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Table 3.  Number and percentage of public high schools reporting sexual and physical assaults that occurred at school, the number of sexual and physical assaults, and the rate of sexual and physical assaults per 1,000 students, by selected school characteristics: School year 2003–04—Continued (Return to Table 3)


School characteristic Physical attack or fight with a weapon3,4 Physical attack or fight without a weapon3,4
Num-
ber of
schools
Per-
cent of
schools
Num-
ber of
incidents
Rate
per
1,000
students
  Num-
ber of
schools
Per-
cent of
schools
Num-
ber of
incidents
Rate
per
1,000
students
All public schools  851 8 3,337 0.3   10,234 95 167,422 14.4
                   
Enrollment size                   
Less than 300  45 3 65 0.2   1,273 78 4,421 12.1
300–499  31 2 31 #   1,459 93 9,607 14.3
500–999  181 7 356 0.2   2,709 98 30,707 14.7
1,000 or more  595 12 2,885 0.3   4,793 99 122,687 14.4
                   
Urbanicity                   
City  399 17 2,468 0.7   2,287 97 52,445 15.5
Urban fringe  261 7 587 0.1   3,399 96 65,676 13.1
Town  79 5 139 0.1   1,687 96 18,778 14.4
Rural  112 4 143 0.1   2,861 90 30,523 15.8
                   
Crime level where
students live5 
                 
High  158 28 1,883 2.6   549 98 21,884 30.0
Moderate  266 12 548 0.2   2,154 97 41,435 15.9
Low  315 5 644 0.1   5,979 93 69,415 11.3
Mixed  112 7 262 0.1   1,552 97 34,689 16.1
                   
Percent minority
enrollment6 
                 
Less than 5 percent  15 1 15 #   2,312 90 19,463 12.3
5 to 20 percent  144 5 260 0.1   2,626 94 35,165 11.6
20 to 50 percent  140 6 233 0.1   2,417 96 40,959 13.4
50 percent or more  530 19 2,807 0.8   2,702 98 68,728 18.4
                   
Percent of students
eligible for free or
reduced-price lunch 
                 
0–20 percent  236 6 908 0.2   3,477 93 42,645 9.2
21–50 percent  261 6 614 0.1   4,293 95 75,747 16.8
More than 50 percent  355 14 1,815 0.7   2,464 96 49,030 19.8
                   
Percent of students
below 15th percentile on
standardized tests 
                 
0–5 percent  243 8 516 0.2   2,708 92 31,823 10.4
6–15 percent  322 7 913 0.2   4,573 95 70,642 13.4
More than 15 percent  287 9 1,908 0.6   2,952 96 64,957 19.5
                   
Percent of students likely
to attend college 
                 
0–35 percent  249 12 794 0.4   1,994 95 47,153 23.4
36–60 percent  156 5 377 0.1   3,077 95 46,775 14.7
More than 60 percent  446 8 2,165 0.3   5,162 94 73,495 11.4
                   
Percent of students who
consider academic
achievement important 
                 
0–25 percent  28 3 102 0.2   842 95 11,233 16.7
26–50 percent  221 10 1,218 0.6   2,061 95 43,420 20.3
51–75 percent  218 6 1,306 0.4   3,310 96 53,001 14.4
More than 75 percent  385 9 711 0.1   4,021 93 59,769 11.6
                   
Percent male enrollment                   
0–44 percent  134 15 271 0.3   815 89 10,153 12.3
45–55 percent  672 7 3,021 0.3   8,637 96 146,658 14.3
More than 55 percent  45 5 45 0.1   781 89 10,612 19.1
                   
Student-to-teacher ratio7                   
Less than 12 students  201 5 327 0.1   3,785 90 43,436 15.8
12–16 students  284 7 1,622 0.3   4,034 99 68,255 13.8
More than 16 students  367 14 1,388 0.4   2,414 95 55,731 14.1
                   
Number of classroom
changes8 
                 
0–3 changes  22 4 22 #   526 95 6,965 12.9
4–6 changes  434 8 1,116 0.2   4,912 94 89,368 14.9
More than 6 changes  396 8 2,199 0.4   4,796 95 71,090 14.0
                   
Regular use of law
enforcement9 
                 
Regular use  792 10 3,258 0.3   7,514 97 148,107 14.6
No regular use  59 2 79 0.1   2,720 89 19,315 12.7
                   
Number of serious
discipline problems10 
                 
No problems  332 5 1,568 0.2   6,246 92 71,050 11.2
1 problem  203 12 1,019 0.5   1,575 96 29,585 15.2
2 problems  93 8 111 0.1   1,204 100 24,142 16.5
3 or more problems  223 18 639 0.3   1,208 99 42,646 22.6
                   
Transfers as a percentage
of enrollment11 
                 
0 to 6 percent  184 7 430 0.2   2,344 90 25,421 10.0
6 to 11 percent  154 7 505 0.2   2,065 95 25,805 12.8
11 to 21 percent  290 9 713 0.2   3,269 97 54,943 14.2
21 percent or more  223 8 1,689 0.5   2,555 95 61,254 19.2
                   
Prevalence of schoolwide
disruptions12 
                 
No disruptions  615 7 1,620 0.2   8,628 94 130,816 13.8
Any disruptions  236 14 1,717 0.8   1,606 98 36,607 17.0
                   
Percent of students
absent on a daily basis 
                 
0–2 percent  52 8 79 0.2   570 86 4,817 9.5
3–5 percent  228 6 1,272 0.3   3,868 95 48,115 11.5
6–10 percent  386 8 896 0.2   4,680 97 88,550 15.6
More than 10 percent  185 15 1,090 0.9   1,116 88 25,940 20.9
# Rounds to zero.
1 Rape was defined for respondents as "forced sexual intercourse (vaginal, anal, or oral penetration). Includes penetration from a foreign object."
2 Sexual battery was defined for respondents as an "incident that includes threatened rape, fondling, indecent liberties, child molestation, or sodomy. Classification of these incidents should take into consideration the age and developmentally appropriate behavior of the offender(s)."
3 Physical attack or fight was defined for respondents as an "actual and intentional touching or striking of another person against his or her will, or the intentional causing of bodily harm to an individual."
4 Weapon was defined for respondents as "any instrument or object used with the intent to threaten, injure, or kill. Includes look-alikes if they are used to threaten others."
5 Respondents were asked, "How would you describe the crime level in the area(s) in which your students live?" Response options included "high level of crime," "moderate level of crime," "low level of crime," and "students come from areas with very different levels of crime."
6 These estimates exclude data from Tennessee because schools in this state did not report estimates of student race.
7 Student-to-teacher ratio was calculated by dividing the total number of students enrolled in the school by the total number of full-time-equivalent teachers and aides. The total number of full-time-equivalent teachers and aides is a combination of the full-time and part-time teachers and aides, including special education teachers and aides, with an adjustment to compensate for the part-time status.
8 Respondents were asked, "How many classroom changes do most students make in a typical day?" Responses exclude morning arrival and afternoon departure.
9 Respondents were asked, "During the 2003–2004 school year, did you have any sworn law enforcement officers, security guards, or security personnel present at your school on a regular basis?"
10 Serious discipline problems include student racial tensions, student bullying, student sexual harassment of other students, student verbal abuse of teachers, widespread disorder in classrooms, student acts of disrespect for teachers, gang activities, and cult or extremist group activities. If a respondent reported that any of these problems occurred daily or weekly in their school, each was counted once in the total number of serious discipline problems.
11 Transfers as a percentage of enrollment combines the number of students who were transferred to a school and the number of students who were transferred from a school divided by the total number of students enrolled in the school.
12 Schoolwide disruptions include actions that disrupted school activities such as death threats, bomb threats, and chemical, biological, or radiological threats. Respondents were instructed to exclude all fire alarms, including false alarms.
NOTE: "At school" was defined for respondents to include activities that happen in school buildings, on school grounds, on school buses, and at places that hold school-sponsored events or activities. Detail may not sum to totals because of rounding. Responses were provided by the principal or the person most knowledgeable about crime and safety issues at the school.
SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, School Survey on Crime and Safety (SSOCS), 2004.


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National Center for Education Statistics - http://nces.ed.gov
U.S. Department of Education