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International Comparisons

Enrollment Rates by Country

Last Updated: May 2022
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While all OECD countries showed near universal enrollment of 5- to 14-year-olds, enrollment rates among 15- to 19-year-olds varied across OECD countries in 2019. These rates ranged from 61 percent in Colombia to 94 percent in Belgium, Slovenia, and Ireland. In the United States, 83 percent of 15- to 19-year-olds were enrolled in school at any level, which was lower than the 84 percent average of OECD countries.

This indicator uses data from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) to compare educational enrollment rates by age group across countries.1 The latest year for which these data are available is 2019, prior to the coronavirus pandemic. The OECD is a group of 38 countries whose purpose is to promote trade and economic growth. The OECD also collects and publishes an array of data on its member countries.

Across OECD countries, students generally follow a similar pathway through the education system. Before beginning primary (elementary) education, children may be enrolled in an early childhood education program and/or a preprimary education program. Kindergarten in the United States is an example of a preprimary program.2 Across OECD countries, compulsory education typically begins at the start of primary education.3, 4 Upon completion of primary education, students progress through lower secondary (middle school) and upper secondary (high school) education. Compulsory education typically ends during or at the completion of upper secondary education—around age 17 or 18 in the United States. Students may then continue into either postsecondary nontertiary education (short career/technical educational programs) or tertiary education (postsecondary degree programs). While the educational pathway is similar across OECD countries, enrollment rates differ across countries and age groups.5

Select a subgroup characteristic from the drop-down menu below to view relevant text and figures.

Figure 1. Percentage of 3- and 4-year-olds enrolled in school, by Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) country: 2019
Figure 1. Percentage of 3- and 4-year-olds enrolled in school, by Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) country: 2019

1 Refers to the mean of the data values for all reporting Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries, to which each country reporting data contributes equally. The average includes all current OECD countries for which a given year's data are available, even if they were not members of OECD in that year.

NOTE: Of the 38 OECD countries, 37 are included in this figure. Canada is excluded because the 2019 enrollment rate for 3- and 4-year-olds is not available. For each country, this figure shows the number of 3- and 4-year-olds who are enrolled in that country as a percentage of that country's total population of 3- and 4-year-olds. If a country enrolls many residents of other countries, the country's total population in the specified age group can be smaller than the total number enrolled, resulting in enrollment rate estimates exceeding 100 percent. Enrollment rates exceeding 100 percent have been capped at 100 percent in this figure. Conversely, if a country has many residents who are enrolled outside of the country, the country's enrollment rates may be underestimated. Enrollment rate estimates can also be affected if population and enrollment data were collected at different times. Includes both full-time and part-time students, such as students who are enrolled in regular schools for a fraction of their time and receiving education in other forms for the remaining time. Although rounded numbers are displayed, the figures are based on unrounded data.

SOURCE: Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), Online Education Database. Retrieved September, 28, 2021, from http://stats.oecd.org/Index.aspx. See Digest of Education Statistics 2021, table 601.35.

In recent years, many OECD countries, (although not the United States) have begun to offer universal legal entitlements to early childhood education programs to all children for at least 1 or 2 years before the start of compulsory schooling.6 As a result, on average 82 percent of 3- and 4-year-olds were enrolled at any education level across OECD countries in 2019.7, 8 In comparison, 54 percent of 3- and 4-year-olds in the United States were enrolled. These data on the percentages of 3- and 4-year-olds enrolled in school exclude child care programs that are not primarily designed to provide educational experiences, such as day care programs. Among the 37 countries9 for which the OECD reported 2019 data, the percentage of 3- and 4-year-olds enrolled ranged from 25 percent in Turkey to 100 percent in France, Ireland, Israel, and the United Kingdom. Twenty-six countries reported enrollment rates among 3- and 4-year-olds that were higher than the average of OECD countries, while 11 countries reported enrollment rates lower than the average of OECD countries. In 18 countries, at least 90 percent of 3- and 4-year-olds were enrolled. In 2019, the United States had one of the lowest enrollment rates among 3- and 4-year-olds (54 percent) of any OECD country; only Costa Rica, Switzerland, and Turkey reported lower enrollment rates (48, 26, and 25 percent, respectively).
Figure 2. Percentage of 5- to 14-year-olds enrolled in school, by Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) country: 2019
Figure 2. Percentage of 5- to 14-year-olds enrolled in school, by Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) country: 2019

1 Refers to the mean of the data values for all reporting Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries, to which each country reporting data contributes equally. The average includes all current OECD countries for which a given year's data are available, even if they were not members of OECD in that year.

NOTE: All 38 OECD countries are included in this figure. For each country, this figure shows the number of 5- to 14-year-olds who are enrolled in that country as a percentage of that country's total population of 5- to 14-year-olds. If a country enrolls many residents of other countries, the country's total population in the specified age group can be smaller than the total number enrolled, resulting in enrollment rate estimates exceeding 100 percent. Enrollment rates exceeding 100 percent have been capped at 100 percent in this figure. Conversely, if a country has many residents who are enrolled outside of the country, the country's enrollment rates may be underestimated. Enrollment rate estimates can also be affected if population and enrollment data were collected at different times. Includes both full-time and part-time students, such as students who are enrolled in regular schools for a fraction of their time and receiving education in other forms for the remaining time. Although rounded numbers are displayed, the figures are based on unrounded data.

SOURCE: Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), Online Education Database. Retrieved September, 28, 2021, from http://stats.oecd.org/Index.aspx. See Digest of Education Statistics 2021, table 601.35.

Enrollment rates among 5- to 14-year-olds were similar across OECD countries in 2019.10 In 2019, the percentage of 5- to 14-year-olds enrolled in school varied by 6 percentage points across all 38 OECD countries—ranging from 94 percent in the Slovak Republic to 100 percent in Australia, Canada, France, Ireland, Japan, Lithuania, Mexico, the Netherlands, and Switzerland.11 Some 99 percent of 5- to 14-year-olds in the United States were enrolled in school at any level, compared with 98 percent on average across OECD countries. Enrollment among 5- to 14-year-olds in OECD countries is nearly universal due to compulsory schooling laws that cover primary and lower secondary education programs in all OECD countries.
Figure 3. Percentage of 15- to 19-year-olds enrolled in school, by Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) country and level of education: 2019
Figure 3. Percentage of 15- to 19-year-olds enrolled in school, by Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) country and level of education: 2019

†Not applicable.

#Rounds to zero.

1 Refers to the mean of the data values for all reporting Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries, to which each country reporting data contributes equally. The average includes all current OECD countries for which a given year's data are available, even if they were not members of OECD in that year.

2 Refers to International Standard Classification of Education (ISCED) level 2 (lower secondary education) and level 3 (upper secondary education). Secondary education generally corresponds to grades 7–12 in the United States.

3 Refers to programs classified at ISCED level 4 (postsecondary nontertiary education). Postsecondary nontertiary education generally corresponds to postsecondary vocational programs below the associate's degree level in the United States.

4 Postsecondary degree-granting programs (tertiary education programs) correspond to all postsecondary programs leading to associate's and higher degrees in the United States. Includes ISCED 2011 level 5 (corresponding to U.S. programs at the associate's degree level), level 6 (bachelor's or equivalent level), level 7 (master's or equivalent level), and level 8 (doctoral or equivalent level). Enrollment rates may not be directly comparable across countries due to differing definitions of tertiary education and the age at which it begins.

NOTE: Of the 38 OECD countries, 34 are included in this figure. Japan, Canada, the Czech Republic, and Italy are excluded because 2019 enrollment rates for 15- to 19-year-olds in these countries are not available for all education levels presented in the figure. For each country, this figure shows the number of 15- to 19-year-olds who are enrolled in that country as a percentage of that country's total population of 15- to 19-year-olds. If a country enrolls many residents of other countries, the country's enrollment rates may be overestimated. Conversely, if a country has many residents who are enrolled outside of the country, the country's enrollment rates may be underestimated. Enrollment estimates can also be affected if population and enrollment data were collected at different times. In addition to secondary and postsecondary education, total enrollment in all levels of education may include enrollment in ISCED 2011 level 1 (primary or elementary education). Includes both full-time and part-time students. Although rounded numbers are displayed, the figures are based on unrounded data. Detail may not sum to totals because of rounding.

SOURCE: Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), Online Education Database. Retrieved September 28, 2021, from http://stats.oecd.org/Index.aspx. See Digest of Education Statistics 2021 table 601.40.

While all OECD countries had near universal enrollment of 5- to 14-year-olds, enrollment rates among 15- to 19-year-olds varied more widely across OECD countries. Among the 37 countries12 for which the OECD reported 2019 data on 15- to 19-year-olds, the percentage enrolled in school at any level ranged from 61 percent in Colombia to 94 percent in Belgium, Slovenia, and Ireland. Part of this variation can be attributed to the end of compulsory schooling and the transition of some students into the labor market. In 2019, some 83 percent of 15- to 19-year-olds in the United States were enrolled in school at any level, which was lower than the average of OECD countries (84 percent).
The 15- to 19-year-old age group spans the period during which students generally finish secondary education and potentially go on to more advanced schooling.13 Among 15- to 19-year-olds who remain enrolled in school after completion of secondary education, some transition into postsecondary nondegree education. This generally corresponds to postsecondary vocational programs below the associate’s degree level in the United States.14 Others may pursue postsecondary degree-granting education. This corresponds to an associate’s or higher degree in the United States.15 On average across OECD countries, 71 percent of 15- to 19-year-olds were enrolled in secondary education in 2019. One percent were enrolled in postsecondary nondegree education programs. Eleven percent were enrolled in postsecondary degree-granting education programs.16 [Grade level/Student level]
Across OECD countries, the share of 15- to 19-year-olds enrolled in secondary education differed from the share enrolled in a higher level of education. For example, the percentage of 15- to 19-year-olds in the United States enrolled in secondary education (64 percent) was lower than the average of OECD countries (71 percent). At the same time, the percentage enrolled in postsecondary nondegree education programs (just under 1 percent) was similar to the average of OECD countries (just over 1 percent). The percentage enrolled in postsecondary degree-granting education programs (18 percent) was higher than the average of OECD countries (11 percent). In all 25 countries for which the OECD reported 2019 data for secondary, postsecondary nondegree, and postsecondary degree-granting education, higher percentages of 15- to 19-year-olds were enrolled in secondary education than in postsecondary nondegree or postsecondary degree-granting education. [Grade level/Student level]
In the United States, it is more common for 15- to 19-year-olds to transition into a postsecondary degree-granting program than into a postsecondary nondegree program after completing secondary education. Among the 26 countries17 for which the OECD reported 2019 data on postsecondary nondegree education programs, the percentages of 15- to 19-year-olds who were enrolled in such programs was less than 1 percent in 17 countries and ranged from 1 to 5 percent in the other 9 countries. Among the 37 countries18 for which the OECD reported 2019 data on postsecondary degree-granting education programs, the percentages of 15- to 19-year-olds who were enrolled in such programs ranged from 1 percent in Denmark and Luxembourg to 31 percent in the Republic of Korea. For all 25 countries15, 16 for which the OECD reported 2019 data on both postsecondary nondegree and postsecondary degree-granting education, enrollment rates of 15- to 19-year-olds in postsecondary nondegree programs were lower than enrollment rates in postsecondary degree-granting programs. [Grade level/Student level]
The specific age at which students make the transition from secondary education to postsecondary education differs by country. In all 38 OECD countries, more than 70 percent of 15-year-olds and 16-year-olds were enrolled in secondary education in 2019. This was also true for 17-year-olds in all countries except for Colombia, Costa Rica, and Mexico. In contrast, 28 of 37 OECD countries with available data reported that the percentage of 18-year-olds enrolled in secondary education was higher than the percentage enrolled in a postsecondary degree-granting program. Fourteen of 37 OECD countries with available data reported that the percentage of 19-year-olds enrolled in secondary education was higher than the percentage enrolled in a postsecondary degree-granting program. In the United States, 100 percent of 15-year-olds, 31 percent of 18-year-olds, and 4 percent of 19-year-olds were enrolled in secondary education in 2019. [Grade level/Student level]
Figure 4. Percentage of 19-year-olds enrolled in school by Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) country and level of education: 2019
Figure 4. Percentage of 19-year-olds enrolled in school by Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) country and level of education: 2019

†Not applicable.

# Rounds to zero.

1 Refers to the mean of the data values for all reporting Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries, to which each country reporting data contributes equally. The average includes all current OECD countries for which a given year's data are available, even if they were not members of OECD in that year.

2 Refers to International Standard Classification of Education (ISCED) 2011 level 2 (lower secondary education) and level 3 (upper secondary education). Secondary education generally corresponds to grades 7–12 in the United States.

3 Refers to programs classified at ISCED 2011 level 4 (postsecondary nontertiary education). Postsecondary nontertiary education generally corresponds to postsecondary vocational programs below the associate's degree level in the United States.

4 Postsecondary degree-granting programs (tertiary education programs) correspond to all postsecondary programs leading to associate's and higher degrees in the United States. Includes ISCED 2011 level 5 (corresponding to U.S. programs at the associate's degree level), level 6 (bachelor's or equivalent level), level 7 (master's or equivalent level), and level 8 (doctoral or equivalent level). Enrollment rates may not be directly comparable across countries due to differing definitions of postsecondary education and the age at which it begins.

NOTE: Of the 38 OECD countries, 34 are included in this figure. Japan, Canada, the Czech Republic, and Italy are excluded because 2019 enrollment rates for 19-year-olds in these countries are not available for all education levels presented in the figure. For each country, this figure shows the number of 19-year-olds who are enrolled in that country as a percentage of that country's total population of 19-year-olds. If a country enrolls many residents of other countries, the country's enrollment rates may be overestimated. Conversely, if a country has many residents who are enrolled outside of the country, the country's enrollment rates may be underestimated. Enrollment estimates can also be affected if population and enrollment data were collected at different times. Includes both full-time and part-time students. Although rounded numbers are displayed, the figures are based on unrounded data.

SOURCE: Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), Online Education Database. Retrieved September 28, 2021, from http://stats.oecd.org/Index.aspx. See Digest of Education Statistics 2021 table 601.40.

Since enrolling in a postsecondary degree-granting education program is the most prevalent educational pathway in the United States among those who remain enrolled in school after secondary education, the next portion of this indicator examines how the transition from secondary education to a postsecondary degree-granting program in the United States compares with other OECD countries. Examining enrollment rates of 19-year-olds draws out differences in the typical age students transition from secondary education to a postsecondary degree-granting program across countries. Overall, 58 percent of 19-year-olds in the United States were enrolled in school at any level, compared with 61 percent on average across OECD countries. As previously noted, 14 of 37 OECD countries reported that a higher percentage of 19-year-olds were enrolled in secondary education than in a postsecondary degree-granting program in 2019. In contrast, 23 countries—including the United States—reported having a higher percentage of 19-year-olds enrolled in a postsecondary degree-granting program than in secondary education. In the United States, 53 percent of 19-year-olds were enrolled in a postsecondary degree-granting program, whereas 4 percent were enrolled in secondary education. The percentage of 19-year-olds enrolled in secondary education in the United States was lower than the average of OECD countries (4 vs. 24 percent), but the percentage of 19-year-olds enrolled in a postsecondary degree-granting program in the United States was higher than the average of OECD countries (53 vs. 34 percent). [Grade level/Student level]
Figure 5. Percentage of 19-year-olds enrolled in school, by Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) country and level of education: 2019
Figure 5. Percentage of 19-year-olds enrolled in school, by Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) country and level of education: 2019

# Rounds to zero.

1 Refers to the mean of the data values for all reporting Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries, to which each country reporting data contributes equally. The average includes all current OECD countries for which a given year’s data are available, even if they were not members of OECD in that year.

2 In general, 20- to 29-year-olds who are enrolled in school but not in a postsecondary degree-granting program are enrolled in a postsecondary nondegree program or in secondary education. “Postsecondary nondegree programs” refer to programs classified at International Standard Classification of Education (ISCED) level 4. ISCED 4 (postsecondary nontertiary education) typically corresponds to postsecondary vocational programs below the associate’s degree level in the United States. “Secondary education” refers to ISCED level 2 (lower secondary education) and level 3 (upper secondary education) and generally corresponds to grades 7–12 in the United States.

3 Corresponds to all postsecondary degree-granting programs leading to associate’s and higher degrees in the United States. Includes ISCED level 5 (corresponding to U.S. programs at the associate’s degree level), level 6 (bachelor’s or equivalent level), level 7 (master’s or equivalent level), and level 8 (doctoral or equivalent level). Enrollment rates may not be directly comparable across countries due to differing definitions of postsecondary education and the age at which it begins.

NOTE: Of the 38 OECD countries, 36 are included in this figure. Japan and the Netherlands are excluded because 2019 enrollment rates for 20- to 29-year-olds are not available. For each country, this figure shows the number of 20- to 29-year-olds enrolled in that country as a percentage of that country’s total population of 20- to 29-year-olds. If a country enrolls many residents of other countries, the country’s enrollment rates may be overestimated. Conversely, if a country has many residents who are enrolled outside of the country, the country’s enrollment rates may be underestimated. Enrollment estimates can also be affected if population and enrollment data were collected at different times. Includes both full-time and part-time students. Although rounded numbers are displayed, the figures are based on unrounded data. Detail may not sum to totals because of rounding.

SOURCE: Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), Online Education Database. Retrieved September 28, 2021, from http://stats.oecd.org/Index.aspx. See Digest of Education Statistics 2021 table 601.40.

Among the 36 countries19 for which the OECD reported 2019 data on 20- to 29-year-olds, the percentage enrolled in school ranged from 12 percent in Luxembourg to 42 percent in Turkey. Thirteen countries reported that 30 percent or more of 20- to 29-year-olds were enrolled in school in 2019. Three of these countries (Turkey, Australia, and Denmark) reported that 40 percent or more of 20- to 29-year-olds were enrolled. In 2019, some 24 percent of 20- to 29-year-olds in the United States were enrolled in school at any level, which was lower than the average of OECD countries (27 percent).
The 20- to 29-year-old age group spans the period during which students generally persist through (and potentially complete) a postsecondary degree-granting program. In all 36 OECD countries for which 2019 data were available, higher percentages of 20- to 29-year-olds were enrolled in a postsecondary degree program in 2019 than were enrolled in lower levels of education. The percentage enrolled in postsecondary degree programs ranged from 6 percent in Luxembourg to 37 percent in Turkey, while the percentage enrolled in lower levels of education ranged from less than 1 percent in the Republic of Korea to 13 percent in Sweden. In the United States, 23 percent of 20- to 29-year-olds were enrolled in a postsecondary degree program, which was higher than the OECD average (22 percent). One percent of U.S. 20- to 29-year-olds were enrolled in a lower level of education, compared with 5 percent on average across OECD countries. [Grade level/Student level]

1 Enrollment rates in this indicator include students enrolled in both public and private schools. Includes both full-time and part-time students, such as students who are enrolled in regular schools for a fraction of their time and receiving education in other forms for the remaining time.

2 Early childhood educational programs are targeted at children ages 0–2 and preprimary education programs are targeted at children age 3 years until the start of primary education. The upper age limit for preprimary education depends on the theoretical starting age of primary education. (See http://uis.unesco.org/sites/default/files/documents/international-standard-classification-of-education-isced-2011-en.pdf.)

3 The boundary between preprimary and primary coincides with the transition point in an education system where systematic teaching and learning in reading, writing, and mathematics begins. Although some preprimary programs may already provide some introduction in reading, writing, and mathematics, these programs do not yet give children sound basic skills in these areas, and thus do not sufficiently fulfill the criteria for classification as primary education. The transition from preprimary to primary education is typically marked by entry into nationally designated primary, elementary, or basic educational institutions or programs. (See http://uis.unesco.org/sites/default/files/documents/international-standard-classification-of-education-isced-2011-en.pdf.)

4 OECD. (2021). Who Participates in Education? In Education at a Glance 2021: OECD Indicators. (Indicator B1, pp. 146 – 157). Paris: OECD Publishing. https://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/education/education-at-a-glance-2021_b35a14e5-en.

5 This indicator focuses on differences in enrollment rates across countries. These national-level estimates may mask important variations in enrollment rates within a country, such as by region, gender, or other demographic attributes.

6 OECD. (2021). How Do Early Childhood Education Systems Differ Around the World? In Education at a Glance 2021: OECD Indicators. (Indicator B2, pp. 158 – 173). Paris: OECD Publishing. https://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/education/education-at-a-glance-2021_b35a14e5-en.

7 While these enrollment rates include 3- and 4-year-olds enrolled in school at any level, 3- and 4-year-olds across OECD countries are generally enrolled in programs classified by the International Standard Classification of Education (ISCED) 2011 as ISCED 0 (early childhood education). In the United States, ISCED 0 programs are commonly referred to as preprimary school, preschool, nursery school, or prekindergarten. Child care programs that are not primarily designed to provide educational experiences, such as day care programs, are not included in ISCED 0.

8 Throughout this indicator, the “average of OECD countries” refers to the mean of the data values for all reporting OECD countries, to which each country reporting data contributes equally. The average includes all current OECD countries for which a given year’s data are available, even if they were not members of the OECD in that year. Countries excluded from analyses in this indicator may be included in the average of OECD countries.

9 Canada is excluded because 2019 data on the enrollment rate of 3- and 4-year-olds are not available.

10 While enrollment rates include 5- to 14-year-olds enrolled in school at any level, students of this age group across OECD countries are generally enrolled in programs classified as ISCED 1 (primary education or elementary school) or ISCED 2 (lower secondary education or middle school). In the United States, ISCED 1 corresponds to grades 1–6 and ISCED 2 corresponds to grades 7–9.

11 Some of a country’s population may be enrolled in a different country, and some persons enrolled in the country may be residents of a different country. If a country enrolls many residents of other countries, the country’s total population in the specified age group can be smaller than the total number enrolled, resulting in enrollment rate estimates exceeding 100 percent. Enrollment rates exceeding 100 percent have been capped at 100 percent. Conversely, if a country has many residents who are enrolled outside of the country, the country’s enrollment rates may be underestimated. Enrollment rate estimates can also be affected if population and enrollment data were collected at different times. Includes both full-time and part-time students, such as students who are enrolled in regular schools for a fraction of their time and receiving education in other forms for the remaining time.

12 Japan is excluded because 2019 data on enrollment rates of 15- to 19-year-olds are not available.

13 Secondary education includes programs classified as ISCED 2 (lower secondary education or middle school) and ISCED 3 (upper secondary education or high school). Secondary education generally corresponds to grades 7–12 in the United States.

14 Refers to programs classified at ISCED level 4 (postsecondary nontertiary education).

15 Postsecondary degree programs include ISCED level 5 (corresponding to U.S. programs at the associate’s degree level), level 6 (bachelor’s or equivalent level), level 7 (master’s or equivalent level), and level 8 (doctoral or equivalent level).

16 The average of OECD countries for the percentage of 15- to 19-year-olds enrolled in postsecondary nondegree education programs excludes Chile, Costa Rica, Denmark, Mexico, the Netherlands, the Republic of Korea, Slovenia, Turkey, and the United Kingdom because postsecondary nondegree programs are not applicable in these countries and excludes Canada, the Czech Republic, and Italy because 2019 data on enrollment rates of 15- to 19-year-olds in postsecondary nondegree programs are not available. The average of OECD countries for the percentage of 15- to 19-year-olds enrolled in postsecondary nondegree education programs excludes Japan because 2019 data on enrollment rates of 15- to 19-year-olds in postsecondary degree-granting programs are not available.

17 Chile, Costa Rica, Denmark, Mexico, the Netherlands, the Republic of Korea, Slovenia, Turkey, and the United Kingdom are excluded because postsecondary nondegree programs are not applicable in these countries. Canada, the Czech Republic, and Italy are excluded because 2019 data on enrollment rates of 15- to 19-year-olds in postsecondary nondegree programs are not available.

18 Japan is excluded because 2019 data on enrollment rates of 15- to 19-year-olds in postsecondary degree-granting programs are not available.

19 Japan and the Netherlands are excluded because 2019 data on enrollment rates of 20- to 29-year-olds are not available.

Supplemental Information

Suggested Citation

National Center for Education Statistics. (2022). Enrollment Rates by Country. Condition of Education. U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences. Retrieved [date], from https://nces.ed.gov/programs/coe/indicator/cgh.