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Table 9.  Number and percentage of public secondary schools reporting violent and other incidents of gang-related crimes with the number of incidents reported, by selected school characteristics: 1999–2000


School characteristic Violent incidents1   Serious violent incidents2   Theft3   Other incidents4
Number of schools Percent of schools Number of inci-
dents
  Number of schools Percent of schools Number of inci-
dents
  Number of schools Percent of schools Number of inci-
dents
  Number of schools Percent of schools Number of inci-
dents
All public secondary schools 1,262 11 12,402   420 4 1,400   148 1 611   1,011 9 7,493
                               
Enrollment size                              
Less than 300   # # #    
300–499   # # #   # # #  
500–999 114 4 1,121       137 4 270
1,000 or more1,071 22 11,167   404 8 1,384   71 1 535   794 16 7,092
                               
Urbanicity                              
City 788 33 8,700   270 11 1,135   102 4 565   575 24 5,185
Urban fringe 364 9 2,805   129 3 244     253 7 1,394
Town 53 3 494       131 7 730
Rural 57 1 403       51 1 184
                               
Crime level where students live5                              
High 224 48 2,768   68 15 267     157 34 1,712
Moderate 317 17 3,413   93 5 433     250 13 1,871
Low 439 6 3,670   149 2 237   54 1 72   405 5 1,485
Mixed 251 17 2,224   97 7 414   # # #   199 13 2,425
                               
Percent minority enrollment5                              
0–5 percent     # # #   46 1 46
6–20 percent 123 4 457       155 6 927
21–50 percent 346 14 2,492   104 4 307     252 10 917
More than 50 percent 766 29 9,379   298 11 1,075   106 4 552   558 21 5,603
                               
Percent of students eligible for free/reduced-price lunch                              
0–20 percent 370 8 2,670   128 3 381     304 6 1,891
21–50 percent 416 9 3,237   101 2 454   53 1 516   366 8 2,398
More than 50 percent 476 21 6,495   191 8 565     340 15 3,203
                               
Percent of students below 15th percentile on standardized tests                              
0–5 percent 203 6 701       151 4 1,314
6–15 percent 447 8 3,721   180 3 462     349 6 1,962
More than 15 percent 613 21 7,980   221 8 910   106 4 552   511 18 4,217
                               
Percent of students likely to attend college                              
0–35 percent 271 10 3,697   94 4 294     223 8 2,079
36–60 percent 454 12 4,613   138 4 663   39 1 502   324 9 2,295
More than 60 percent 537 10 4,092   188 3 443   97 2 97   464 8 3,118
                               
Percent of students who consider academic achievement important                              
0–25 percent 73 8 340   33 4 67     68 8 398
26–50 percent 323 13 2,897   80 3 269     324 13 2,042
51–75 percent 453 11 5,914   146 4 733   41 1 504   365 9 3,513
More than 75 percent 412 9 3,251   161 4 331     255 6 1,540
                               
Percent male enrollment                              
0–44 percent 89 8 229   # # #   # # #   69 6 484
45–55 percent 1,107 11 11,416   392 4 1,344   148 2 611   849 9 6,266
More than 55 percent 66 7 757   56   # # #   93 10 743
                               
Student/teacher ratio5,6                              
Less than 12 132 4 1,756   71 2 95     177 5 584
12–16 334 8 3,038   70 2 185   42 1 60   306 7 2,374
More than 16 627 18 6,769   254 7 1,046   43 1 489   505 15 4,498
                               
Number of classroom changes5                              
0–3 changes 58 12 315   24     33 7 243
4–6 changes 691 12 6,278   246 4 894   128 2 591   673 12 5,422
More than 6 changes 460 10 5,387   150 3 434     294 6 1,744
                               
Use of paid law enforcement7                              
Regular use 1,262 12 12,402   420 4 1,400   148 1 611   1,011 10 7,493
No regular use # # #   # # #   # # #   # # #
                               
Number of serious discipline problems8                              
No problems 36 1 53   # # #     39 1 118
1 problem 427 16 3,214   128 5 644     335 13 2,386
2 problems 246 12 2,942   90 4 312     184 9 581
3 or more problems 553 24 6,192   202 9 443   96 4 113   453 19 4,407
                               
Transfers as percentage of enrollment5,9                              
0 to 6 percent 321 8 2,414   82 2 150   45 1 62   154 4 1,685
6 to 11 percent 116 4 1,479   37 1 326     221 8 2,326
11 to 21 percent 236 10 1,799   93 4 174     262 11 1,053
21 percent or more 478 21 5,587   170 7 592     319 14 1,578
                               
Prevalence of schoolwide disruptions5,10                              
No disruptions 624 8 6,133   156 2 320     499 6 3,905
Any disruptions 525 18 5,456   210 7 937   110 4 574   430 15 2,325
                               
Percent of students absent without excuses                              
None 35 3 178   # # #    
1–2 percent 254 6 1,655   106 3 175     200 5 1,109
3–5 percent 403 11 2,866   96 3 237   96 3 113   334 9 2,730
6–10 percent 318 14 3,799   104 5 631     234 10 2,069
More than 10 percent 253 26 3,904   114 12 357   # # #   219 22 1,524
# Rounds to zero.
‡ Reporting standards not met.
1 Violent incidents include rape, sexual battery other than rape, physical attack or fight with or without a weapon, threat of physical attack with or without a weapon, and robbery with or without a weapon.
2 Serious violent incidents include rape, sexual battery other than rape, physical attack or fight with a weapon, threat of physical attack with a weapon, and robbery with or without a weapon.
3 Theft/larceny (taking things over $10 without personal confrontation) was defined for respondents as, "the unlawful taking of another person's property without personal confrontation, threat, violence, or bodily harm. Included are pocket picking, stealing purse or backpack (if left unattended or no force was used to take it from owner), theft from a building, theft from a motor vehicle or motor vehicle parts or accessories, theft of bicycles, theft from vending machines, and all other types of thefts."
4 Other incidents include possession of a firearm or explosive device, possession of a knife or sharp object, distribution of illegal drugs, possession or use of alcohol or illegal drugs, sexual harassment, or vandalism.
5 Some schools are omitted from these categories because of missing data on their school characteristics. For this reason, the detailed results do not sum to the totals. See appendix J of 2000 School Survey on Crime and Safety (SSOCS) Detailed Data Documentation (NCES 2004-307) for further information.
6 Student/teacher ratio was calculated by dividing the total number of students enrolled in the school by the total number of full-time equivalent teachers. The total number of full-time equivalent teachers is a combination of the full-time and part-time teachers, including special education teachers, with an adjustment to compensate for the part-time status.
7 Schools were included as regularly using paid law enforcement if they reported the use of paid law enforcement during any of the following times: at any time during school hours, while students were arriving or leaving, at selected school activities (e.g., athletic and social events, open houses, science fairs), or at any other time that the respondent specified.
8 Serious discipline problems is a count of discipline problems reported by principals. These discipline problems include student racial tensions, student bullying, student verbal abuse of teachers, widespread disorder in classrooms, and student acts of disrespect for teachers. If a principal reported that any of these problems occurred daily or weekly in their school, each was counted once in the total number of serious discipline problems. Undesirable gang activities and undesirable cult or extremist group activities were also counted once as a problem if the principal reported that these events occurred at all in their school.
9 Transfers as a percentage of enrollment combines the number of students who were transferred to a school and the number of students who were transferred from a school, divided by the total number of students enrolled in the school.
10 Schoolwide disruptions include actions that disrupted school activities such as bomb threats or anthrax threats. Respondents were instructed to exclude all fire alarms, including false alarms.
NOTE: Detail may not sum to totals because of rounding. "At school/at your school" was defined for respondents as including activities happening in school buildings, on school grounds, on school buses, and at places that are holding school-sponsored events or activities. Respondents were instructed to, unless the survey specified otherwise, only respond for those times that were during normal school hours or when school activities/events were in session. A gang was defined for respondents as, "an ongoing loosely organized association of three or more persons, whether formal or informal, that has a common name, signs, symbols or colors, whose members engage, either individually or collectively, in violent or other forms of illegal behavior." Secondary schools are defined as schools in which the lowest grade is not lower than grade 9 and the highest grade is not higher than grade 12.
SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, School Survey on Crime and Safety (SSOCS), 2000.


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National Center for Education Statistics - http://nces.ed.gov
U.S. Department of Education