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 Pub Number  Title  Date
NCES 2021009 Digest of Education Statistics, 2019
The 55th in a series of publications initiated in 1962, the Digest's purpose is to provide a compilation of statistical information covering the broad field of education from prekindergarten through graduate school. The Digest contains data on a variety of topics, including the number of schools and colleges, teachers, enrollments, and graduates, in addition to educational attainment, finances, and federal funds for education, libraries, and international comparisons.
2/25/2021
REL 2021060 Integrating Reading Foundations: A Tool for College Instructors of Pre‑service Teachers

The College Instructor’s Guide is designed to assist college instructors build pre-service teacher knowledge of evidence-based strategies to help kindergarten through grade 3 students acquire the language and literacy skills needed to succeed academically. This tool is intended to be used in conjunction with the Foundational Skills to Support Reading for Understanding in Kindergarten Through 3rd Grade practice guide, produced by the What Works Clearinghouse (WWC), an investment of the Institute of Education Sciences at the U.S. Department of Education. College instructors may use the lessons in this tool to provide collaborative learning experiences which engage pre-service teachers in activities that will expand their knowledge base as they read, discuss, share, and apply the key ideas and strategies presented in the WWC Practice Guide.

Each lesson in this College Instructor's Guide includes the following:

  • A recommendation reminder that provides a snapshot of the WWC practice guide recommendation and how-to steps for pre-service teachers.
  • Guidance to support college instructors as they teach pre-service teachers about a specific skill, why it is important in learning to read, and how to support that skill in the classroom.
  • Videos that explain foundational reading skills and demonstrate the use of activities intended to improve foundational reading skills with students in grades K-3. Pre-service teachers are asked to complete a video reflection worksheet for each video.
  • Activities for pre-service teachers to complete with peers in the college setting that reinforce foundational skills taught to students in grades K-3.
  • Observation forms to be used in the practicum setting that include guiding questions related to each recommendation to help pre-service teacher’s compare newly learned strategies to observed practices.
2/24/2021
REL 2021070 Characteristics of Approved Universal Prekindergarten Programs in Vermont in 2018/19
In an effort to increase access to high-quality prekindergarten (preK) programs for all of Vermont's young children, Vermont passed universal preK legislation in 2014 (Act 166). All 3- and 4-year-old children have access to 10 hours a week of state-funded preK through a mixed-delivery system of public school and private programs. Families can enroll their children at no cost in any approved preK program across the state regardless of location. To better understand the characteristics of universal preK programs related to program availability, program quality, and family choice, Vermont partnered with the Regional Educational Laboratory Northeast & Islands to describe the characteristics of preK programs overall and separately for private and public school programs and programs located in local education agencies with different population sizes and poverty levels. The study found that in 2018/19, fewer than 50 percent of programs were at capacity, with more private programs and more programs in high-poverty local education agencies at capacity, raising questions about the availability of preK programs in high-poverty areas. Local education agencies at different population sizes and poverty levels had programs of similar quality within their boundaries, suggesting that Act 166, as enacted, allows for an equitable preK system for families living in rural and low-income areas of the state as it relates to program quality. The results also suggest that the current ability of families to access preK in locations other than their local education agency of residence must be retained if Vermont is to maximize availability of preK for families living in local education agencies that have few—sometimes only one—preK programs. Private programs reported being open more hours per day and weeks per year than public school programs, which may reduce the need for transitions throughout the day and year for children in private programs who need additional child care beyond the 10 hours per week of universal preK.
2/23/2021
REL 2021058 Trends and Gaps in Reading Achievement across Kindergarten and Grade 1 in Two Illinois School Districts
To assess educational progress in the early grades and identify achievement gaps, the Midwest Early Childhood Education Research Alliance examined reading achievement data among students in kindergarten and grade 1 in two districts in Illinois. The study documents overall reading achievement in these and examines disparities in achievement among groups defined by race/ethnicity, eligibility for the national school lunch program, English learner status, participation in special education, and gender. District administrators, policymakers, and educators can use the findings to make decisions about allocating resources to students and schools. This study analyzed student records and assessment data from two cohorts of kindergarten and grade 1 students—one from Elgin Area Schools (District U–46) and one from Springfield Public Schools (District 186). District U–46 used the Fountas and Pinnell Benchmark Assessment System—a formative reading assessment administered by teachers—to assess the reading proficiency of kindergarten and grade 1 students. District 186 used the Measures of Academic Progress for Primary Grades assessment, an adaptive assessment that is appropriate for universal screening and growth measurement of students’ reading. The study team performed separate analyses for both districts given a discrete, categorical outcome variable for District U–46 and a continuous outcome variable for District 186. The study found that reading achievement increased across the kindergarten and grade 1 years for all students. However, there were differences in reading achievement across student demographic groups. In both districts, Asian and White students had higher achievement than Black and Hispanic students, and students not eligible for the national school lunch program and students not in special education had higher achievement than students with this eligibility and this status. In District U–46, non-English learner students had higher achievement levels than English learner students. In District 186, female students started kindergarten and ended grade 1 with slightly higher levels of reading achievement than male students. District administrators, policy makers, and educators can use these findings to make decisions about allocating resources—such as professional development, literacy coaches, or books—to schools that serve larger concentrations of Black or Hispanic students, students eligible for the national school lunch program, students in special education, or English learner students. Examining achievement patterns by student demographic group is an important first step in identifying whether districts or schools need to distribute resources or opportunities differently to achieve more equitable outcomes across student demographic groups. District administrators, policy makers, and educators can use the results to motivate conversations about the root causes of inequities and how to resolve them.
2/9/2021
REL 2021044 Participation in State-Funded Prekindergarten in Oklahoma
Oklahoma offers state-funded prekindergarten (preK) to all 4-year-old children. The Regional Educational Laboratory (REL) Southwest Early Childhood Education Research Partnership members in Oklahoma requested more comprehensive evidence on disparities in student participation in state-funded preK by student characteristics and geographic locale. Such disparities in participation can indicate challenges in access to or use of the program. Using administrative records from the Oklahoma State Department of Education, REL Southwest calculated the percentages of first-time public school kindergarten students who participated in Oklahoma’s state-funded preK program in the prior year for five cohorts (2014/15 through 2018/19). In addition to describing unadjusted participation rates, the study also used multivariate statistical models to estimate relationships between student characteristics, the local availability of preK options (measured as estimated travel time), and students’ participation in state-funded preK. Across the five years examined, 74 percent of public school kindergarten students had attended state-funded preK in the prior year. Participation varied across the state, and a substantially greater percentage of students in rural districts participated than students in nonrural (that is, urban or suburban) districts. In addition, the study identified groups of students by student characteristics that participated less often, including students eligible for free lunch, Black/African American students, and Pacific Islander students. The study also examined relationships between participation and geographic measures of access to early learning and care. Students who lived further from a state-funded preK site were less likely to participate, and students who lived further from a Head Start Center were more likely to participate in state-funded preK. The differences in student participation across geographic areas and student characteristics indicate an opportunity for policies and strategies to promote greater awareness of, and enrollment in, state-funded preK or other early learning and care opportunities.
12/16/2020
REL 2020024 Progress of Arizona Kindergartners toward English Proficiency in Grade 3 by English Learner Student Classification
This study was prompted by the Arizona Department of Education’s interest in learning more about the progress of English learner students toward English proficiency in the early grades. The study examined the English language proficiency and English language arts (ELA) proficiency (reading and writing at grade level) of non-native English speaker students in kindergarten and in grade 3. About 11 percent of 2013/14 kindergartners in Arizona were initially classified as English learner students. At the end of that school year, Arizona retested all non-native English speaker kindergartners after setting a higher threshold for English language proficiency. After reassessment, the proportion of kindergartners classified as English learner students rose to 18 percent. Students initially classified as English language proficient and reclassified as English learner students at the end of kindergarten were no more likely to achieve proficiency by the end of grade 3 than were students initially classified at the basic/intermediate (below proficient) level. This finding suggests that students who were reclassified likely needed English learner services at kindergarten entry. One group of students outperformed native English speakers on grade 3 proficiency assessments: non-native English speakers who were proficient when they entered kindergarten and confirmed as proficient when reassessed at the end of the school year. This finding increases confidence that these non-native English speaker students were appropriately classified as not needing English learner services. A small amount of the variation in English language proficiency and ELA proficiency in grade 3 was attributable to school characteristics, but most of the variation in outcomes was attributable to student characteristics. This suggests that practitioners and policymakers might want to investigate how to reduce gaps in achievement within schools in addition to increasing students’ achievement levels overall. Student characteristics associated with lower outcomes in grade 3 included lower English language proficiency level at kindergarten entry, being eligible for special education services, being a racial/ethnic minority student, and being male. Being socioeconomically disadvantaged was associated with a lower probability of achieving ELA proficiency by the end of grade 3 but not with reaching English language proficiency.
8/12/2020
WWC 2020009 Web-Based Intelligent Tutoring for the Structure Strategy
This What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) intervention report summarizes the research on Web-Based Intelligent Tutoring for the Structure Strategy (ITSS), a web-based program that provides supplemental literacy instruction and practice for students in kindergarten to grade 8. The program is designed to develop students’ literacy skills needed to understand factual texts encountered in school and everyday life. The program teaches students how to follow the logical structure of factual text and to use text structure to improve understanding and recall. Based on the research, the WWC found that ITSS is likely to increase students’ reading comprehension in grades 4-7.
4/9/2020
WWC 2020008 Balanced Leadership® Intervention Report
This What Works Clearinghouse intervention report summarizes the research on Balanced Leadership, a professional development program for current and aspiring school leaders in schools serving students in kindergarten to grade 12. The program helps school leaders understand and implement a set of actions and behaviors that may be associated with improved student outcomes. The WWC's review of eligible research found that Balanced Leadership may increase principal retention at the school.
3/11/2020
REL 2020016 Kindergarten Teacher's Guide to Supporting Family Involvement in Foundational Reading Skills
This Kindergarten Teacher's Guide provides information for kindergarten teachers on how to support families as they practice foundational reading skills at home. It serves as a companion to the What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) Foundational Skills to Support Reading for Understanding in Kindergarten Through 3rd Grade. Both guides present four research-based recommendations and how-to steps: the WWC guide is for teaching children at school, and this guide is to help teachers support families in practicing foundational reading skills at home.
br/> The information in this Kindergarten Teacher’s Guide is designed to assist teachers in supporting out-of-school literacy activities that are aligned to classroom instruction, informed by student need, grounded in evidence-based practices, and facilitated by ongoing parent-teacher communication. The Teacher’s Guide provides a framework for literacy support activities presented during schools’ family literacy nights and parent-teacher conferences.
1/6/2020
NCES 2020009 Digest of Education Statistics, 2018
The 54th in a series of publications initiated in 1962, the Digest's purpose is to provide a compilation of statistical information covering the broad field of education from prekindergarten through graduate school. The Digest contains data on a variety of topics, including the number of schools and colleges, teachers, enrollments, and graduates, in addition to educational attainment, finances, and federal funds for education, libraries, and international comparisons.
12/24/2019
REL 2020012 Children's knowledge and skills at kindergarten entry in Illinois: Results from the first statewide administration of the Kindergarten Individual Development Survey
Starting in fall 2017, the Illinois State Board of Education required kindergarten teachers to use an observational kindergarten entry assessment called the Kindergarten Individual Development Survey. This study examined whether the measures formed using the assessment data were valid and reliable and described the means and variation in children's knowledge and skills at school entry. To inform future professional development on data collection and use, the study team also interviewed teachers and administrators about their experience with the assessment.
10/28/2019
NCES 2019051 User’s Manual for the ECLS-K:2011 Kindergarten-Fifth Grade Data File and Electronic Codebook, Public Version
This User’s Manual focuses on the fifth-grade round of data collection and data for the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 2010-11 (ECLS-K:2011). It describes the study instruments and data collection procedures used in the spring 2016 collection. It also describes the kindergarten-fifth grade data file structure and variables created from data collected in the fifth-grade round.
7/12/2019
NCES 2019050 ECLS-K:2011 Public-Use Kindergarten-Fifth Grade Data File and Electronic Codebook
The Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 2010-11 (ECLS-K:2011) is a longitudinal study that followed a nationally representative sample of students from their kindergarten year to the spring of 2016, when most of the students were in fifth grade. This public-use data file includes data from every round of data collection: the fall and spring of the 2010-11 school year, when all of the students were in kindergarten; the fall and spring of the 2011-12 school year, when most of the students were in first grade; the fall and spring of the 2012-13 school year, when most of the students were in second grade; the spring of 2014, when most of the students were in third grade; the spring of 2015, when most of the students were in fourth grade, and the spring of 2016, when most of the students were in fifth grade. The file includes information collected from the students, their parents/guardians, their teachers, and their school administrators in each year of the study. It also includes information collected in the spring of 2011 from their kindergarten-year before- and after-school care providers.
7/12/2019
NCES 2019101 User’s Manual for the ECLS-K:2011 Kindergarten-Fifth Grade Data File and Electronic Codebook, Restricted Version
This User’s Manual focuses on the fifth-grade round of data collection and data for the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 2010-11 (ECLS-K:2011). It describes the study instruments and data collection procedures used in the spring 2016 collection. It also describes the kindergarten-fifth grade data file structure and variables created from data collected in the fifth-grade round. This manual is only available on the ECLS-K:2011 Restricted-Use Kindergarten-Fifth Grade Data File and Electronic Codebook CD.
2/25/2019
NCES 2019100 ECLS-K:2011 Restricted-Use Kindergarten-Fifth Grade Data File and Electronic Codebook
The Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 2010-11 (ECLS-K:2011) is a longitudinal study that followed a nationally representative sample of students from their kindergarten year to the spring of 2016, when most of the students were in fifth grade. This restricted-use data file includes data from every round of data collection: the fall and spring of the 2010-11 school year, when all of the students were in kindergarten; the fall and spring of the 2011-12 school year, when most of the students were in first grade; the fall and spring of the 2012-13 school year, when most of the students were in second grade; the spring of 2014, when most of the students were in third grade; the spring of 2015, when most of the students were in fourth grade, and the spring of 2016, when most of the students were in fifth grade. The file includes information collected from the students, their parents/guardians, their teachers, and their school administrators in each year of the study. It also includes information collected in the spring of 2011 from their kindergarten-year before- and after-school care providers.
2/22/2019
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