address the following question: were graduates who were teaching in 1994 more or less likely than those in other occupations to leave the work force or work in a different occupation in 1997? The data indicate that K-12 teachers among 1992-93 college graduates were among the least likely to work in different occupations in 1997 compared with 1994.
4/2/2001
NCES 2001323 A Primer for Making Cost Adjustments in Education
This publication was undertaken so that educators, the public, and policymakers might better understand both geographic and inflation adjustments, and how they might be applied to elementary/secondary education. The authors seek to inform these audiences of the differences in expenditures and costs, as well as how both geographic and inflation education cost adjustments can be used to assist in differentiating nominal and real costs. The authors are particularly concerned with approaches, techniques, and adjustments that may either not be appropriate for measuring costs in education, or that are inappropriately applied. In addition, they attempt to show that there is a real virtue to keeping cost adjustment indices as simple and understandable as possible. Cost adjustments for different geographic locations and for inflation are widely accepted and applied outside of elementary and secondary education. Virtually everyone has heard of the Consumer Price Index (CPI), published by the U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, as an inflation index. In addition, the public is also aware of cost-of-living differences between major metropolitan areas, and its effect on attracting workers with additional compensation. Many educators, however, have not yet chosen to implement either geographic or inflation education cost adjustments. Because there may not be a single best cost adjustment, it is important to share the approaches that have been utilized, examining the strengths and weaknesses of each. Because this work presents the view of the authors, and is intended to promote the exchange of ideas among researchers and policymakers, no official support by the U.S. Department of Education or NCES is intended or should be inferred.
1/29/2001
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