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 Pub Number  Title  Date
REL 2021104 Using High School and College Data to Predict Teacher Candidates' Performance on the Praxis at Unibetsedåt Guåhan (University of Guam)

Policymakers and educators on Guåhan (Guam) are concerned about the persistent shortage of qualified K-12 teachers. Staff at the Unibetsedåt Guåhan (University of Guam, UOG) School of Education, the only local university that offers a teacher training and certification program, believe that more students are interested in becoming teachers but that the program's admissions requirements--in particular, the Praxis® Core test, which consists of reading, writing, and math subtests--might be a barrier. Little is known about the predictors for passing the Praxis Core test. This makes it difficult to develop and implement targeted interventions to help students pass the test and prepare for the program.

This study examined which student demographic and academic preparation characteristics predict passing the Praxis Core test and each of its subtests. The study examined two groups of students who attempted at least one subtest within three years of enrolling at UOG: students who graduated from a Guåhan public high school (group 1) and all students, regardless of the high school from which they graduated (group 2). Just over half the students in each group passed the Praxis Core test (passed all three subtests) within three years of enrolling at UOG. The pass rate was lower on the math subtest than on the reading and writing subtests. For group 1, students who earned credit for at least one semester of Advanced Placement or honors math courses in high school had a higher pass rate on the Praxis Core test than students who did not earn any credit for those courses, students who earned a grade of 92 percent or higher in grade 10 English had a higher pass rate on the reading subtest than students who earned a lower grade, and students who earned a grade higher than 103 percent in grade 10 English had a higher pass rate on the writing subtest than students who earned a lower grade. For group 2, students who did not receive a Pell Grant (a proxy for socioeconomic status) had a higher Praxis Core test pass rate than students who did receive a Pell Grant, students who earned a grade of B or higher in first-year college English had a higher Praxis Core test pass rate than students who earned a lower grade, and male students had a higher pass rate on the reading and math subtests than female students.

The study findings have several implications for intervention plans at both the secondary and postsecondary levels. Although students must pass all three Praxis subtests to be admitted to the teacher preparation program at the School of Education, examining student performance on each subtest can help stakeholders understand the content areas in which students might need more support. In the long term preparing more prospective teachers for the Praxis Core test might increase program enrollment, which in turn might increase the on-island hiring pool.

7/19/2021
NCES 2021011 Technical Report and User Guide for the 2018 Program for International Student Assessment (PISA): Data Files and Database with U.S.-Specific Variables
This technical report and user guide is designed to provide researchers with an overview of the design and implementation of PISA 2018, as well as with information on how to access the PISA 2018 data. This information is meant to supplement OECD publications by describing those aspects of PISA 2018 that are unique to the United States.
7/8/2021
REL 2021092 Using High School Data to Explore Early College Success on Pohnpei, Federated States of Micronesia
As of 2010, about 15 percent of residents older than age 25 on Pohnpei in the Federated States of Micronesia (FSM) had completed an associate degree or higher. To increase the number of college graduates, the Pohnpei Department of Education and the College of Micronesia-FSM are working together to improve the early college outcomes of their students. They noted that in 2018, 42 percent of applicants from Pohnpei to the College of Micronesia-FSM were not admitted or were admitted to a one-year nondegree certificate program. No studies have examined possible links between high school academic preparation in the FSM and early college success outcomes, such as the college entrance test result. Examining these links could inform strategies to improve degree attainment. Using data on Pohnpei public high school graduates from 2016 to 2018 provided by the Pohnpei Department of Education and the College of Micronesia-FSM, this study examined high school academic preparation characteristics and college student characteristics to determine whether they are associated with five early college success outcomes: College of Micronesia-FSM Entrance Test result; placement in credit-bearing math, reading, and writing courses; and persistence to a second year. The study found that high school grade point average was positively associated with all five outcomes. Students who were enrolled in the high school academic coursework track were more likely than students who were enrolled in the business and vocational tracks to be admitted to a degree program and to enroll in credit-bearing reading courses. College students who first enrolled at the College of Micronesia-FSM in the summer term immediately after high school graduation were more likely to persist to a second year than those who first enrolled in the fall term.
6/22/2021
NCES 2021029 2012–2016 Program for International Student Assessment Young Adult Follow-up Study (PISA YAFS): How reading and mathematics performance at age 15 relate to literacy and numeracy skills and education, workforce, and life outcomes at age 19
This Research and Development report provides data on the literacy and numeracy performance of U.S. young adults at age 19, as well as examines the relationship between that performance and their earlier reading and mathematics proficiency in PISA 2012 at age 15. It also explores how other aspects of their lives at age 19—such as their engagement in postsecondary education, participation in the workforce, attitudes, and vocational interests—are related to their proficiency at age 15.
6/15/2021
NCEE 2021007 Adult Education Strategies: Identifying and Building Evidence of Effectiveness
The Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act encourages adult education programs to use evidence-based strategies to improve services and participant success. This systematic review of research suggests a need for more rigorous studies, as there is not yet much evidence to guide decision making around instructional and support strategies for adult learners.
4/27/2021
REL 2021073 Using High School Data to Predict College Readiness and Early College Success on Guåhan (Guam)
On Guåhan (Guam), the large percentages of students enrolling in non-credit-bearing courses at Kulehon Kumunidåt Guåhan (Guam Community College) and Unibetsedåt Guåhan (University of Guam) have raised concerns about college readiness and early college success. Without adequate research on predictors of college readiness and early success among students on Guåhan, educators and other stakeholders find it difficult to identify and support students at risk of being underprepared for college. This study examined which student characteristics predicted college readiness and early college success among students who graduated from Guåhan high schools and enrolled at Kulehon Kumunidåt Guåhan or Unibetsedåt Guåhan between 2012 and 2015. Students' college readiness and early college success were assessed using three indicators: enrolling in only credit-bearing math and English courses during the first year of college, earning all credits attempted during the first semester of college, and persisting to a second year of college. About 23 percent of students met all three indicators and were thus classified as demonstrating college readiness and early college success. The percentages of students who met each individual indicator varied: 30 percent enrolled in only credit-bearing math and English courses, 43 percent earned all the credits they attempted, and 74 percent persisted to a second year. Various student characteristics predicted meeting all three indicators and each individual indicator. Graduates of John F. Kennedy High School and male students were the most likely to meet all three indicators and were the most likely to enroll in only credit-bearing math and English courses. Completing a high-level math course during high school positively predicted meeting the composite indicator of college readiness and early college success and of enrolling in only credit-bearing math and English courses and earning all credits attempted. A higher cumulative high school grade point average also positively predicted meeting all three indicators and each individual indicator. Kulehon Kumunidåt Guåhan enrollees were more likely than Unibetsedåt Guåhan enrollees to earn all credits attempted during their first semester.
4/12/2021
NFES 2021013 Forum Guide to Strategies for Education Data Collection and Reporting (SEDCAR)
The Forum Guide to Strategies for Education Data Collection and Reporting (SEDCAR) was created to provide timely and useful best practices for education agencies that are interested in designing and implementing a strategy for data collection and reporting, focusing on these as key elements of the larger data process. It builds upon the Standards for Education Data Collection and Reporting (published by the Forum in 1991) and reflects the vast increase over the past three decades in the number of compulsory and/or continual data collections conducted by education agencies. This new resource is designed to be relevant to the state and local education agencies (SEAs and LEAs) of today, in which data are regularly collected for multiple purposes, and data collection and recording may be conducted by many different individuals within an agency.
3/11/2021
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