Skip Navigation
Click to open navigation

Indicator 25 Snapshot: Attainment of a Bachelor's or Higher Degree for Racial/Ethnic Subgroups
(Last Updated: July 2017)

In 2014, the percentage of Hispanic adults age 25 and older with a bachelor's or higher degree ranged from 8 percent for Guatemalans to 53 percent for Venezuelans. Among Asian subgroups, the percentage ranged from 4 percent for Bhutanese to 73 percent for Asian Indians.

Attainment of a bachelor's or higher degree is associated with a number of positive economic outcomes, such as higher median earnings and higher employment rates.1 This indicator examines the percentage of adults age 25 or older who have attained a bachelor's or higher degree for specific Hispanic and Asian subgroups (including, for example, the Mexican, Puerto Rican, Chinese, and Asian Indian subgroups).


Figure 25.1a. Percentage of adults age 25 and older with a bachelor's or higher degree, by selected Hispanic subgroups: 2014

Figure 25.1a. Percentage of adults age 25 and older with a bachelor's or higher degree, by selected Hispanic subgroups: 2014


1 Includes other Central American subgroups not shown separately.
SOURCE: U.S. Department of Commerce, Census Bureau, American Community Survey (ACS), 2014. See Digest of Education Statistics 2015, table 104.40.


In 2014, about 14 percent of Hispanic adults age 25 and older had earned a bachelor's or higher degree. The percentage of adults who had earned a bachelor's or higher degree was lower for some Hispanic subgroups than the average for Hispanic adults overall: Guatemalan (8 percent), Salvadoran (9 percent), Honduran (9 percent), and Mexican (10 percent). The percentage for all other subgroups was higher than the average for Hispanic adults overall and ranged from 18 percent for Puerto Ricans and Dominicans to 53 percent for Venezuelans.


Figure 25.2a. Percentage of adults age 25 and older with a bachelor's or higher degree, by selected Asian subgroups: 2014

Figure 25.2a.	Percentage of adults age 25 and older with a bachelor's or higher degree, by selected Asian subgroups: 2014


! Interpret data with caution. The coefficient of variation (CV) for this estimate is between 30 and 50 percent.
1 Includes Taiwanese.
2 In addition to the subgroups shown, also includes Sri Lankan.
3 Consists of Indonesian and Malaysian.
NOTE: Race categories exclude persons of Hispanic ethnicity.
SOURCE: U.S. Department of Commerce, Census Bureau, American Community Survey (ACS), 2014. See Digest of Education Statistics 2015, table 104.40.


Differences by Asian subgroup were also found in the percentage of adults age 25 and older who had earned at least a bachelor's degree. In 2014, the percentages of Asian Indian (73 percent), Korean (54 percent), and Chinese (54 percent) adults who had earned at least a bachelor's degree were above the average of 52 percent for all Asian adults. The percentage of Japanese and Pakistani adults who had earned a bachelor's or higher degree was not measurably different from the average for all Asian adults. The percentages for all other groups were lower than the average for all Asian adults and ranged from 4 percent for Bhutanese to 48 percent for Filipino adults.

Top


1 Kena, G., Hussar W., McFarland J., de Brey C., Musu- Gillette, L., Wang, X., Zhang, J., Rathbun, A., Wilkinson- Flicker, S., Diliberti M., Barmer, A., Bullock Mann, F., and Dunlop Velez, E. (2016). The Condition of Education 2016 (NCES 2016-144). U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. Washington, DC.