Skip Navigation

Search Results: (31-45 of 153 records)

 Pub Number  Title  Date
NCEE 20184009 Promoting Educator Effectiveness: The Effects of Two Key Strategies
The Teacher Incentive Fund (TIF) and its successor, the Teacher and School Leader (TSL) Incentive program, provide grants to support performance-based compensation systems or human capital management systems for teachers and principals in high-need schools. The evaluation brief synthesizes two recently completed National Center for Education Evaluation (NCEE) impact studies. One study focused on a strategy of providing educators with feedback on their performance for two years. The other study focused on a strategy of providing educators with bonuses for four years based on their performance.
3/21/2018
REL 2018291 Regional Educational Laboratory researcher-practitioner partnerships: Documenting the research alliance experience
This report provides a detailed account of the Regional Educational Laboratory (REL) Program's experience establishing and supporting research-practice partnerships (called "research alliances") during its 201217 contract cycle. The report adds to the growing literature base on researcher-practitioner partnerships by sharing how the RELs reported creating, engaging, and maintaining multiple partnerships, with the purpose of informing future collaborative efforts for researchers and practitioners and for those who wish to support research-practice partnerships. It addresses questions about: how REL research alliances fit within the broader context of research-practice partnerships; what characteristics existed among REL research alliances and how they evolved over time; and what challenges RELs reported experiencing while establishing and supporting research alliances and the strategies RELs employed to address those challenges. Finally, the paper discusses the implications of the REL research alliance experience for other networks of research-practice partnerships.
2/27/2018
NCEE 20184007 Preparing for Life after High School: The Characteristics and Experiences of Youth in Special Education. Findings from the National Longitudinal Transition Study 2012. Volume 3: Comparisons Over Time
The third report volume from the National Longitudinal Transition Study 2012 (NLTS 2012) presents information on the changes over time in the characteristics and high school experiences of secondary students participating in special education. NLTS 2012 is part of the congressionally-mandated National Assessment of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act 2004 (IDEA 2004) and is the third longitudinal study conducted by the U.S. Department of Education over several decades focused on youth with an individualized education program (IEP) supported by IDEA. This third volume compares survey data in 1987, 2003, and 2012 from the three NLTS, focusing on 15- to 18-year olds with an IEP overall and in 12 federal disability groups. Where comparable data are available, the volume also examines trends for 19- to 21-year olds who are still enrolled in high school.

Findings from the third volume suggest that, over the past decade (2003-2012), youth with an IEP have become more engaged in school and increased their use of school supports. At the same time, youth with an IEP are less likely than in the past to take some key steps to prepare for their transition to adult life. Among students with an IEP, youth with emotional disturbance and youth with intellectual disability experienced more positive changes over the past decade than youth in other disability groups.
2/7/2018
NCEE 20184001 The Impact of Providing Performance Feedback to Teachers and Principals: Final Report
This is a study of the implementation and impacts of a set of three educator performance measures: observations of teachers' classroom practices, value-added measures of teacher performance, and a 360-degree survey assessment of principals' leadership practices. A set of elementary and middle schools within each of eight districts were randomly assigned to either a treatment group in which the study's performance measures were implemented for two years or a control group in which they were not. In treatment schools, the study's measures were generally implemented for formative purposes, without formal stakes attached. A total of 127 schools participated in the study. This report provides findings on implementation of the measures and impacts of the feedback from those measures on educator and student outcomes. The study's performance measures were generally implemented as planned. All three measures differentiated educator performance, although the observation scores and principal leadership measure did not provide consistent feedback to educators on specific areas for improvement. Feedback from the study's measures had some positive impacts on teachers' classroom practice, principals' leadership, and student achievement. For instance, in Year 1, the intervention had a positive impact on students' achievement in mathematics, amounting to about four weeks of learning. In Year 2, the impact on mathematics achievement was similar in magnitude but not statistically significant. There was no impact in either year on reading/English language arts achievement.
12/19/2017
NCEE 20174024 An Exploration of Instructional Practices that Foster Language Development and Comprehension: Evidence from Prekindergarten through Grade 3 in Title I Schools
To date, efforts to include evidence-based instruction in large-scale reading programs have not generated meaningful improvements in student outcomes. To identify additional instructional practices that merit further evaluation, this evaluation brief provides an exploratory analysis of practices that are related to young students' growth in language skills and comprehension in listening and reading. The analysis is based on student test scores and observations of instructional practices in 1,035 classrooms in prekindergarten through grade 3 within 83 Title I schools during the 2011-2012 school year. Among the practices measured, those that were most consistently related to student growth include engaging students in defining new words, making connections between students' prior knowledge and the texts they read, promoting higher-order thinking, and focusing instruction on the meaning of texts.
8/16/2017
NCEE 20174022 Evaluation of the DC Opportunity Scholarship Program: Impacts After One Year
The DC Opportunity Scholarship Program (OSP), established in 2004, is the only federally-funded private school voucher program for low-income parents in the United States. This report examines impacts on achievement and other outcomes one year after eligible children were selected or not selected to receive scholarships using a lottery process in 2012, 2013, and 2014. The study found negative impacts on student achievement but positive impacts on parent perceptions of school safety, for those participating in the program. There were no statistically significant effects on parents' or students' general satisfaction with their schools or parent involvement in education.
4/27/2017
NCEE 20174023 Descriptive analysis in education: A guide for researchers
Whether the goal is to identify and describe trends and variation in populations, create new measures of key phenomena, or describe samples in studies aimed at identifying causal effects, description plays a critical role in the scientific process in general and education research in particular. Descriptive analysis identifies patterns in data to answer questions about who, what, where, when, and to what extent. This guide describes how to more effectively approach, conduct, and communicate quantitative descriptive analysis. The primary audience for this guide includes members of the research community who conduct and publish both descriptive and causal studies, although it could also be useful for policymakers and practitioners who are consumers of research findings. The guide contains chapters that discuss the important role descriptive analysis plays; how to approach descriptive analysis; how to conduct descriptive analysis; and how to communicate descriptive analysis findings.
3/28/2017
NCEE 20174016 Preparing for Life after High School: The Characteristics and Experiences of Youth in Special Education. Findings from the National Longitudinal Transition Study 2012.
This multi-volume descriptive report presents information from the National Longitudinal Transition Study 2012 (NLTS 2012), the third longitudinal study conducted by the U.S. Department of Education over several decades to examine the characteristics, experiences, and post-high school outcomes of youth with an individualized education program (IEP). NLTS 2012 collects information on a nationally representative set of nearly 13,000 youth who were ages 13-21 when selected for the study and, for the first time, includes a small sample of students without disabilities so that youth with an IEP can be compared to youth who receive accommodations through a plan developed under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and to youth with neither an IEP nor a 504 plan. Among youth with an IEP are students who represent each of the disability categories recognized by IDEA 2004.

The first two volumes of the report present updated information on secondary school youth with disabilities across the country based on 2012-2013 surveys collected from youth and parents. Volume 1 compares the characteristics and experiences of youth with an IEP to their non-IEP peers, and Volume 2 compares youth across disability groups. Overall, youth with an IEP feel positive about school but are more likely than their peers to struggle academically and to lag behind in taking key steps towards postsecondary education and jobs. Among youth with an IEP, those with autism, deaf-blindness, intellectual disability, multiple disabilities, and orthopedic impairments are most at-risk for not transitioning successfully beyond high school.
3/28/2017
NCEE 20174014 Implementation of Title I and Title II-A Program Initiatives: Results from 2013-14
This report examines implementation of program initiatives promoted through Title I and Title II-A of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) during the 201314 school year. It is based on surveys completed by all 50 states and the District of Columbia and nationally representative samples of districts, schools, and teachers. The report describes policy and practice in several core areas: content standards, assessments, accountability, and educator evaluation and support.
1/19/2017
NCEE 20174013 School Improvement Grants: Implementation and Effectiveness
The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 injected $3 billion into the federal School Improvement Grants (SIG) program, which awarded grants to states that agreed to implement one of four school intervention models in their lowest-performing schools. Each of the models prescribed specific practices designed to improve student outcomes. Despite the sizable investment, comprehensive evidence on the implementation and impact of SIG has been limited. Using 2013 survey and administrative data from nearly 500 schools in 22 states, this report focuses on whether schools receiving a grant used the practices promoted by SIG and how that compares to other schools. The report also focuses on whether SIG had an impact on student outcomes. Findings show that SIG schools reported using more practices than other schools, but there was no evidence that SIG caused those schools to use more practices. There was also no evidence that SIG had significant impacts on math or reading test scores, high school graduation, or college enrollment.
1/18/2017
NCEE 20174005 Upward Bound at 50: Reporting on Implementation Practices Today
Launched in 1965, Upward Bound (UB) is one of the flagship federal college access programs targeted to low-income or potential first-generation college students. This evaluation report is based on a on a 2013 survey of regular UB project directors and examines the approaches that UB projects use to provide core program services. While legislation prescribes the seven core services to be offered to students, findings suggest similarities in how Upward Bound projects focus and deliver only some core services and variation across projects operated ("hosted") by different kinds of institutions and in different locales.
11/17/2016
NCEE 20174004 Early Implementation Findings From a Study of Teacher and Principal Performance Measurement and Feedback
This is an impact study of the implementation and impacts of a set of three educator performance measures: observations of teachers' classroom practices, value-added measures of teacher performance, and a 360-degree survey assessment of principals' leadership practices. A set of elementary and middle schools within each of eight districts were randomly assigned to either a treatment group in which the study's performance measures were implemented or a control group in which they were not. A total of 127 schools participated in the study. This report provides descriptive information on the first of two years of implementation. The classroom observation and principal leadership measures were implemented generally as planned, although fewer teachers and principals accessed their value-added reports than the study intended. All three measures differentiated teacher performance, although the observation scores were mostly at the upper end of the scale. For the principal leadership measure, principal self-ratings, teachers' ratings of the principal, and the principal's supervisor's ratings of the principal often differed. Both teachers and principals in schools selected to implement the intervention reported receiving more feedback on their performance than did their counterparts in control schools.
11/2/2016
NCEE 20174008 Do Low-Income Students Have Equal Access to Effective Teachers? Evidence from 26 Districts
This report examines whether low-income students are taught by less effective teachers than high-income students and if so, whether reducing this inequity would close the student achievement gap. It also describes how the hiring of teachers and their subsequent movement into and out of schools could affect low-income students' access to effective teachers. The study includes fourth- to eighth-grade teachers over five school years (2008-2009 to 2012-2013) in 26 school districts across the country. Teacher effectiveness is measured using a statistical approach that estimates a teacher's contribution to student learning controlling for students' prior achievement and other characteristics. The study found small inequities in teacher effectiveness between low- and high-income students. However, in a small subset of districts, there is meaningful inequity in access to effective teachers in math where providing equal access to effective teachers over a five year period would reduce the math achievement gap by at least a tenth of a standard deviation of student achievement, the equivalent of about 4 percentile points. The report also finds patterns of teacher hiring and transfers that are consistent with small inequities in teacher effectiveness while teacher attrition is not.
10/27/2016
NCEE 20174001 Race to the Top: Implementation and Relationship to Student Outcomes
Race to the Top (RTT), one of the Obama administration's signature programs and one of the largest federal government investments in an education grant program, received $4.35 billion in funding as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. Through three rounds of competition in 2010 and 2011, RTT awarded grants to states that agreed to implement a range of education policies and practices designed to improve student outcomes. Using 2013 interview data from all states, this report documents whether states that received an RTT grant used the policies and practices promoted by RTT and how that compares to non-grantee states. The report also examines whether receipt of an RTT grant was related to improvements in student outcomes. Findings show that 2010 RTT grantees reported using more policies and practices than non-grantees in four areas (standards and assessments, teachers and leaders, school turnaround, charter schools), and 2011 RTT grantees reported using more in one area (teachers and leaders). However, the relationship between RTT and student outcomes was not clear, as trends in test scores could be plausibly interpreted as providing evidence of either a positive, negative, or null effect for RTT.
10/26/2016
NCEE 2016002 Can student test scores provide useful measures of school principals' performance?
This study assessed the extent to which four principal performance measures based on student test scores--average achievement, school value-added, adjusted average achievement, and adjusted school value-added--accurately reflect principals' contributions to student achievement in future years. Average achievement used information on students' end-of-year achievement without taking into account the students' past achievement; school value-added accounted for students' own past achievement by measuring their growth; and adjusted average achievement and adjusted school value-added credited principals if their schools' average achievement and value-added, respectively, exceeded predictions based on the schools' past performance on those same measures. The study conducted two sets of analyses using Pennsylvania's statewide data on students and principals from 2007/08 to 2013/14. First, using data on 2,424 principals, the study assessed the extent to which ratings from each measure are stable by examining the association between principals' ratings from earlier and later years. Second, using data on 123 principals, the study examined the relationship between the stable part of each principal's rating and his or her contributions to student achievement in future years. Based on results from both analyses, the study simulated each measure's accuracy for predicting principals' contributions to student achievement in the following year. The study found that the two performance measures that did not account for students' past achievement--average achievement and adjusted average achievement--provided no information for predicting principals' contributions to student achievement in the following year. The two performance measures that accounted for students' past achievement--school value-added and adjusted school value-added--provided, at most, a small amount of information for predicting principals' contributions in the following year, with less than one-third of each difference in value-added ratings across principals reflecting differences in their future contributions. These findings suggest that principal evaluation systems should emphasize measures that were found to provide at least some information about principals' future contributions: school value-added or adjusted school value-added. However, study findings also indicate that even the value-added measures will often be inaccurate in identifying principals who will contribute effectively or ineffectively to student achievement in future years. Therefore, states and districts should exercise caution when using these measures to make major decisions about principals and seek to identify nontest measures that can accurately predict principals' future contributions.
9/29/2016
<< Prev    31 - 45     Next >>
Page 3  of  11