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Digest of Education Statistics: 2007
Digest of Education Statistics: 2007

NCES 2008-022
March 2008

Appendix A.2. Fast Response Survey System

The Fast Response Survey System (FRSS) was established in 1975 to collect issue-oriented data quickly and with a minimal burden on respondents. The FRSS, whose surveys collect and report data on key education issues at the elementary and secondary levels, was designed to meet the data needs of Department of Education analysts, planners, and decisionmakers when information could not be collected quickly through NCES's large recurring surveys. Findings from FRSS surveys have been included in congressional reports, testimony to congressional subcommittees, NCES reports, and other Department of Education reports. The findings are also often used by state and local education officials.

Data collected through FRSS surveys are representative at the national level, drawing from a universe that is appropriate for each study. The FRSS collects data from state education agencies and national samples of other educational organizations and participants, including local education agencies, public and private elementary and secondary schools, elementary and secondary school teachers and principals, and public libraries and school libraries. To ensure a minimal burden on respondents, the surveys are generally limited to three pages of questions, with a response burden of about 30 minutes per respondent. Sample sizes are relatively small (usually about 1,000 to 1,500 respondents per survey) so that data collection can be completed quickly.

Further information on FRSS may be obtained from

Bernie Greene
Early Childhood, International, and Crosscutting Studies Division
Data Development Program
National Center for Education Statistics
1990 K Street NW
Washington, DC 20006
http://nces.ed.gov/surveys/frss/

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Condition of America's Public School Facilities: 1999

This report (NCES 2000-032) provides national data about the condition of public schools in 1999 based on a survey conducted by NCES using its Fast Response Survey System (FRSS). Specifically, this report provides information about the condition of school facilities and the costs to bring them into good condition; school plans for repairs, renovations, and replacements; the age of public schools; and overcrowding and practices used to address overcrowding. The results presented in this report are based on questionnaire data for 903 public elementary and secondary schools in the United States. The responses were weighted to produce national estimates that represent all regular public schools in the United States.

Further information on FRSS may be obtained from

Bernie Greene
Early Childhood, International, and Crosscutting Studies Division
Data Development Program
National Center for Education Statistics
1990 K Street NW
Washington, DC 20006
http://nces.ed.gov/surveys/frss/

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Internet Access in Public Schools and Classrooms

The Internet Access in U.S. Public Schools and Classrooms survey is part of the NCES Fast Response Survey System (FRSS). It is designed to assess the federal government's commitment to assist every school and classroom in connecting to the Internet by the year 2000. In 1994, NCES began surveying approximately 1,000 public schools each year about their access to the Internet, access in classrooms, and, since 1996, their type of internet connections. Recent administrations of this survey have been expanded to cover emerging issues. The 2003 survey was designed to update the questions in the 2002 survey and covered the following topics: school connectivity, student access to computers and the Internet, school websites, technologies and procedures to prevent student access to inappropriate websites, and teacher professional development on how to incorporate use of the Internet into the curriculum.

In 2005 respondents were asked about the number of instructional computers with access to the Internet, the types of Internet connections, technologies and procedures used to prevent student access to inappropriate material on the Internet, and the availability of hand-held and laptop computers for students and teachers. Respondents also provided information on teacher professional development on how to integrate the use of the Internet into the curriculum, and on the use of the Internet to provide opportunities and information for teaching and learning.

The 2005 survey on internet access was the last in this series since internet access in schools has been nearly 100 percent since 2003.

Further information on internet access in public schools and classrooms may be obtained from

Bernie Greene
Early Childhood, International, and Crosscutting Studies Division
Data Development Program
National Center for Education Statistics
1990 K Street NW
Washington, DC 20006
http://nces.ed.gov/surveys/frss/