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National Center for Education Statistics

NCES Releases Updated 2022–23 Data Table on School District Structures

The National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) has released an updated data table (Excel) on local education agencies (LEAs)1  that serve multiple counties. This new data table—which was updated with 2022–23 data—can help researchers examine LEA structures and break down enrollment by LEA and county. Read this blog post to learn more about the table and how it can be used to understand structural differences in school districts.

The data table—which compiles data from both the Common Core of Data (CCD) and Demographic and Geographic Estimates (EDGE)—provides county and student enrollment information on each LEA in the United States (i.e., in the 50 states and the District of Columbia) with a separate row for each county in which the agency has a school presence. The table includes all LEA types, such as regular school districts, independent charter school districts, supervisory union administrative centers, service agencies, state agencies, federal agencies, specialized public school districts, and other types of agencies.

LEA presence within a county is determined by whether it had at least one operating school in the county. School presence within a county is determined by whether there is at least one operating school in the county identified in the CCD school-level membership file. For example, an LEA that is coterminous with a county has one record (row) in the listing. A charter school LEA that serves a region of a state and has a presence in five counties has five records. LEA administrative units, which do not operate schools, are listed in the county in which the agency is located.

In the 2022–23_LEA_List tab, column D shows the “multicnty” (i.e., multicounty) variable. LEAs are assigned one of the following codes:

1 = School district (LEA) is in single county and has reported enrollment.

2 = School district (LEA) is in more than one county and has reported enrollment.

8 = School district (LEA) reports no schools and no enrollment, and the county reflects county location of the administrative unit. 

9 = School district (LEA) reports schools but no enrollment, and the county reflects county location of the schools.

In the Values tab, the “Distribution of local education agencies, by enrollment and school status: 2022–23” table shows the frequency of each of the codes (1, 2, 8, and 9) (i.e., the number of districts that are marked with each of the codes in the 2022–23_LEA_List tab):

  • 17,042 LEAs had schools in only one county.
  • 754 LEAs had schools located in more than one county and reported enrollment for these schools (note that in the file there are 1,936 records with this characteristic since each LEA is listed once for every county in which it has a presence).
  • 1,008 LEAs had no schools of their own and were assigned to a single county based on the location of the LEA address. (Typically, supervisory union administrative centers are examples of these LEAs.)
  • 262 LEAs had schools located in one county but did not report enrollment for these schools (note that in the file there are 384 records with this characteristic since each LEA is listed once for every county in which it has a presence).

This data table is part of our effort to meet emerging data user needs and provide new products in a timely manner. Be sure to follow NCES on XFacebookLinkedIn, and YouTube and subscribe to the NCES News Flash to stay informed when these new products are released.

By Tom Snyder, AIR


[1] Find the official definition of an LEA.

[2] See Number and enrollment of public elementary and secondary schools, by school level, type, and charter, magnet, and virtual status: Selected years, 1990–91 through 2018–19Enrollment of public elementary and secondary schools, by school level, type, and charter, magnet, and virtual status: School years 2010–11 through 2021–22 (ed.gov)Number of public elementary and secondary education agencies, by type of agency and state or jurisdiction: 2004–05 and 2005–06; and Number of public elementary and secondary education agencies, by type of agency and state or jurisdiction: School years 2020–21 and 2021–22.

[3] See Education Governance for the Twenty-First Century: Overcoming Structural Barriers to School Reform.

[4] The annual School District Finance Survey (F-33) is collected by NCES from state education agencies and the District of Columbia. See Documentation for the NCES Common Core of Data School District Finance Survey (F-33) for more information.