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 Pub Number  Title  Date
NCES 2022144 Condition of Education 2022
The Condition of Education 2022 is a congressionally mandated annual report summarizing the latest data from NCES and other sources on education in the United States. This report is designed to help policymakers and the public monitor educational progress.
5/31/2022
NCES 2022017 Private School Universe Survey (PSS): Restricted-Use Data File User’s Manual for School Year 2019–20
User's Manual for 2019-20 restricted-use data file including codebook.
1/27/2022
NCES 2022021 Private School Universe Survey (PSS): Public-Use Data File User’s Manual for School Year 2019–208
User's Manual for the 2019-20 PSS public-use data file, including code book.
1/27/2022
NCES 2021144 Condition of Education 2021
The Condition of Education 2021 is a congressionally mandated annual report summarizing the latest data from NCES and other sources on education in the United States. This report is designed to help policymakers and the public monitor educational progress.
5/25/2021
NCES 2021037 Public high school 4-year adjusted cohort graduation rate (ACGR), by race/ethnicity and selected demographic characteristics for the United States, the 50 states, and the District of Columbia: School Year 2018-19
The Public High School 4-year Adjusted Cohort Graduation Rate (ACGR) Table provides data at the national and state level for the fifty states and the District of Columbia to meet reporting requirements of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). The table displays an overall national rate, a state rate, national and state rates for racial/ethnic groups and other demographics. State data are included for the second time for "Homeless enrolled" and "Foster care." The table represents EDFacts File Specification 150 (Data Group 695), School year 2018–19; As of July 24, 2020.
3/22/2021
NFES 2020132 Forum Guide to Exit Codes
The Forum Guide to Exit Codes provides best practice information for tracking data about when students transferred, completed high school, dropped out, or otherwise exited an education agency. This resource defines exit codes and reviews their use in an education agency; provides an updated, voluntary, common taxonomy for exit codes; discusses best practices and methods for addressing specific challenges in exit codes data collection; features case studies that highlight different education agencies’ approaches to and experiences with exit coding.
9/29/2020
NCES 2020144 The Condition of Education 2020
The Condition of Education 2020 is a congressionally mandated annual report summarizing the latest data from NCES and other sources on education in the United States. This report is designed to help policymakers and the public monitor educational progress.
5/19/2020
NCES 2019072 Private School Universe Survey (PSS): Restricted-Use Data File User’s Manual for School Year 2017–18
User's Manual for 2017-18 restricted-use data file including codebook.
9/9/2019
NCES 2019074 Private School Universe Survey (PSS): Public-Use Data File User’s Manual for School Year 2017–18
User's Manual for the 2017-18 PSS public-use data file, including code book.
9/4/2019
NFES 2019035 Forum Guide to Early Warning Systems
The Forum Guide to Early Warning Systems provides information and best practices to help education agencies plan, develop, implement, and use an early warning system in their agency to inform interventions that improve student outcomes. The document includes a review of early warning systems and their use in education agencies and explains the role of early warning indicators, quality data, and analytical models in early warning systems. It also describes how to adopt an effective system planning process and recommends best practices for early warning system development, implementation, and use. The document highlights seven case studies from state and local education agencies who have implemented, or are in the process of implementing, an early warning system.
11/16/2018
REL 2018278 Advanced course completion rates among New Mexico high school students following changes in graduation requirements
In an effort to promote college and career readiness, the state of New Mexico passed a law in 2008 requiring high school students to complete at least one unit of advanced coursework (for example, Advanced Placement [AP], gifted and talented, honors, and International Baccalaureate courses) in order to graduate. The purpose of this was to study examine the completion of advanced coursework during the period following the legislative change for all high school students in New Mexico who were freshmen in 2009/10, 2010/11, and 2011/12 and were in a New Mexico high school for four years. Descriptive statistics were used to examine differences by student subgroups (White, Hispanic, and American Indian students) and other characteristics (student performance on the 8th grade standards-based exam, free-reduced price lunch status, and English learner status), and by school characteristics (school size, school performance rating, Title I status, and urbanicity). The study finds that over 56 percent of students in New Mexico completed one or more advanced courses in high school. Results indicate that a higher percentage of White students completed one or more advanced courses than Hispanic and American Indian students. This gap in course completion across racial and ethnic groups was smaller, though persisted, when examining high-performing students. Results show that a higher percentage of students in larger schools completed one or more advanced courses than in smaller schools, and this gap persisted even when examining high-performing students. Education agencies could improve supports aimed at increasing advanced course access (for example, staff development efforts, teacher quality, and paying AP exam fees) and the supply of advanced course offerings in schools with low advanced course completion rates in order to help improve advanced course participation and completion rates.
10/3/2017
REL 2018277 Graduation exam participation and performance, graduation rates, and advanced course-taking following changes in New Mexico graduation requirements, 2011–15
New Mexico students who were in grade 9 in 2009/10 and were expected to graduate in 2013 were the first cohort to be required to meet increased math and science course requirements and to take a new graduation exam. The purpose of this study was to describe graduation exam performance of the 2011–2015 cohorts, enrollment in Algebra II and lab science for the 2014–2015 cohorts, and the relationship of exam performance and enrollment with graduation outcomes. Grade 11 and 12 exam results for five cohorts of students–2011 cohort through 2015 are compared. Among students who took an exam in grade 11, the percentages who scored proficient or above on the reading, math, and science components of the exams by grade 12 are compared across cohorts and by gender, race/ethnicity, free or reduced-price lunch eligibility status, and English learner status. Percentages of student subgroups in cohort 2014 and cohort 2015 who took Algebra II and two lab sciences are also compared. The report describes the percentage of students in different subgroups who go on to graduate for those with various levels of performance on the exams and for those who are and are not taking Algebra II and two lab science courses. The results indicate that among students who stayed in school to grade 11, more scored proficient or higher on the math and science components of the graduation exam than before the change in requirements. The increase in proficiency rates for reading, math, and science between 2011 and 2015 was particularly large for Hispanic students and low for Native American students. Among those who stayed in school for four years, the percentage of students enrolling in Algebra II and two lab science courses increased between the 2014 cohort and the 2015 cohort, and Native American students in these cohorts had the highest rates of enrollment in these courses. Students who were proficient in more sections of the exam and students who took Algebra II and two lab science courses had higher rates of graduation than other students. The overall direction of change is positive on these measures, but differences were found in exam performance, course enrollment, and related graduation outcomes by subgroups. These differences may have implications for targeting resources and services for students most in need of support for staying in school and fulfilling requirements necessary to graduate.
10/3/2017
NCES 2017158 Private School Universe Survey (PSS): Restricted-Use Data File User’s Manual for School Year 2015–16
User's Manual for 2015-16 restricted-use data file including codebook.
9/19/2017
NCES 2017160 Private School Universe Survey (PSS): Public-Use Data File User’s Manual for School Year 2015–16
User's Manual for the 2015-16 PSS public-use data file, including code book.
9/19/2017
REL 2017272 Getting students on track for graduation: Impacts of the Early Warning Intervention and Monitoring System after one year
Early warning systems that use research-based warning signs to identify students at risk of dropping out of high school have emerged as one strategy for improving graduation rates. This study tested the impact of one early warning system, the Early Warning Intervention and Monitoring System (EWIMS), on 37,671 students in grades 9 and 10 and their schools after one year of implementation. Seventy-three high schools were randomly assigned to implement EWIMS during the 2014/15 school year or to continue their usual practices for identifying and supporting students at risk of not graduating on time. Impact findings show that EWIMS reduced the percentage of students with risk indicators related to chronic absence and course failure but not related to low grade point averages, suspensions, or insufficient credits to graduate. At the school level, EWIMS did not have a detectable impact on school data culture, that is, the ways in which schools use data to make decisions and identify students in need of additional support. Findings suggest that overall implementation of the EWIMS seven-step process was low in nearly all EWIMS schools, and that implementation of EWIMS was challenging for participating schools. The authors hypothesize that other school-level processes, unmeasured in this study, also may have contributed to impacts on students. For example, effects might have emerged for chronic absence and course failure if schools prioritized encouraging students to show up and participate in their courses, even if they did not have a sophisticated set of interventions. Further research is needed to better understand the mechanisms through which EWIMS had an impact on chronic absence and course failure. This report provides rigorous, initial evidence that even with limited implementation during the first year of adoption, use of a comprehensive early warning system such as EWIMS can reduce the percentage of students who are chronically absent or who fail one or more courses. These short-term results are promising because chronic absence and course failures in grades 9 and 10 are two key indicators that students are off track for graduation.
4/25/2017
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