Skip Navigation

Search Results: (16-18 of 18 records)

 Pub Number  Title  Date
NCEE 20104027 Impacts of Comprehensive Teacher Induction: Final Results from a Randomized Controlled Study

The final report on an impact evaluation of comprehensive induction on beginning teachers compares retention, achievement, and classroom practices of teachers who were offered comprehensive induction services to teachers who were offered the support normally offered by the school.

Teachers assigned to receive comprehensive induction for either one or two years were supported by a full-time mentor who received ongoing training and materials to support the teachers' development. The teachers also were offered monthly professional development sessions and opportunities to observe veteran teachers.

The teachers were followed for three years. Key findings include:

  • There were no impacts on teacher retention rates after each of the three years of follow-up.
  • There were no impacts on teachers' classroom practices, which were measured during teachers' first year in the classroom.
  • For teachers offered one year of comprehensive induction, there were no impacts on student achievement in any of the teachers' first three years in the classroom.
  • For teachers offered two years of comprehensive induction, there were no impacts on student achievement in either of the first two years. However, in the third year, there were positive impacts on student achievement, based on the sample of teachers whose students had both pre-test and post-test scores. These impacts were equivalent to moving the average student from the 50th percentile to the 54th percentile in reading and the 58th percentile in math.

The report, Impacts of Comprehensive Teacher Induction: Final Results from a Randomized Controlled Study, uses data collected from 1,009 beginning teachers in 418 schools in 17 districts. Districts included in the study were not already offering comprehensive induction services, including paying for full-time mentors.

Novice teachers in approximately half of the schools were assigned by lottery to receive comprehensive induction services. In 10 of the districts, these teachers were provided one year of comprehensive induction services; in the remaining 7 districts, the teachers were provided two years of services. Teachers in the schools not assigned to receive comprehensive induction services were provided the support normally offered to novice teachers by the school.

Teacher practices were measured via classroom observations conducted in the spring of 2006. Data on teacher retention were collected via surveys administered in the fall of 2006, 2007, and 2008. Student test scores were collected from district administrative records for the 200506, 200607, and 200708 school years.

6/28/2010
NCEE 20104018 Evaluation of the Impact of the DC Opportunity Scholarship Program: Final Report
The DC Opportunity Scholarship Program (OSP) is the first federally funded voucher program in the United States, providing scholarships of up to $7,500 for low-income residents of the District of Columbia to send their children to local participating private schools.

The congressionally mandated evaluation of the Program compared the outcomes of about 2,300 eligible applicants randomly assigned to receive or not receive an OSP scholarship through a series of lotteries in 2004 and 2005. This final report finds that the Program had mixed longer-term effects on participating students and their parents, including:
  • No conclusive evidence that the OSP affected student achievement overall, or for the high-priority group of students who applied from "schools in need of improvement."
  • The Program significantly improved students' chances of graduating from high school, according to parent reports. Overall, 82 percent of students offered scholarships received a high school diploma, compared to 70 percent of those who applied but were not offered scholarships. This graduation rate improvement also held for the subgroup of OSP students who came from "schools in need of improvement."
  • Although parents had higher satisfaction and rated schools as safer if their child was offered or used an OSP scholarship, students reported similar ratings for satisfaction and safety regardless of whether they were offered or used a scholarship.
The evaluation also found that the cumulative loss of students between 2004 and 2009 from DC Public Schools (DCPS) to the Program was about 3 percent. In contrast, an estimated 20 percent of students annually change schools or leave DCPS. Thus, OSP-related transfers to private schools may not have been distinguishable from the larger share of other student departures.
6/22/2010
NCEE 20134004 Evaluation of the DC Opportunity Scholarship Program

For report NCEE 2010-4018 Evaluation of the DC Opportunity Scholarship Program http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/pubs/20104018/index.asp.

The DC Opportunity Scholarship Program is the first federally funded voucher program in the United States. A congressionally-mandated evaluation of the effectiveness of the program was conducted with two cohorts of applicants (spring 2004 and spring 2005) who entered lotteries to determine whether they would receive a private school scholarship. These approximately 23000 students were administered academic assessments and they and their parents, along with DC public and private school principals, were surveyed over four years about their experiences. These data were released along with the final report (http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/pubs/20104018/index.asp).

6/1/2010
<< Prev    16 - 18    
Page 2  of  2