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Indicator 16 Snapshot: High School Status Dropout Rates for Racial/Ethnic Subgroups
(Last Updated: July 2017)

In 2014, among Hispanic 16- to 24-year-olds in the United States, the high school status dropout rate ranged from 2 percent for Panamanian individuals to 29 percent for Guatemalan individuals. Among their Asian peers, status dropout rates ranged from 1 percent for Korean, Chinese, and Japanese individuals to 27 percent for Burmese individuals.

While the indicator High School Status Dropout Rates presents overall high school status dropout rates for Hispanic and Asian 16- to 24-year-olds, there is much diversity within both of these groups. The Census Bureau's American Community Survey can be used to estimate the status dropout rates for many specific Asian and Hispanic subgroups, including, for example, Mexican, Puerto Rican, Chinese, and Vietnamese.


Figure 16.1a. Status dropout rates of 16- to 24-year-olds, by selected Hispanic subgroups: 2014

Figure 16.1a. Status dropout rates of 16- to 24-year-olds, by selected Hispanic subgroups: 2014


! Interpret data with caution. The coefficient of variation (CV) for this estimate is between 30 and 50 percent.
‡Reporting standards not met. Either there are too few cases for a reliable estimate or the coefficient of variation (CV) is 50 percent or greater.
1 Includes other Central American subgoups not shown separately.
NOTE: The status dropout rate is the percentage of 16- to 24-year-olds who are not enrolled in school and have not earned a high school credential (either a diploma or an equivalency credential such as a GED certificate). Data are based on sample surveys of persons living in households and noninstitutionalized group quarters. Noninstitutionalized group quarters include college and university housing, military quarters, facilities for workers and religious groups, and temporary shelters for the homeless. Although rounded numbers are displayed, the figures are based on unrounded estimates.
SOURCE: U.S. Department of Commerce, Census Bureau, American Community Survey (ACS), 2014. See Digest of Education Statistics 2015, table 219.80.


The status dropout rate is the percentage of 16- to 24-year-olds who are not enrolled in school and have not earned a high school credential.1 In 2014, the high school status dropout rate for all Hispanic 16- to 24-year-olds was 11 percent. Status dropout rates for individuals of Guatemalan (29 percent), Honduran (19 percent), and Salvadoran (15 percent) descent were higher than the total rate for all Hispanic individuals. The rates for Mexican, Costa Rican, and Puerto Rican individuals, and Other Hispanic individuals (10 percent)—who could not be classified into one of the prespecified subgroup categories—were not measurably different from the total Hispanic rate. The status dropout rates for the remaining Hispanic subgroups were lower than the total Hispanic rate, ranging from 2 percent for Panamanian individuals to 8 percent for Dominican individuals.


Figure 16.2a. Status dropout rates of 16- to 24-year-olds, by selected Asian subgroups: 2014

Figure 16.2a. Status dropout rates of 16- to 24-year-olds, by selected Asian subgroups: 2014


! Interpret data with caution. The coefficient of variation (CV) for this estimate is between 30 and 50 percent.
‡ Reporting standards not met. Either there are too few cases for a reliable estimate or the coefficient of variation (CV) is 50 percent or greater.
1 Includes Taiwanese.
2 In addition to the subgroups shown, also includes Sri Lankan.
3 Consists of Indonesian and Malaysian.
NOTE: The status dropout rate is the percentage of 16- to 24-year-olds who are not enrolled in school and have not earned a high school credential (either a diploma or an equivalency credential such as a GED certificate). Data are based on sample surveys of persons living in households and noninstitutionalized group quarters. Although rounded numbers are displayed, the figures are based on unrounded estimates.
SOURCE: U.S. Department of Commerce, Census Bureau, American Community Survey (ACS), 2014. See Digest of Education Statistics 2015, table 219.80.


Among all Asian 16- to 24-year-olds, the high school status dropout rate was 3 percent in 2014. Five Asian subgroups had status dropout rates that were higher than the total Asian rate: Burmese (27 percent), Nepalese (20 percent), Laotian (9 percent), Cambodian (8 percent), and Hmong (6 percent). Status dropout rates for Korean and, Chinese (1 percent each) individuals were lower than the total rate for all Asians. Status dropout rates for the remaining Asian subgroups were not measurably different from the total rate for all Asian 16- to 24-year-olds.

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1 High school credentials include either a diploma or an equivalency credential such as a GED certificate.