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 Pub Number  Title  Date
REL 2021088 Alaska Native Students as English Learner Students: Examining Patterns in Identification, Classification, Service Provision, and Reclassification
This report examines the population of Alaska Native students who are classified as English learner (EL) students and how EL policies function for these students, focusing on EL identification, classification, service provision, and reclassification as fluent English proficient. Alaska is one of several states where Indigenous students make up a large segment of the EL population. Drawing on Alaska state data from 2011/12 to 2018/19, this study found that roughly a quarter of Alaska Native kindergarten students statewide were classified as EL students. Alaska Native EL students are a diverse group. The Alaska Native EL students in the study spoke 24 different home languages and had varied demographic and education characteristics. Compared with non–Alaska Native EL kindergarten students, Alaska Native EL students had lower English proficiency levels and higher rates of economic disadvantage in a cash-based economy (defined in box 1). The percentage of kindergarten students who were Alaska Native EL students was highest in schools that were rural, schools that had higher rates of economic disadvantage, and schools that employed fewer English as a second language teachers. In interviews, four district leaders shared that identification, classification, service provision, and reclassification practices were the same for Alaska Native EL students as for other Alaska EL students. These interviewees shared that limited financial and human resources compromised the quality and availability of EL supports. However, a review of 26 district EL Plans of Service revealed that less than a third of districts described policies and services directed specifically toward Alaska Native EL students, including heritage language programs, community outreach, and collaboration between Alaska Native education programs and EL programs. Statewide, EL reclassification rates were low for all EL students but especially low among Alaska Native EL students. By the end of grade 7, only 11 percent of Alaska Native EL students had been reclassified compared with 30 percent of non–Alaska Native EL students. This report identifies implications for Alaska, and for other states serving Indigenous EL students, for ensuring that EL education policy, funding, and service provision support Alaska Native and other Indigenous EL students equitably and with excellence.
5/18/2021
NFES 2008802 Managing an Identity Crisis: Forum Guide to Implementing New Federal Race and Ethnicity Categories
This Guide provides information about the 1997 standards and suggestions about how to implement them at the state and school district level. It covers developing policies and procedures, communicating with staff and the public, re-identification, and coding, storing, reporting, and bridging data.
9/18/2008
NCES 98034 State Survey on Racial and Ethnic Classifications
This report details results from the state survey on racial and ethnic classifications conducted for NCES and the Office of Civil Rights in the Department of Education as part of research associated with the comprehensive review of Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Statistical Policy Directive 15, "Race and Ethnic Standards for Federal Statistics and Administrative Reporting."
9/8/1998
NCES 98035 Issue Brief: Racial and Ethnic Classifications Used in U.S. Public Schools
This issue brief looks at how changes in the nation's racial and ethnic makeup present special problems to the public schools, which collect and aggregate race and ethnicity data for federal programs and other reporting purposes.
7/24/1998
NCES 96092 Racial and Ethnic Classifications Used by Public Schools
This report presents the findings from a national survey designed to assess the race and ethnicity data collection needs of public schools. It will provide information on how schools report data for federal purposes, and describe any problems schools may be experiencing using the 5 standard categories for race and ethnicity. Keywords: racial and ethnic classifications
5/6/1996
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