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Table 3B. NEGATIVE FACTORS INFLUENCING DECISION TO TEACH: Among graduates who had taught at the K–12 level since receiving the 2007–08 bachelor’s degree, percentage who reported various financial or career-related factors as negative influences on their decision to teach, by selected individual, enrollment, and teaching-related characteristics: 2012

Individual, enrollment, and teaching-related characteristics Opportunity to contribute to society   Working with kids   Teacher accountability for student achievement   Prestige of occupation   Working conditions   Loan forgiveness or other financial incentives to teach   Possibilities for career advancement   Financial compensation  
    Total 0.8 ! 3.5 20.8 9.8 30.1 6.8 18.1 31.0
Sex
  Male 2.3 ! 20.4 7.8 25.8 4.3 ! 17.7 28.4
  Female 1.0 ! 3.9 21.0 10.4 31.6 7.7 18.3 31.8
Race/ethnicity1
  White 0.9 ! 3.4 21.3 10.2 28.9 7.9 18.7 32.9
  Black # 25.3 37.4 17.8 21.8
  Hispanic 13.2 7.7 ! 27.9 2.7 ! 11.3 ! 20.1
  Asian # 27.2 ! 24.4 !
  Other
  Two or more races # 28.2 ! 55.4 24.0 ! 37.3
Age at bachelor’s degree award
  23 or younger 1.0 ! 4.4 22.2 11.6 32.9 6.8 19.0 33.9
  24–29 1.8 ! 18.3 6.8 22.8 6.0 ! 17.1 27.0
  30 or older # 16.7 3.7 ! 25.0 8.2 15.2 20.7
Highest education attained by either parent2
  High school or less 11.0 2.7 ! 21.0 5.8 ! 10.9 21.8
  Some postsecondary education 2.2 ! 19.1 8.2 30.8 4.6 17.0 28.5
  Bachelor’s degree 4.0 ! 21.4 9.3 28.8 9.0 17.3 32.6
  Graduate or professional degree 5.7 28.3 16.3 36.9 7.7 25.0 38.2
Bachelor’s degree major3
  STEM major4 7.2 ! 21.9 13.2 ! 39.9 5.9 ! 32.3 35.2
   Computer and information sciences 
   Engineering and engineering technology
   Biological and physical sciences, science technology, mathematics, and agricultural sciences 8.9 ! 22.4 14.3 ! 36.2 7.3 ! 28.8 34.9
  Non-STEM major 0.8 ! 3.1 20.7 9.4 29.1 6.9 16.7 30.6
   General studies and other5 # # 21.6 ! 19.7 ! 20.5 !
   Social sciences  5.9 ! 22.4 15.3 40.7 7.2 ! 28.9 35.5
   Humanities  7.6 25.1 16.4 37.1 7.4 ! 22.8 37.7
   Health care fields  # 25.0 ! 24.8 ! 34.8 !
   Business  # 16.0 ! 37.1 28.1 ! 35.4
   Education  0.7 ! 21.2 6.5 24.5 7.1 11.6 28.4
   Other applied6 # 14.2 7.2 ! 24.4 6.7 ! 10.9 ! 23.0
Cumulative undergraduate grade point average
  Less than 2.50 # 20.3 ! # 28.5 !
  2.50–2.99 # 17.1 5.6 ! 22.7 4.5 ! 15.3 20.9
  3.00–3.49 1.5 ! 2.6 ! 20.3 8.6 29.2 7.3 16.4 30.6
  3.50 or higher 5.4 22.9 12.6 33.9 7.8 20.7 34.7
Bachelor’s degree institution level and control
  Public 1.0 ! 2.7 ! 20.6 8.2 27.2 6.5 16.6 28.1
   Non-doctorate-granting 13.7 5.0 20.8 3.7 12.0 24.1
   Doctorate-granting 1.4 ! 3.8 ! 23.7 9.6 30.2 7.8 18.7 29.9
  Private nonprofit 4.7 21.2 13.2 36.1 7.7 21.8 37.3
   Non-doctorate-granting # 5.4 24.0 10.9 33.8 6.1 ! 16.7 33.4
   Doctorate-granting 3.9 ! 17.8 15.9 38.9 9.6 28.0 42.1
  For-profit
Highest degree attained
  Bachelor’s degree 1.1 ! 3.9 20.7 10.1 30.5 7.1 18.5 30.6
  Master’s degree or postbaccalaureate certificate7 2.6 ! 20.9 9.0 29.0 6.5 16.9 31.5
  Doctoral degree8
Certified to teach in 2012
  Yes 1.4 ! 22.3 7.9 28.4 7.1 15.6 30.0
  No 1.9 ! 6.7 18.5 12.8 32.8 6.4 22.1 32.5
Sector of school at current or most recent teaching job as of 20129
  Public 0.8 ! 3.4 23.1 10.0 28.9 7.0 17.2 28.0
  Private 2.5 ! 11.0 10.1 29.6 5.9 ! 21.1 39.8
Level of school at current or most recent teaching job as of 201210
  Elementary 4.2 21.9 11.5 30.0 6.8 17.0 28.8
  Secondary # 2.8 ! 21.3 9.0 28.8 8.7 18.1 30.6
  Combined 14.9 7.3 29.7 2.9 ! 22.7 35.2
Location of school at current or most recent teaching job as of 201211
  Urban 5.3 23.8 9.6 32.5 4.4 22.0 24.1
  Suburban or town 3.2 ! 20.2 11.5 29.9 7.8 16.7 35.0
  Rural 0.8 ! 17.3 8.0 24.5 8.7 14.8 29.7
Percent free/reduced-price lunch recipients at current or most recent teaching job as of 201212
  0–24 1.9 3.8 22.9 9.0 23.8 9.4 17.9 25.1
  25–49 0.3 3.0 22.8 9.5 25.8 6.5 15.9 32.7
  50–74 0.6 3.0 25.2 12.0 33.9 4.8 13.3 24.9
  75–100 0.6 2.7 22.3 9.4 33.1 7.8 21.2 26.2

# Rounds to zero.

! Interpret data with caution. Estimate is unstable because the standard error is between 30 and 50 percent of the estimate.

‡ Reporting standards not met.

1 Black includes African American, Hispanic includes Latino, Other includes American Indian, Alaska Native, Pacific Islander, and Native Hawaiian, and Two or more races includes graduates having origins in more than one race. Race categories exclude Hispanic origin.

2 The 1.1 percent of respondents who reported that they did not know their parents’ highest level of education were excluded from this distribution.

3 Graduates with multiple majors were classified by the first major field of study reported.

4 Includes science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

5 Other includes basic skills and citizenship activities; leisure and recreational activities; personal awareness and self-improvement; high school/secondary diplomas and certificate programs; and interpersonal and social skills.

6 Includes personal and consumer services; manufacturing, construction, repair, and transportation; military technology and protective services; architecture; communications; public administration and human services; design and applied arts; law and legal studies; library sciences; and theology and religious vocations.

7 Includes post-master’s certificates.

8 Includes doctoral degrees for professional practice, research/scholarship, and other doctoral degrees.

9 Estimates exclude graduates whose current or most recent teaching positions were in foreign, charter, or hospital schools, or as itinerant teachers.

10 Elementary schools are defined as those with a lowest grade offered of pre-kindergarten, kindergarten, or grades 1–6, and a highest grade offered of K–8. Secondary schools are defined as those with a lowest and highest grade offered of 7 through 12. Estimates exclude graduates whose current or most recent teaching positions were in foreign schools or as itinerant teachers. For more information, see https://nces.ed.gov/programs/digest/d12/tables/dt12_108.asp.

11 School location is defined in accordance with the National Center for Education Statistics’ urban-centric locale codes. Estimates exclude graduates whose current or most recent teaching positions were in foreign schools or as itinerant teachers. For more information on how school locations are classified, see http://nces.ed.gov/ccd/rural_locales.asp#defs.

12 The National School Lunch Program is a federally assisted meal program. To be eligible for free lunch under the program in 2011–12, a student had to be from a household with an income at or below 130 percent of the poverty threshold; to be eligible for reduced-price lunch, a student had to be from a household with an income between 130 percent and 185 percent of the poverty threshold. Estimates exclude graduates whose current or most recent teaching positions were in foreign or private schools or as itinerant teachers. For more information, see https://nces.ed.gov/programs/coe/indicator_clb.asp.

NOTE: Respondents were asked whether a teaching-related factor had a positive, negative, or no influence on their decision to teach. Estimates include graduates who earned bachelor’s degrees in Title IV eligible postsecondary institutions in the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico, and who had taught as regular, itinerant, support, long-term substitute, or other K–12 teachers since receiving the 2007–08 bachelor’s degree. To recreate the estimates above in PowerStats (https://nces.ed.gov/datalab), use the QuickRetrieve codes: bmnbffdf, bmnbffa7, bmnbffd7a, bmnbffn38, bmnbffef8, bmnbff56, bmnbff3a, and bmnbff6a.

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, 2008/12 Baccalaureate and Beyond Longitudinal Study (B&B:08/12).

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