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 Pub Number  Title  Date
NCES 2006865 Documentation for the NCES Comparable Wage Index Files
The Comparable Wage Index (CWI) is a measure of the systematic, regional variations in the salaries of college graduates who are not educators. It can be used by researchers to adjust district-level finance data at different levels in order to make better comparisons across geographic areas. The CWI was developed by Dr. Lori L. Taylor at the Bush School of Government and Public Service, Texas A&M University and William J. Fowler, Jr. at NCES. Dr. Taylor’s research was supported by a contract with the National Center for Education Statistics. The complete description of the research is provided in the NCES Research and Development “A Comparable Wage Approach to Geographic Cost Adjustment” (NCES 2006-321). This documentation describes four geographic levels of the CWI, which are presented in four separate files. These files are the school district, labor market, state, and a combined regional and national file. The school district file provides a CWI for each local education agency (LEA) in the NCES Common Core of Data (CCD) database. For each LEA there is a series of indexes for the years 1997 - 2004. The file can be merged with school district finance data, and this merged file can be used to produce finance data adjusted for geographic cost differences. This file also includes four agency typology variables. The additional files allow for similar geographic cost adjustments for larger geographic areas. NCES has sponsored the development of other geographic adjustment indexes in the past; the latest was for the 1993-94 school year.
6/15/2006
NCES 2006321 A Comparable Wage Approach to Geographic Cost Adjustment
In this report, NCES extends the analysis of comparable wages to the labor market level using a Comparable Wage Index (CWI). The basic premise of a CWI is that all types of workers—including teachers—demand higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living (e.g., San Diego) or a lack of amenities (e.g., Detroit, which has a particularly high crime rate) (Federal Bureau of Investigation 2003). This report develops a CWI by combining baseline estimates from the 2000 U.S. census with annual data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). Combining the Census with the Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) makes it possible to have yearly CWI estimates for states and local labor markets for each year after 1997. OES data are available each May and permit the construction of an up-to-date, annual CWI. The CWI methodology offers many advantages over the previous NCES geographic cost adjustment methodologies, including relative simplicity, timeliness, and intrastate variations in labor costs that are undeniably outside of school district control. However, the CWI is not designed to detect cost variations within labor markets. Thus, all the school districts in the Washington, DC metro area would have the same CWI cost index. Furthermore, as with other geographic cost indices, the CWI methodology does not address possible differences in the level of wages between college graduates outside the education sector and education sector employees. Nor does the report explore the use of these geographic cost adjustments as inflation adjustments (deflators.) These could be areas for fruitful new research on cost adjustments by NCES.
5/4/2006
NCES 2006176 Background Characteristics, Work Activities, and Compensation of Instructional Faculty and Staff: Fall 2003
This publication is the second from the 2004 National Study of Postsecondary Faculty (NSOPF:04), a study of faculty and instructional staff in public and private not-for-profit 2-year-and-above postsecondary institutions in the United States. This report describes the background characteristics, work activities, and compensation of instructional faculty and staff in fall 2003, by employment status, institution type, and program area. The results show that the majority (57 percent) of instructional faculty and staff were employed full time in fall 2003. Women made up a larger proportion of part-time than full-time instructional faculty and staff (47 percent vs. 38 percent). Full-time instructional faculty and staff, overall, reported working an average of 53 hours each week at all jobs both within and outside the institution, and part-time faculty averaged 40 hours per week at all jobs. The average basic salary from the institution for full-time instructional faculty and staff in all types of institutions was $66,800, and the average basic salary for part-time instructional staff was $11,000 in 2003.
12/21/2005
NCES 2005048 Labor Force Participation in Formal Work-Related Education in 2000-01
This report uses the Adult Education Survey of the 2001 National Household Education Survey Program to examine the extent and nature of participation in work-related education among adults in the labor force. The report provides data on instructional providers, topics studied, employer support, and other employment-related inducements for participation.
9/27/2005
NCES 2005174 1992-93 Bachelor's Degree Recipients and Their Opinions About Education in 2003
The E.D. TAB is the first publication using data from the final follow-up of the 1993/03 Baccalaureate and Beyond Longitudinal Study (B&B:93/03). Students who completed their bachelor's degree in 1993 were identified and contacted for follow-up interviews in 1994, 1997 and 2003. This report presents the percentages of students who reported important relationships between their undergraduate education and their lives in 2003; the percentages who enrolled for further postsecondary study; and their satisfaction with graduate study.
9/1/2005
NCES 2005172 2004 National Study of Postsecondary Faculty (NSOPF:04) Report on Faculty and Instructional Staff in Fall 2003
This publication is the first from the 2004 National Study of Postsecondary Faculty (NSOPF:04), a study of faculty and instructional staff employed in degree-granting public and private not-for-profit postsecondary institutions in the United States. This report describes the gender, race/ethnicity, tenure status, and income of all faculty and instructional staff, by employment status, institution type, and program area.
5/26/2005
NCES 2003173 CD-ROM: Baccalaureate and Beyond Longitudinal Study Data Analysis System (DAS) B&B:2000/01
The DAS CD-ROM contains the most recent postsecondary longitudinal data release, B&B:2000/01, as well as all other released DASs current as of August 2003. These data sets are for public use and do not allow a user direct access to the data, but do allow them to design and run basic analyses specific to their needs.
11/14/2003
NCES 2001378 Selected Papers in School Finance, 2000-01
The education finance community faces a wide variety of measurement issues. These commissioned papers address understanding how teacher compensation has changed over time; conceptual and methodological approaches for making inflation and geographic cost adjustments in education; tools of the trade for assessing the financial condition of public school districts; and an attempt to devise a synthesis of two divergent approaches to school-level financial reporting.
8/30/2001
NCES 2001152 Background Characteristics, Work Activities, and Compensation of Faculty and Instructional Staff in Postsecondary Institutions: Fall 1998
This publication is the first from the 1999 National Study of Postsecondary Faculty (NSOPF:99), a study of faculty and instructional staff in postsecondary institutions in the United States. This report describes the background characteristics, work activities, and compensation of faculty and instructional staff in public and private not-for-profit 2-year-and-above postsecondary institutions.
4/20/2001
NCES 2001168 Credits and Attainment: Returns to Postsecondary Education Ten Years After High School
This report examines 16 student characteristics and their association with earnings 10 years after high school. After controlling for academic and labor force experience and background characteristics, a baccalaureate or associates degree contributed significantly to earnings while some college credits with no degree attainment did not. The findings further suggest that college curriculum and student academic performance as well as early labor force experience figure prominently in the earnings of young adults as well. While the findings reaffirm the importance of education as a vehicle of social mobility, the direct and indirect effects of family and demographic background still constitute dominant factors in the formation of an individual’s earning capacity.
3/23/2001
NCES 2001034 Digest of Education Statistics, 2000
The Digest of Education Statistics provides a compilation of statistical information covering the broad field of education from prekindergarten through graduate school. Topics in the Digest include: the number of schools and colleges; teachers; enrollments; graduates; educational attainment; finances; federal funds for education; employment and income of graduates; libraries; technology; and international comparisons.
1/26/2001
NCES 2000192 Instructional Faculty and Staff in Public 2-year Colleges
This report uses selected findings from the 1993 National Study of Postsecondary Faculty (NSOPF:93) to examine differences between subgroups of faculty and staff within public 2-year colleges. It compares the backgrounds, teaching methods, and career lives of instructional faculty and staff who vary in terms of (a) age, (b) years of experience in their current jobs, and (c) primary teaching discipline. These comparisons show how those who are relatively new entrants to the teaching ranks at public 2-year colleges may differ from their older and more experienced colleagues. They also describe the instructional faculty and staff at public 2-year colleges as members of disciplinary subcultures.
5/3/2000
NCES 2000173 Salary, Promotion, and Tenure Status of Minority and Women Faculty in U.S. Colleges and Universities
This report examines differences among postsecondary faculty members by gender and by race/ethnicity. Comparisons were made on several human capital (e.g., education and experience) and structural (e.g., academic discipline and institution type) variables, as well as faculty outcomes (salary, tenure, and rank). A multivariate analysis of factors associated with salary was also conducted. Male faculty in this group were compared to female faculty, and comparisons were also made among four racial/ethnic groups: black, non-Hispanic; white, non-Hispanic; Hispanic; and Asian/Pacific Islander. The statistics in this report were generated from the 1993 National Study of Postsecondary Faculty (NSOPF:93).
3/7/2000
NCES 97286 Early Labor Force Experiences and Debt Burden
This report uses data from the Baccalaureate and Beyond (B&B) and Beginning Postsecondary Student (BPS) studies to examine the early labor force experiences of postsecondary education participants who graduated or left without a degree or certificate; their borrowing for postsecondary education;
9/9/1997
NCES 96158 A Descriptive Summary of 1992-93 Bachelor's Degree Recipients: 1 Year Later, With an Essay on Time to Degree
This report includes information concerning recent baccalaureate degree completers a year after finishing concerning undergraduate experiences and background, entry into graduate school or the labor market, household demographics, and civic participation.
8/30/1996
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