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Figure 4. Percentage of fourth- and eighth-grade students who reached the TIMSS advanced international benchmark in science, by country: 2007

Percentage of fourth- and eighth-grade students who reached the TIMSS advanced international benchmark in science, by country: 2007
Color swatch indicating that percentage is higher than U.S. percentage (p < .05) Percentage is higher than U.S. percentage (p < .05)
Color swatch indicating that percentage is not measurably different from U.S. percentage (p < .05) Percentage is not measurably different from U.S. percentage (p < .05)
Color swatch indicating that percentage is lower than U.S. percentage (p < .05) Percentage is lower than U.S. percentage (p < .05)
# Rounds to zero.
*p < .05. Percentage is significantly different from the international median percentage.
1 National Defined Population covers 90 percent to 95 percent of National Target Population.
2 Met guidelines for sample participation rates only after substitute schools were included.
3 Hong Kong is a Special Administrative Region (SAR) of the People's Republic of China
4 National Target Population does not include all of the International Target Population defined by the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS).
5 Nearly satisfied guidelines for sample participation rates only after substitute schools were included.
6 Kuwait tested the same cohort of students as other countries, but later in 2007, at the beginning of the next school year.
7 National Defined Population covers less than 90 percent of National Target Population (but at least 77 percent).
NOTE: The Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) international median represents all participating TIMSS jurisdictions, including the United States. The international median represents the percentage at which half of the participating countries have that percentage of students at or above the median and half have that percentage of students below the median. The tests for significance take into account the standard error for the reported difference.
Thus, a small difference between the United States and one country may be significant while a large difference between the United States and another country may not be significant. The standard errors for the estimates are shown in table E-42 available at http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2009001.
SOURCE: International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA), Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS), 2007.


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National Center for Education Statistics - http://nces.ed.gov
U.S. Department of Education