Skip Navigation

Search Results: (1-15 of 271 records)

 Pub Number  Title  Date
NCES 2022111 Characteristics of 2020–21 Public and Private K–12 Schools in the United States: Results From the National Teacher and Principal Survey
This First Look report provides descriptive statistics and basic information from the 2020–21 National Teacher and Principal Survey Public School and Private School Data files.
12/13/2022
REL 2023001 Stabilizing subgroup proficiency results to improve identification of low-performing schools
The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) requires states to identify schools with low-performing student subgroups for Targeted Support and Improvement (TSI) or Additional Targeted Support and Improvement (ATSI). Random differences between students’ true abilities and their test scores, also called measurement error, reduce the statistical reliability of the performance measures used to identify schools for these categorizations. Measurement error introduces a risk that the identified schools are unlucky rather than truly low performing. Using data provided by the Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE), the study team used Bayesian hierarchical modeling to improve the reliability of subgroup proficiency measures, allowing PDE to target the schools and students that most need additional support. PDE plans to incorporate stabilization as a “safe harbor” alternative in its 2022 accountability calculations. The study also shows that Bayesian stabilization produces reliable results for subgroups as small as 10 students—suggesting that states could choose to reduce minimum counts used in subgroup calculations (typically now around 20 students), promoting accountability for all subgroups without increasing random error. Findings could be relevant to states across the country, all of which face the same need to identify schools for TSI and ATSI, and the same tension between accountability and reliability, which Bayesian stabilization could help to resolve.
12/5/2022
REL 2023146 Indicators of School Performance in Texas
The School Improvement Division of the Texas Education Agency (TEA) identifies, monitors, and supports low-performing schools. To identify low-performing schools, TEA assigns annual academic accountability ratings to its districts and schools, but these ratings are only provided once per year and are vulnerable to disruptions in the assessment system. Schools that receive low accountability ratings do not meet accountability expectations and are considered low-performing.
12/5/2022
NCES 2022068 2021 NAEP School and Teacher Questionnaire Special Study

This report describes selected results from the 2021 NAEP School and Teacher Questionnaire Special Study conducted in March and April 2021. Results are based on a survey sample consisting of schools and teachers that serve fourth- and eighth-grade students, and are limited to states/jurisdictions and districts that agreed to participate in the study and met reporting standards. The report provides insight into some of the efforts schools and teachers made during a period of widespread academic disruption, including what support schools provided for distance learning; how schools and teachers supported students to address gaps in learning that may have occurred because of school closures; and how confident teachers were in facing the challenges of distance learning.

12/1/2022
NCES 2022080 A Retrospective Look at U.S. Education Statistics
This commemorative guide is intended to provide a better understanding of the history and use of federal education statistics that have been collected and reported by the federal education statistics agency (now the National Center for Education Statistics) since 1868. The “statistical profiles” in this report use updated historical trend data from 120 Years of American Education: A Statistical Portrait to offer an in-depth look at what each statistic measures, how it has been collected over the years, and what the data reveal about the statistic. Statistics covered in the report include enrollment in elementary and secondary schools; high school graduates and graduation rates, and postsecondary student costs and finances. Readers can browse these profiles online and download PDFs of individual profiles.
11/17/2022
NCES 2022124 2022 NAEP Mathematics Assessment: Highlighted Results at Grades 4 and 8 for the Nation, States, and Districts
This report presents selected results from the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2022 mathematics assessment. The report includes national, state, and district results on the performance of fourth- and eighth-grade students. Results are presented in terms of average scores and as percentages of students performing at or above the three NAEP achievement levels: NAEP Basic, NAEP Proficient, and NAEP Advanced. In addition to overall scores, results are reported by race/ethnicity, gender, type of school, and other demographic groups. The report also provides information about student performance on sample questions as well as data related to teaching and learning during and after the pandemic.
10/24/2022
NCES 2022126 2022 NAEP Reading Assessment: Highlighted Results at Grades 4 and 8 for the Nation, States, and Districts
This report presents selected results from the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2022 reading assessment. The report includes national, state, and district results on the performance of fourth- and eighth-grade students. Results are presented in terms of average scores and as percentages of students performing at or above the three NAEP achievement levels: NAEP Basic, NAEP Proficient, and NAEP Advanced. In addition to overall scores, results are reported by race/ethnicity, gender, type of school, and other demographic groups. The report also provides information about student performance on sample questions as well as data related to teaching and learning during and after the pandemic.
10/24/2022
NCES 2022029 Crime, Violence, Discipline, and Safety in U.S. Public Schools in 2019-20: Findings from the School Survey on Crime and Safety
The National Center for Education Statistics collects data on crime and violence in U.S. public schools through the School Survey on Crime and Safety (SSOCS). This First Look report presents findings from the 2019–20 SSOCS data collection.
7/12/2022
NCEE 2022003 Enhancing the Generalizability of Impact Studies in Education
This guide will help researchers design and implement impact studies in education so that the findings are more generalizable to the study’s target population. Guidance is provided on key steps that researchers can take, including defining the target population, selecting a sample of schools—and replacement schools, when needed—managing school recruitment, assessing, and adjusting for differences between the sample and target population, and reporting information on the generalizability of the study findings.
2/28/2022
NCES 2022009 Digest of Education Statistics, 2020
The 56th in a series of publications initiated in 1962, the Digest's purpose is to provide a compilation of statistical information covering the broad field of education from prekindergarten through graduate school. The Digest contains data on a variety of topics, including the number of schools and colleges, teachers, enrollments, and graduates, in addition to educational attainment, finances, and federal funds for education, libraries, and international comparisons.
2/10/2022
REL 2022131 Estimating Changes to Student Learning in Illinois Following Extended School Building Closures due to the COVID-19 Pandemic
The COVID-19 pandemic disrupted the education of students in Illinois and around the nation. Leaders at the Illinois State Board of Education and in Illinois public school districts want to better understand how student learning changed during the pandemic. This study examines data from 17 Illinois districts over five years, including four years prior to the pandemic, to measure how student learning changed in fall 2020 relative to fall terms prior to the pandemic. The study demonstrates how learning changed in both mathematics and reading for students in grades 3–8, as well as how these changes varied across student characteristics and district size. The study found that students in grades 4–8 scored lower than expected in mathematics following the onset of the pandemic, after adjusting for other factors. The magnitude varied by grade level. Larger estimated changes in learning occurred in grades 6–8 than in grades 4 and 5. Students in grades 3–8 did not experience any statistically significant changes in learning in reading. A further analysis of learning in mathematics showed that changes in learning varied across students with different characteristics but were unrelated to district size. The study findings should be interpreted with caution, especially when generalizing to the population of Illinois districts and students. The study includes a small number of districts, and the students in these districts differ from the statewide population of students.
12/1/2021
REL 2022128 Impacts of Home Visits on Students in District of Columbia Public Schools
This study examined the impacts of structured relationship-building teacher home visits conducted in grades 1–5 as part of a family engagement program in the District of Columbia Public Schools. Using a matched comparison group research design, the study measured the impacts of the home visits on student disciplinary incidents and attendance. The study found that a home visit before the start of the school year reduced the likelihood of a student having a disciplinary incident in that school year. During the school year following a home visit, 9.27 percent of visited students had a disciplinary incident compared with 12.22 percent of nonvisited comparison students. The study also found that, on average, a home visit slightly improved student attendance. The attendance rate averaged 95.28 percent for visited students and 94.93 percent for nonvisited comparison students.
11/23/2021
REL 2021115 The Effect of Discipline Reform Plans on Exclusionary Discipline Outcomes in Minnesota
In 2017 the Minnesota Department of Human Rights identified 43 local education agencies in the state as being in violation of the Minnesota Human Rights Act for their use of exclusionary discipline practices (suspensions, exclusions, and expulsions) at higher rates for American Indian students, Black students, and students in special education, as well as for their overall use of discipline practices. The department agreed not to pursue legal action against any identified local education agency that created and implemented a plan to reform its discipline practices. This study examined the use of exclusionary discipline practices by Minnesota local education agencies from 2014/15 through 2018/19 and the extent to which the creation of discipline reform plans by identified local education agencies was associated with changes in discipline outcomes. The study found that creating a discipline reform plan was not associated with a statistically significant change in exclusionary discipline actions experienced by students.
9/13/2021
NFES 2021094 Forum Guide to Staff Records
The Forum Guide to Staff Records was developed to help education agencies effectively collect and manage staff data; protect the privacy of staff data; and ensure that requests for data access and data releases are managed appropriately. The guide builds on information from the 2000 publication, Privacy Issues in Education Staff Records: Guidelines for Education Agencies and reflects how agencies have responded to changes in staff data over time. It includes a discussion of types of staff records, updated best practices for data collection and management, and case studies from state and local education agencies.
8/27/2021
REL 2021101 The Effect of School Report Card Design on Usability, Understanding, and Satisfaction

Education policymakers view transparency and accountability as critical to the success of schools. To support these goals, the District of Columbia Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE) has developed an online school report card for communicating information about the characteristics and performance of schools. To support OSSE’s interest in making report cards more usable, this study assessed the effect of different designs on how easy the report cards are to use and understand, how easy it is to find information in them, and whether users would recommend the site to others.

The study found that moving the link to details of the district’s School Transparency and Reporting (STAR) framework from the top of the page to beneath the STAR score improved the site’s usability and that reporting the number of points possible for each metric led to a better understanding of how the score is calculated. The combination of design features that produced the best performance on all measures included these two design changes. Other designs had mixed effects. In particular, making year-over-year change in school performance salient made it easier to identify which schools had improved the most, but participants disliked this feature (demonstrated by lower ratings for usability and satisfaction). In general, participants who accessed the site with mobile devices had more difficulty using it. This study illustrates how policymakers and practitioners in other states can efficiently test school report card design changes at scale.

7/27/2021
   1 - 15     Next >>
Page 1  of  19