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Table 17.  Number of students in public high schools involved in the distribution, possession, or use of alcohol or illegal drugs at school, and the number and percentage of students receiving various disciplinary actions, by selected school characteristics: School year 2003–04


School characteristic      Disciplinary actions taken for students involved in the distribution, possession, or use of alcohol or illegal drugs at school 
Total students
involved in
recorded offenses
  Removals without
continuing services
  Transfers to
specialized schools1
  Out-of-school
suspensions
lasting 5 or more days
  Other disciplinary action2
Number   Number Percent   Number Percent   Number Percent   Number Percent
All public schools  108,106   7,031 7   24,886 24   45,686 44   25,926 25
                           
Enrollment size                           
Less than 300  3,059   106 5   627 27   757 33   808 35
300–499  5,454   966 18   1,114 21   2,023 38   1,285 24
500–999  17,408   1,380 8   4,512 27   7,105 42   3,977 23
1,000 or more  82,185   4,579 6   18,633 24   35,801 45   19,856 25
                           
Urbanicity                           
City  35,143   2,943 9   7,797 23   13,760 41   9,414 28
Urban fringe  42,436   1,887 5   10,390 25   18,933 46   9,602 24
Town  11,939   937 8   2,952 25   5,440 46   2,458 21
Rural  18,587   1,264 7   3,747 22   7,554 44   4,451 26
                           
Crime level where students live3                           
High  8,002   1,384 18   1,741 22   2,699 35   1,976 25
Moderate  26,319   1,504 6   6,952 27   10,166 40   6,937 27
Low  51,515   2,316 5   10,532 22   24,125 50   11,717 24
Mixed  22,270   1,827 9   5,662 26   8,696 40   5,296 25
                           
Percent minority enrollment4                           
Less than 5 percent  12,608   846 7   974 8   7,298 63   2,534 22
5 to 20 percent  28,644   1,305 5   5,139 19   13,720 50   7,318 27
20 to 50 percent  27,134   1,498 6   7,154 28   12,744 49   4,567 18
50 percent or more  37,172   2,806 8   10,411 29   11,498 32   11,246 31
                           
Percent of students
eligible for free or
reduced-price lunch 
                         
0–20 percent  38,412   1,286 4   6,634 18   19,286 53   9,049 25
21–50 percent  41,013   2,752 7   10,403 27   17,536 45   8,487 22
More than 50 percent  28,680   2,993 11   7,848 28   8,864 32   8,389 30
                           
Percent of students below 15th
percentile on standardized tests 
                         
0–5 percent  24,291   1,599 7   6,266 27   9,468 41   5,689 25
6–15 percent  46,822   2,079 5   10,176 23   21,739 49   10,300 23
More than 15 percent  36,992   3,353 9   8,443 23   14,479 40   9,936 27
                           
Percent of students likely
to attend college 
                         
0–35 percent  22,292   1,925 9   6,085 28   8,840 40   5,074 23
36–60 percent  28,867   2,481 9   6,861 25   13,247 47   5,393 19
More than 60 percent  56,947   2,625 5   11,939 22   23,599 44   15,458 29
                           
Percent of students who consider
academic achievement important 
                         
0–25 percent  4,739   277 6   1,909 41   2,038 44   456 10
26–50 percent  26,381   1,346 5   6,260 24   11,667 45   6,505 25
51–75 percent  33,048   2,671 9   7,366 24   13,070 42   7,694 25
More than 75 percent  43,937   2,737 6   9,352 22   18,911 45   11,270 27
                           
Percent male enrollment                           
0–44 percent  6,939   347 5   1,946 29   2,115 32   2,210 33
45–55 percent  94,296   6,005 7   21,577 24   41,272 46   21,246 24
More than 55 percent  6,871   679 10   1,363 20   2,299 34   2,469 36
                           
Student-to-teacher ratio5                           
Less than 12 students  24,351   1,711 7   5,737 24   10,216 44   5,810 25
12–16 students  46,008   3,621 8   13,061 29   17,911 40   10,407 23
More than 16 students  37,746   1,699 5   6,088 17   17,559 50   9,709 28
                           
Number of classroom changes6                           
0–3 changes  3,941   243 6   829 22   1,248 33   1,480 39
4–6 changes  58,962   4,493 8   13,056 23   24,652 44   14,424 25
More than 6 changes  45,203   2,295 5   11,001 26   19,786 46   10,021 23
                           
Regular use of law enforcement7                           
Regular use  95,033   6,487 7   22,385 24   39,624 43   22,911 25
No regular use  13,073   545 4   2,500 21   6,062 50   3,015 25
                           
Number of serious
discipline problems8 
                         
No problems  53,179   3,164 6   13,368 26   21,956 43   12,728 25
1 problem  16,835   920 6   3,802 24   7,510 46   3,946 24
2 problems  15,301   1,500 11   3,017 21   5,491 39   4,126 29
3 or more problems  22,790   1,447 7   4,698 21   10,729 49   5,125 23
                           
Transfers as a percentage
of enrollment9 
                         
0 to 6 percent  18,544   1,343 8   2,065 12   9,908 57   4,089 23
6 to 11 percent  17,414   1,347 8   3,833 22   7,028 41   4,832 28
11 to 21 percent  37,502   2,214 6   8,376 24   15,911 45   9,054 25
21 percent or more  34,646   2,127 6   10,612 32   12,840 38   7,950 24
                           
Prevalence of schoolwide
disruptions10 
                         
No disruptions  81,845   4,752 6   17,561 23   36,394 47   19,336 25
Any disruptions  26,261   2,279 9   7,325 29   9,292 36   6,589 26
                           
Percent of students
absent on a daily basis 
                         
0–2 percent  6,389   231 4   1,273 23   1,729 31   2,287 41
3–5 percent  36,296   2,295 7   9,112 26   14,045 41   9,180 27
6–10 percent  55,236   3,983 7   12,377 23   24,856 47   12,156 23
More than 10 percent  10,184   522 5   2,124 21   5,055 51   2,303 23
                           
Prevalence of violent incidents11                           
No violent incidents  525   74 15   14 3   132 27   273 55
Any violent incidents  107,581   6,957 7   24,871 24   45,554 44   25,652 25
1 Specialized school was defined for respondents as "a school that is specifically for students who were referred for disciplinary reasons. The school may also have students who were referred for other reasons. The school may be at the same location as your school."
2 Other disciplinary actions include suspension less than 5 days, detention, etc.
3 Respondents were asked, "How would you describe the crime level in the area(s) in which your students live?" Response options included "high level of crime," "moderate level of crime," "low level of crime," and "students come from areas with very different levels of crime."
4 These estimates exclude data from Tennessee because schools in this state did not report estimates of student race.
5 Student-to-teacher ratio was calculated by dividing the total number of students enrolled in the school by the total number of full-time-equivalent teachers and aides. The total number of full-time-equivalent teachers and aides is a combination of the full-time and part-time teachers and aides, including special education teachers and aides, with an adjustment to compensate for the part-time status.
6 Respondents were asked, "How many classroom changes do most students make in a typical day?" Responses exclude morning arrival and afternoon departure.
7 Respondents were asked, "During the 2003–2004 school year, did you have any sworn law enforcement officers, security guards, or security personnel present at your school on a regular basis?"
8 Serious discipline problems include student racial tensions, student bullying, student sexual harassment of other students, student verbal abuse of teachers, widespread disorder in classrooms, student acts of disrespect for teachers, gang activities, and cult or extremist group activities. If a respondent reported that any of these problems occurred daily or weekly in their school, each was counted once in the total number of serious discipline problems.
9 Transfers as a percentage of enrollment combines the number of students who were transferred to a school and the number of students who were transferred from a school divided by the total number of students enrolled in the school.
10 Schoolwide disruptions include actions that disrupted school activities such as death threats, bomb threats, and chemical, biological, or radiological threats. Respondents were instructed to exclude all fire alarms, including false alarms.
11 Violent incidents include rape, sexual battery other than rape, physical attack or fight with or without a weapon, threat of physical attack with or without a weapon, and robbery with or without a weapon.
NOTE: The numbers of students involved in offenses were provided by the principal or the person most knowledgeable about discipline issues at the school. Detail may not sum to totals because of rounding. Responses were provided by the principal or the person most knowledgeable about crime and safety issues at the school.
SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, School Survey on Crime and Safety (SSOCS), 2004.


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National Center for Education Statistics - http://nces.ed.gov
U.S. Department of Education